AOPA Australia -

AOPA Oz - VALE to Bruce Rhoades 

Via aopa.com.au

Quote:VALE AOPA AUSTRALIA MEMBER: BRUCE RHOADES
September 6, 2019 By Benjamin Morgan

AOPA Australia Executive Director Benjamin Morgan reports.

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It is with sadness that the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia acknowledges the passing of our member, Mr Bruce Rhoades, on Sunday 1st September 2019, following a year long battle with brain cancer and leukemia.

Bruce was passionate about flying and used his skills as an experienced pilot to set-up the 1770 Castaway and Survivor holiday camps just north of Agnes Waters in Queensland.  The destination was immensely popular with international backpackers seeking a genuine Australian adventure, and made successful through Bruce’s outgoing personality.

At it’s peak, Bruce’s company, Wyndham Aviation, was flying 300 people a month to Middle Island for 2 hour adventure trips in light aircraft, however, in 2017 one of his aircraft was involved in a fatal accident, which lead to an immense public battle with CASA.

Award-winning ABC and Melbourne Age Journalist Adele Ferguson revealed how Bruce’s company had been unfairly targeted by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, and forced to close within ten days of the crash in pre-empting findings, which to this day, are yet to be made by the Queensland Coroner. 

On behalf of the AOPA Australia membership we extend our sincere condolences to Bruce’s family and friends and our hearts are with them at this difficult time
MTF...P2  Angel
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AOPA at Ausfly - BM on Airports.

Via LMH:




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Airports are our Biggest Problem: AOPA
18 October 2019
Comments 0 Comments
    

AOPA Australia CEO Ben Morgan has labeled threatened airport closures as the largest problem facing general aviation in Australia today.

Speaking at a seminar at Ausfly on Friday, Morgan said that dealing with municipal airport owners was a greater issue than tackling the regulators.

"I actually think that CASA has become a secondary problem over the years," Morgan said. "There is a growing trend right now that local councils are making decisions that airports are not needed anymore. Right now we are battling 27 local councils over 27 airports that are at a risk of closure and it’s a really difficult fight.

"The largest argument is the argument of risk, and a lot of this has come up in the last year after CASA reworked CASR Part 139 [aerodrome regulations]. CASA has a framework of standards for registered aerodromes, and those regulations are so extreme that many local councils are thinking they can’t meet the standard. Their initial reaction is if they can’t meet the standard for a registered airport, then there’s a liability issue and they’re going to be sued.

"Councils have no understanding that an airport can be run as an ALA quite successfully and the risks can be managed more easily. Our frustration is that we know that from an industry perspective. ALA’s can be virtually anywhere and the pilot in command takes the decision to land, so the pilot takes on the liability to decide if the airport is suitable for them to take-off and land."

Morgan told the gathering that AOPA was making ground as an advocate for keeping airports open, thanks to other associations shouldering part of the load and AOPA's growing understanding about the way local councils operated.

"Our engagement with councils over the past has not been effective," he admitted. "It’s taken a number of years to learn how to be an effective advocate, to battle councillors, local government mentality and to support the local community.

"There was an 'A-ha!' moment about two years ago when we realised they weren’t aviation people, and we had to start at the very bottom with them; get in there and build up their general knowledge.

"We’re trying to take a more inclusive approach and partner with the councils; trying to reinforce the relationship and get airport advisory committees set-up. Through that process we’ve been able to work with General Managers and CEOs and airport managers so they understand there’s ways to mitigate and manage their risk.

"In the last six months we’ve become much more effective and we’ve been able to get to a situation where local councils have decided to close airports and not renew leases, and we’ve been able to turn that around."

Morgan cited Gympie in QLD and Georgetown in Tasmania as airports where AOPA had had wins at airports threatened with closure or inappropriate development.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...1kvVwme.99




MTF...P2  Tongue
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Via AOPA Oz... Wink


ANGEL FLIGHT FOUNDER HANGS UP HIS WINGS
November 26, 2019 By Kreisha Ballantyne
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After 16 years in the cockpit, propelling Angel Flight forwards, Founder and Chair Mr Bill Bristow, AM, has retired. KREISHA BALLANTYNE reports.

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Identifying a critical need for a scheme to support rural Australians having to to travel to major cities for medical diagnosis, treatment and often extensive follow up visits, Mr Bristow devised a charity which met these essential needs.  His lifelong passion for flying led him to recognise the benefits pilots and their private aircraft could offer to rural and remote Australians across the nation.

Buoyed by regular trips to outback areas, his association with pilots in medical professions and increasing closures of specialist medical services, he looked closely at the worsening disadvantages faced by rural communities.

From humble beginnings with 80 volunteer pilots, and no passengers, Mr Bristow launched a charity – Angel Flight – which now has more than 3000 registered pilots and 4000 drivers (‘Earth Angels’) who together volunteer their aircraft and vehicles, skills and time to transport passengers to medical appointments.

Mr Bristow set up a remarkable system of linking health professional registrations and referrals between all large city hospitals, to outback clinics, remote area nurses and specialist institutions, as well as a network of essential skilled volunteer pilots and drivers.  All services are free and at no cost to any person needing medical attention or to the government.

A keen aviator, Mr Bristow’s first flying achievement was gaining a glider pilot licence in 1970, followed by his fixed-wing pilot licence before adding a helicopter licence to his flying skill set.


His most recent aircraft, a Pilatus PC12 has been used extensively in the service of Angel Flight.

Honoured nationally in Australia, and internationally, for his outstanding charitable work in aviation: the unparalleled success of a charity assisting tens of thousands of country families to access specialist medical treatment in the cities, Mr Bristow may not have visualised such a significant achievement back in 2003.

Today Angel flight has provided free flights and airport/city specialist drives totaling more than 20 million kilometres.  With in excess of 47,000 fights, carrying over 100,000 rural Australians from every Australian State and Territory, and every age group, Angel Flight continues to grow, ensuring rural people no longer need to drive up to 14 hours each way on dangerous outback roads to obtain medical check-ups and treatment, and for compassionate visits for those who must be close to loved ones in often very difficult situations.




MTF...P2  Tongue
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Well done that man.

A good, valuable innings, nicely played. You’d have to take your hat off to man like Bristow and wish him well to enjoy his retirement.

“Mr Bristow set up a remarkable system of linking health professional registrations and referrals between all large city hospitals, to outback clinics, remote area nurses and specialist institutions, as well as a network of essential skilled volunteer pilots and drivers.  All services are free and at no cost to any person needing medical attention or to the government.”

No small achievement, a remarkable one when you consider the work, determination and effort involved stringing all the diverse elements into a cohesive, working system – all voluntary. The energy and dedication required phenomenal.

I wonder what his thoughts must be on the ATSB report into Mt Gambier event and the CASA response to that report? A fellah with the amount of drive, intelligence and determination to set up and run Angel Flight would have to be a little taken aback by it; probably with good reason.

One could understand a reasonable man’s disappointment with a punitive regulatory philosophy. Take the two ‘fatal’ events involving Angel Flight ‘missions’ (I do wish they’d call ‘em something else): both essentially pilot error. Errors made by pilots trained, qualified and licenced under the current system. Both persisted into weather conditions which they were neither trained nor qualified to be operating in; deadly mistakes, made by the pilots; not Angel Flight.

Yet rather than address the ‘core’ issues, CASA prefer to bring in a new rule set, which punishes the many and changes nothing. Why can’t some of the alleged CASA ‘experts’ be sent to work with AF, help draft up some guidelines for the aircrew involved? Simple stuff like weather forecast analysis training; promoting early awareness leading to early notice that it may not be possible to carry out the assigned flight. Or, even a ‘checklist’ in the style of Flight Safety’s CFIT checklist system; which encompasses fatigue, weather, destination and in flight awareness of potential high risk elements. There are lots of things which could be done to foster, promote and reduce potential risk. The ‘rules’ CASA dreamed up do nothing to promote a real safety culture; they just punish those remaining ‘law abiding’ citizens who have not – as yet – made the wrong decision. I call that unfair, unreasonable and counter productive.

Only my opinion of course; but I say a lot of time, money, effort and aggravation has been expended to produce a negative outcome, which will not prevent another Loss of Control (LoC) in instrument only conditions. It will however force underground open reporting and determined addressing of an accident series which has been around for a long, long time. But I digress.

Enjoy your retirement Bill; well done. There may just be a few out in Bush who would second my best wishes. Cheers. (Cue round of applause).....

Toot – toot.
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Via AOPA Oz:



AOPA AUSTRALIA TO MEET WITH SENATOR SUSAN MCDONALD

November 28, 2019 By Benjamin Morgan

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The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia will attend a meeting in Canberra on Wednesday 4th December 2019 with Queensland Senator Susan McDonald to discuss general aviation industry concerns.  Attending the meeting will be;

AOPA Australia President, Shawn Kelly
AOPA Australia CEO, Benjamin Morgan
SAAA President, Tony White
AMROBA Executive Director, Ken Cannane
McDermott Helicopters MD, Simon McDermott



You could start by asking why the good Senator was MIA yesterday?

Ref: https://auntypru.com/forum/showthread.ph...8#pid10828



And my desciption with Thorny and the "K" posts tagged:

Quote:Yesterday without even a whimper the Australian Senate delivered yet another telling blow to an ailing General aviation industry by conceding to the pointless  and expensive bureaucratic (CASA/ATSB) inflicted embuggerance of Angel Flight.

Thornbird: "The Government is committed to maintaining a safe aviation environment for all
Australians." https://auntypru.com/forum/showthread.ph...5#pid10825
&..
Kharon; “Air Safety is our prime concern” https://auntypru.com/forum/showthread.ph...7#pid10827

Ref: https://auntypru.com/sbg-20-10-19-the-vo...ilderness/

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Hmmm...and where was 'Sic-em-REX' and the "the voice of one crying in the wilderness"??  Dodgy
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AOPA Oz, via FB: https://www.facebook.com/pg/AOPAaustrali...e_internal




POLITICAL HYPOCRISY: PRIVATISATION APPARENTLY NO GOOD, SAYS ALBANESE

The Sydney Morning Herald - February 15-16th, 2020: Apparently the former ALP Transport Minister and serving ALP Leader, The Hon Anthony Albanese, thinks privatising national assets is thoroughly inappropriate!

“Sydney Harbour is a National asset, not a money-making venture... if you have long term leases and an alienation of public space, then that is defacto privatisation. This is a precious resource, not a play thing for corporate interests.”, The Hon Anthony Albanese MP.

What a shame our politicians - from all sides - did not hold the same conviction when they sold out our national airport infrastructure, only for it to become the ‘play-thing of corporate interests’.

The privatisation of Australia's general aviation airports has inflicted significant damage on our industry and aviation economy, and continues to do so unabated.

For many within the industry, it's too late, having been destroyed through unsustainable increases in rents, fees and charges, that have skyrocketed since privatisation some 20 years ago.

Over the past two decades, during a time that thousands of industry participants wrote to and called on our various Minister's for Transport - of which the Hon Anthony Albanese MP was one of, where were the strong voices of opposition to privatisation then? Where were the calls to protect the interests of Australian's dependent on access to our airport assets?

Both sides of government have ignored the warnings and pleas of our industry, with countless businesses and individuals driven broke and out of aviation entirely.

Both sides have been almost silent with respect to the damage inflicted and neither have stood up to the privatised profiteering and financial rape we have all been subjected to.

Australia's airports are very much a national asset, and aircraft owners and pilots have been alienated from their access and use - all in the interests of corporate profits.

Like Sydney Harbour and a vast array of other community and public infrastructure, our airports are a precious resource too and they should NEVER have been allowed to become the play-thing that they now are for profit-hungry privatised owners.

AOPA Australia is proudly standing up for our industry and highlighting the political hypocrisy which we are enduring.

BENJAMIN MORGAN
CEO | AOPA Australia

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Quote:

Min Stokes Albo was the transport minister who turned a blind eye to unconscionable practices against tenants by the airport leaseholders. He condoned big business trampling all over small businesses. And talking of hypocrisy it was his mate Garrett who approved the bulldozers to destroy hundreds of acres of endangered wildlife habitat.




David Young Imagine the headline in 30 years time! Nothing like history repeating itself!



Klaus Herrmann Not sure how that is in line with AOPAs guidelines

Quote:Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Australia Appreciate your comment Klaus Herrmann, however, would you agree that holding our political leaders - from all sides of government - to account for what they say and what they do, is very much in-line with protecting our collective freedom to fly?

The privatisation of Australia's general aviation airports has inflicted significant damage on our industry and aviation economy, and continues to do so unabated.

For many within the industry, it's too late, having been destroyed through unsustainable increases in rents, fees and charges, that have skyrocketed since privatisation some 20 years ago.

Over the past two decades, during a time that thousands of industry participants wrote to and called on our various Minister's for Transport - of which the Hon Anthony Albanese MP was one of, where were the strong voices of opposition to privatisation then? Where were the calls to protect the interests of Australian's dependent on access to our airport assets?

Both sides of government have ignored the warnings and pleas of our industry, with countless businesses and individuals driven broke and out of aviation entirely.

Both sides have been almost silent with respect to the damage inflicted and neither have stood up to the privatised profiteering and financial rape we have all been subjected to.

Australia's airports are very much a national asset, and aircraft owners and pilots have been alienated from their access and use - all in the interests of corporate profits.

Like Sydney Harbour and a vast array of other community and public infrastructure, our airports are a precious resource too and they should NEVER have been allowed to become the play-thing that they now are for profit-hungry privatised owners.

AOPA Australia is proudly standing up for our industry and highlighting the political hypocrisy which we are enduring.

BENJAMIN MORGAN
CEO | AOPA Australia

Plus:

SENATOR REX PATRICK: WHYALLA AND PORT LINCOLN AIR ROUTES AT RISK

Two weeks ago the Minister for Home Affairs, Peter Dutton, tabled a regulation in the Parliament that will require metal and x-ray screenings at Port Lincoln and Whyalla airports. The Government will pay the one off equipment purchase costs, but not the ongoing operating costs.



The consequence of this regulation will be that local council will have to pay approx $700,000 per annum to operate the equipment. Undoubtedly, the council will pass on these costs to airlines servicing the two locations.

“The new security regulations are guaranteed to drive up the cost of air travel for those needing access to Whyalla and Port Lincoln, and will also result in higher airport user fees and charges for general aviation users as airport operators scramble to recover their losses”, AOPA Australia CEO Benjamin Morgan.

“Government is dumping the problem of national security onto local councils, with no regard as to how these costs will be recovered. The Government needs to take responsibility for these security costs,” he said.


Regional Express and Qantas have told a Senate committee in the last parliament that these costs will make some routes economically unviable for passengers. Qantas mentioned Port Lincoln and Whyalla specifically saying that the Government “would put in jeopardy those services entirely”.


South Australian Senator, Rex Patrick, has moved a dis-allowance motion in the Senate to stop the screening going ahead until the Government agrees to cover the operation costs. The Senate will vote on the matter on 12 May.


“National security measures are national costs, not council costs. I’m hoping Labor supports me in the disallowance. I’m also hoping local Federal MP Rowan Ramsey will do his job and put loyalty to his constituents ahead of his loyalty to the Liberal party.” Senator Rex Patrick.


“Federal legislation that could see the Whyalla Airport saddled with up to $700,000 in on-going operational costs has been tabled in Parliament.” he said.



Quote:[Image: 86354047_23844368751160585_4962372468967...e=5EFD4A22]

Cost crisis for regional airports




MTF...P2  Tongue
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AOPA Oz recent regional airport advocacy activities -  Wink

Via FB:




Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Australia
10 March at 20:08

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https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%...WHknfH16wA


ARMIDALE COUNCIL CEO TARGETED IN VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE

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60 Armidale Regional Council staff members have turned on the board's CEO, Susan Law, and other management. The group cast a vote of no confidence during a routine meeting with the United Services Union.

https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%...L9y4B5rcJw


Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Australia
10 March at 16:44 ·
ARMIDALE AERO CLUB REPORT

AOPA Australia Members & Supporters,

Our association is proud to be standing in full support of the Armidale Aero Club in opposing unsustainable increases in leasehold rent!

The Australian tax-payer has gifted the Armidale Regional Council with some $13 million in federal and state government grants for its airport.

This investment by the Australian people was to improve access for the local community, but now council is demanding users pay more!

Justifying its demands for higher rents, the council states that the tax-payer funded $13 million in improvements have elevated the airports real-estate value, arguing the council must now seek higher returns from users.

Having refused to accept the council demands for a 462% in rent, the council issued an eviction notice to the Aero Club, which following strong media and community backlash was withdrawn yesterday.

The Armidale Regional Council has sought to bully the Aero Club, seeking to intimidate the community not-for-profit into submission.

Prior to today’s crisis meeting (held at the Aero Club at Armidale Airport) the council submitted a last minute revised lease which fails to take into genuine consideration the value of the community Aero Club to the Armidale region.

For 80 years the club has served to promote Armidale and to encourage aviation commerce and participation to the benefit of the local community. The club is an integral part of aviation safety, facilitating pilot mentoring and safety awareness. The club has funded its own facilities, which are made available to other local interest and charity groups.

I would like to thank the Councillors who attended today’s meeting, clearly demonstrating their support for local aviation. I commend the Councillors for standing up for community and offer them our full support.

I would like to thank the Armidale Aero Club for the opportunity to speak to the meeting and will be returning to speak before the next Council meeting.

More on this as it develops.

BENJAMIN MORGAN
CEO AOPA AUSTRALIA
Mobile: 0415 577 724

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Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Australia
9 March at 17:26 ·
AOPA AUSTRALIA: WATCH THE CENTRAL COAST COUNCIL MEETING LIVE

NOT A MEMBER? WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT
Join today: www.aopa.com.au/membership

(From 01hr25min)





Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Australia
9 March at 13:03 ·

Maryborough Aero Club
9 March at 10:35 ·
Published Mar 25, 2019 4:02 PM maybe a year old but credible person in CEO of AOPA Ben Morgan ...Australia has been too long relying on its luck...Time to get smart.or be subservient to the rest of the world.

https://omny.fm/shows/ben-fordham-full-s...gQhQPvSgsM





MTF...P2 Tongue
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Via AOPA Oz Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/AOPAaustralia/posts/


AOPA AUSTRALIA SPEAKS WITH PRIME7 NEWS, AVIATION INDUSTRY SUPPORT PACKAGE.

Many thanks to Jeremy Frost of Prime7 News (Wagga Wagga) for the opportunity to discuss the Government aviation industry support package, announced by Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack.

"Whilst I commend the Government for extending some $1billion in assistance to Qantas, Virgin and Regional Express, the vast majority of Australia's general aviation industry is being devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Australia's aviation industry comprises of much more than just our international, domestic and regional airlines, all of which need a healthy general aviation industry to function.

"General aviation charter, flight training, maintenance and the broader aviation supply chain are all at risk as the pandemic continues.
"Australia's general aviation sectors require urgent clear advice from Government, detailing what assistance is available to them and how they apply. This information is needed urgently."


BENJAMIN MORGAN
AOPA Australia | CEO

NOT A MEMBER? WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT!
Join today: www.aopa.com.au/membership


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AOPA Australia | Your Freedom to Fly




MTF,,,P2  Tongue
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The relevance or irrelevance of local councils.

Australian Councils are an anachronistic leftover from British traditions probably refined over the centuries from the old feudal system of governance, the “Lord of the Manour”etc.
With the advent of democracy the local council became the arbiter of purely civil local issues.

We hold Local councils out to be part of a democratic process, but are they really?

How many of us actually know who their local council is? How many of us have actually met a councillor? How many of us know who the Mayor is?

Perhaps in small country towns some would, but in huge cities, even the big regional centres I doubt very few do.

In the modern world, increasingly, councils as all bureaucracy’s do, have expanded into very expensive entities, their core functions becoming buried in a plethora of issues with little relevance to the rate payers, who really only want their garbage collected and their roads repaired.

I very much doubt many people seek election to councils with altruistic motives of civic duty, for the vast majority I believe being a member of council is largely a self interest activity.

How many view being a councillor as a stepping stone to higher office in the political spectrum, rather than serving the needs of ratepayers?

How many councillors are political activists who view local council as a way of imposing their particular political agenda’s or beliefs?

How many councillors are property developers, or affiliated with them with a view to profit?

How many councils govern in the local interest?

How many citizens of this country view local councils as corrupt?

After CASA, the so called privatisation of Airports has been the greatest disaster to befall aviation in Australia.

Airports were once viewed as vital pieces of national infrastructure.

In the modern world they are viewed as monopoly cash cow’s, prime real estate ripe for development or from a local council perspective an inconvenient liability.

CASA killed off the general aviation side of the aviation industry in much the same manner that Europe did by over regulation, destroying the aviation related cottage industries that supported country airports. If these airports are finally closed because local council’s see no intrinsic value to their constituents, they are gone forever and the mantle of the tyranny of distance once again adds a nail in the coffin of rural Australia.

The oft heard mantra the user must pay is trotted out by various councils to account for draconian charges they attempt to retrieve from users of their airports and at the same time impose draconian restrictions on the airports usage, defeating the whole point of the airports being in the first place, as a convenient useable public utility.

In Armidale’s case, there is some general aviation activity at their airport and they are lucky enough to have an RPT service as well. As with all commercial activity there is always a limit to what users can pay in terms of fees. Set that bar too high and businesses start looking for alternatives or close their doors. By driving general aviation off their airport Armidale council chooses to ignore the fact that those users are local rate payers, the jobs they provide feed funds into the local community. If GA is gone and the user must pay the costs will get passed to the RPT sector which in turn gets passed on in the price of a ticket with the added risk of airlines pulling out of servicing the town as buyer resistance to sky high regional fares diminishes passenger numbers.

The whole airport privatisation fraud will come back to bite us one day, once airports are gone, short of another war, they will be gone forever along with the collapse of rural Australia.

Work has started at Bankstown airport on stage one of the ulitimate master plan to close the airport to all but rotary wing. Once the Airport lease was passed illegally to State Super
(The airport Act Prohibits a trust from owning an airport) it was always going to happen.
Their development arm which illegally operates the airport (the airports act prohibits a property developer from running an airport) has the earth movers in, spreading asbestos contaminated dust and PFAS residue across the suburbs. On the northern side the whole precinct from the high flyer to the terminal is slated for demolition to make way for further industrial development. Sad, but reality, you cant beat the big end of town. When such huge amounts of money can be made governments are prepared to turn a blind eye to the law and the breach of their lease provisions.
Reply

AOPA Oz busy in isolation -  Wink

From BM:




AOPA AUSTRALIA LAUNCHES ‘CHARTER & FLIGHT TRAINING AND MAINTENANCE INDUSTRY ADVISORY GROUPS’

April 9, 2020 By Nicholas Christie

AOPA Australia Digital Editor NICHOLAS CHRISTIE reports.
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With the Commonwealth Government’s focus perceived to be squarely on the survival of our major airlines, thousands of General Aviation businesses across Australia are left with challenges that are both unprecedented, and potentially devastating. Now, AOPA Australia has announced the creation of the ‘AOPA Australia Charter & Flight Training Industry Advisory Group’, to give an ‘urgent, single voice’ to an industry fighting for its very existence.

The group will consist of broad-based representation across all sectors of GA, including flight training organisations (including RAAus schools), charter operators and maintenance organisations to bring together a package of urgent, medium term and ongoing reforms to help save the arguably far less public face of aviation, from collapse.


“It has been recognised by AOPA Australia that there has been a gap in the representation of General Aviation, particularly at this time. We recognise that the Government has been focused on the airlines, but that the grass roots of our aviation industry in Australia urgently needs a single voice”, said Benjamin Morgan, CEO of AOPA Australia.

“This is the first time in Australia’s General Aviation history that we can claim to witness GA operators of all types coming together, willing to support a representative body. This move should ignite an understanding of the gravity of the situation that GA finds itself in; not just because of the COVID-19 situation. This is something that has been brewing for close to a decade”.

“We understand that operators have their hands full currently, but I’m looking forward to ensuring that the needs of the sector is communicated quickly – and thanks in advance needs to go to our panel members for giving up their time during a difficult period”, he said.


[Image: IMG_20180530_175943.jpg]

ABOVE: AOPA Australia’s advisory group recommendations will be submitted to Deputy Prime Minister & Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Regional Development, The Hon Michael McCormack within weeks.

With the need for a breadth of experience across a wide range of disciplines, AOPA Australia will assemble a team co-chaired by Executive Corporate Partner and Senior Base Manager at Panorama Airways, Ms Tammy Camilleri and RAAus Board Member & Flight School operator, Mr Alan Middleton.

According to AOPA Australia, both individuals are respected industry experts with a deep understanding of the regulatory and operational environment in GA and recreational aviation in Australia – and of the short and longer-term needs of the industry more broadly.

“I am looking forward to working with my co-chair Alan Middleton, in seeking to understand the concerns of our charter and flight training industry partners.  Through the AOPA Australia panel, i hope that we can quickly be position to help provide clear guidance and advice.  I join Ben in warmly inviting our charter and flight training colleagues to participate in this initiative.”, said Mrs Tammy Camilleri.

“Politicians and hard-working bureaucrats need to be confident that they are receiving policy advice that meaningfully and accurately reflects the needs of all aviation participants.  I look forward to working with AOPA Australia and Tammy in assisting our industry.”, said Mr Middleton.

“We want to take a great deal of care in providing Government the best advice and menu of options – and that can only come from discussions that represent the many, and varied, industry groups. The advice going to Government currently is in danger of being piecemeal – and not sufficiently broadly based to be described as a reliable and targeted set of policy directions. The establishment of this group has come about on the perception that General Aviation has been less than properly and fully represented.” said Mrs Camilleri.

The group recommendations will be submitted to the Deputy Prime Minister, Michael McCormack for review and consideration, to members of Parliament and will be made available to members of the public.


Charter, flight training and maintenance organisations are invited to register their participation, to the following contacts;

Tammy Camelleri
Chairperson – Charter & Flight Training Advisory Group
AOPA Australia
Email: tam.camerlleri@aopa.com.au
Mobile: 0409 868 380

Alan Middleton
Chairperson – Recreational Flight Training Advisory Group
AOPA Australia
Email: alan.middleton@aopa.com.au
Mobile:
 0407 356 948

Ken Cannane
Chairperson – Maintenance Industry Advisory Group
AOPA Australia
Email: ken.cannane@aopa.com.au
Mobile:
 0408 029 329





Next:
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AOPA AUSTRALIA SPEAKS WITH CANBERRA MIX106.3FM

Many thanks to the team from Mix 106.3 FM for the opportunity to speak about the closure of the Canberra Airport cross runway 12/30.

The interview will broadcast tomorrow, friday 10th April 2020.

Finally:

Quote:AOPA AUSTRALIA SPEAKS WITH AUSTRALIAN AVIATION

While the federal government has responded to the airline sector with billions of dollars’ worth of support, the struggle of small aviation businesses through the devastating COVID-19 crisis remain largely unrecognised. Businesses that were already financially strained due to the cost of keeping up with existing regulation are now in even direr straights.

Chief executive of Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Benjamin Morgan joins host Phil Tarrant and Christian “Boo” Boucousis to delve into the crippling effect of coronavirus on the Australian aviation industry as a whole and outline the action that needs to be taken by the government and these smaller businesses to gear them up for recovery when the current situation dissipates.

On this episode, Benjamin also unpacks the somewhat unsavoury motivation behind the recent closure of a Canberra Airport cross runway and how it is reflective of a wider issue that is pervading the Australian airport sector.

[Image: safe_image.php?d=AQDz2-ncB0c1sV5F&w=540&...zjLJgGIy7Y]

Ref: https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%...RwoPUbMlVA

&/or https://australianaviation.com.au/2020/0..._6-UpzISSw

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BM comes out swinging on CASA's ineptitude on Tallawara B -  Rolleyes  

Via Oz Flying:
Quote: [Image: tallawarra.jpg]

CASA comes under Fire over Power Station Approval
14 April 2020
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The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has drawn criticism from AOPA Australia for approving an aviation impact assessment for the proposed Tallawarra B power station.


Last week, Energy Australia was granted planning approval for an open cycle gas turbine power station to be built in the circuit area of Shellharbour Airport after CASA accepted a gas plume velocity of 6.1 m/s at 700 feet as being safe.


Previously, AOPA Australia had calculated that a plume velocity of only 4.3 m/s would be needed to ensure the plume presented no danger to GA and recreational aircraft.


"AOPA Australia are deeply concerned that CASA have created a risk to the safety of aviation at Shellharbour Airport by their prime decision that a 6.1 m/s plume velocity at 700 feet AGL is an acceptable safety yardstick for the Tallawarra B project," AOPA CEO Ben Morgan said in a letter addressed to CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody.


"AOPA Australia have presented CASA [with] calculations, using approved data from the Pilot Operating Handbook of the ubiquitous Cessna 172N, that show 4.3 m/s is the maximum critical plume velocity for any such assessment related to any plume within the circuit at Shellharbour Airport.


"Would you please explain how CASA concluded that a plume with a velocity of 6.1 m/s at 700 feet AGL within the circuit at Shellharbour Airport does not pose a risk to the safety of aviation?"


Morgan crticised CASA for approving the gas plume velocity based on what it says is a potential design and not the final design for the power station. Energy Australia put forward an engineering solution in the aviation impact assessment that was designed specifically to reduce the plume velocity.


Morgan said that AOPA was disappointed that CASA reviewed the assessment "behind closed doors, ignoring the input of the aviation community" and accused the regulator of then "wiping its hands" of the outcome.
Energy Australia plans to commission Tallawarra B in the summer of 2022-23.

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[Image: Acting-Prime-Minister-Michael-McCormack-...424808.jpg]
Ref: https://auntypru.com/sbg-12-04-20-as-time-goes-by/

(04-15-2020, 09:48 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  BM comes out swinging on CASA's ineptitude on Tallawara B -  Rolleyes  

Via Oz Flying:
Quote: [Image: tallawarra.jpg]

CASA comes under Fire over Power Station Approval
14 April 2020
Comments 0 Comments

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has drawn criticism from AOPA Australia for approving an aviation impact assessment for the proposed Tallawarra B power station.


Last week, Energy Australia was granted planning approval for an open cycle gas turbine power station to be built in the circuit area of Shellharbour Airport after CASA accepted a gas plume velocity of 6.1 m/s at 700 feet as being safe.


Previously, AOPA Australia had calculated that a plume velocity of only 4.3 m/s would be needed to ensure the plume presented no danger to GA and recreational aircraft.


"AOPA Australia are deeply concerned that CASA have created a risk to the safety of aviation at Shellharbour Airport by their prime decision that a 6.1 m/s plume velocity at 700 feet AGL is an acceptable safety yardstick for the Tallawarra B project," AOPA CEO Ben Morgan said in a letter addressed to CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody.


"AOPA Australia have presented CASA [with] calculations, using approved data from the Pilot Operating Handbook of the ubiquitous Cessna 172N, that show 4.3 m/s is the maximum critical plume velocity for any such assessment related to any plume within the circuit at Shellharbour Airport.


"Would you please explain how CASA concluded that a plume with a velocity of 6.1 m/s at 700 feet AGL within the circuit at Shellharbour Airport does not pose a risk to the safety of aviation?"


Morgan crticised CASA for approving the gas plume velocity based on what it says is a potential design and not the final design for the power station. Energy Australia put forward an engineering solution in the aviation impact assessment that was designed specifically to reduce the plume velocity.


Morgan said that AOPA was disappointed that CASA reviewed the assessment "behind closed doors, ignoring the input of the aviation community" and accused the regulator of then "wiping its hands" of the outcome.
Energy Australia plans to commission Tallawarra B in the summer of 2022-23.

Dear Mick Mack - L&Ks BM  Rolleyes



 AOPA AUSTRALIA | CASA CREATION OF A SIGNIFICANT RISK TO AVIATION SAFETY - SHELLHARBOUR / WOLLONGONG AIRPORT, NSW

16th April 2020
The Hon Michael McCormack MP
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
PO BOX 6022, House of Representatives
Parliament House
Canberra ACT 2600, Australia


Mr Shane Carmody
Director of Aviation Safety
Civil Aviation Safety Authority
GPO BOX 2005
Canberra ACT 2601, Australia


Mr Chris Monahan
Executive Manager, National Operations and Standards
Civil Aviation Safety Authority


Deputy Prime Minister,

I write to you on behalf of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia (AOPA Australia), seeking your direct response regarding the Civil Aviation Safety Authority’s creation of a significant risk to aviation safety at YWOL in New South Wales, as a result of the proposed Energy Australia Tallawarra B open cycle gas turbine facility.

CASA recently determined that construction of an open cycle gas turbine electricity generation plant at Tallawarra, known as Tallawarra B, producing a plume with a vertical velocity of 6.1 m/s at 700 feet above ground level, within the circuit of Shellharbour Airport, does not pose a risk to the safety of aviation – a decision that directly contradicts aircraft manufacturers hard data that demonstrates such levels to be unsafe.

Do you consent to CASA creating this significant risk to aviation safety at Shellharbour Airport (YSHL), where there is currently none?
AOPA Australia understands that you, and all of government, are extremely busy at this time of crisis for our country, and indeed, the world. Therefore, we strongly recommend that you stay the CASA decision to proceed with the construction of this open cycle gas turbine at Tallawarra, in the circuit of Shellharbour Airport, until Government and industry have time to properly review this incorrect safety assessment by CASA.

AOPA Australia and the aviation community are feeling considerably frustrated by CASA on this matter. AOPA Australia presented hard evidence to Energy Australia and CASA, using approved data from the pilot operating handbook of the ubiquitous Cessna 172, to show that even a plume rise with a vertical velocity of 4.3 m/s poses a risk to light aircraft arriving at or departing from Shellharbour Airport. NSW Planning are aware of our concern on this matter.

Aircraft manufacturers data show that a plume with a vertical velocity of 6.1 m/s will stall the wings of the following aircraft in the circuit of Shellharbour Airport – The Cessna 172N, the Piper Archer II, the Jabiru J160, the Foxbat A22 and A22LS. All these aircraft types frequently use Shellharbour Airport. If the wings of an aircraft are stalled, the pilot risks losing control of the aircraft, and aircraft loss of control at circuit height and below invariably results in a fatal accident.

Do you consent to CASA creating this significant risk to aviation safety at Shellharbour Airport (YSHL), where there is currently none?
CASR 1998 regulation 139.370 makes it very clear that “CASA may determine, in writing, that a gaseous efflux having a velocity exceeding 4.3 metres per second is, or will be, a hazard to aircraft operations because of the velocity or location of the efflux.”

Advisory Circular AC 139-05 (0) – Guidelines for Conducting Plume Rise Assessments” was the AC current at the time of conditional approval of Tallawarra B, the condition being that the plume not pose a risk to the safety of aviation.

AC 139-05 (0) is quite clear about the risk a plume with vertical velocity of 4.3 m/s poses to aircraft arriving at or departing from an airport. AC 139-05 (0) states:

“2.2 CASA has identified that there is a need to assess the potential hazards to aviation because the vertical velocity from gas efflux may cause airframe damage and/or affect the handling characteristics of an aircraft in flight.

2.3 The stability of an aircraft is especially critical during periods of high pilot workload, such as when the aircraft is being manoeuvred at low altitudes with flaps extended and/or gear down.

Typically, this includes the initial take-off climb and the approach to land - when the
aircraft is in the vicinity of an aerodrome.”


AC 139-05 (0) goes on to say:

“4.2 Aviation authorities have established that an exhaust plume with a vertical gust in excess of 4.3 metres/second (m/s) may cause damage to an aircraft airframe, or upset an aircraft when flying at low levels.

4.3 Low level flying operations are typically conducted during: approach, landing and take-off”

CASA updated the advisory circular on this matter twice during the period of debate over the risk this project poses to the safety of aviation,
the last time in Jan 2019. AOPA Australia finds it incomprehensible that in this most recent update, CASA changed the need for a proponent of any such project to even have to discuss the matter with CASA or anybody else if the proponent’s calculations show that the plume generated has a velocity less than 6.1 m/s. This change was made without the presentation of a safety case, or explanation to the aviation community of what had changed to cause this shift in CASA’s thinking. More importantly, this change opened the way forward for the Tallawarra B facility.

Do you consent to the changes CASA have made to Advisory Circular AC-139-05 (3), creating a significant risk to aviation safety and directly contradicting aircraft manufacturer data?

AOPA Australia opposes the assessment CASA has made to determine that a plume with a vertical velocity of 6.1 m/s does not pose a risk to the safety of aviation – as it directly contradicts aircraft manufacturer data.

AOPA Australia’s calculations, using approved data from pilot operating handbooks, demonstrate that even a plume with vertical velocity of 4.3 m/s poses a risk to the safety of light aircraft arriving at, departing from, or training within the circuit of Shellharbour Airport. Energy Australia and CASA were presented with these calculations by AOPA Australia, prior to CASA’s decision on Energy Australia’s Aviation Impact Assessment on this matter to CASA. This advice is attached for your information.

It is CASA’s role to protect the aviation ecosystem, protecting those who are most vulnerable and in many ways, unable to protect themselves. CASA’s decision on this matter not only fails to protect the aviation ecosystem, it creates a risk to the safety of aviation that currently does not exist.

As our Minister responsible for Aviation, would you please enforce a stay on the implementation of this decision until Government and Industry have been afforded appropriate time to properly asses the risks that this project poses to the safety of aviation, as it is simply too late once it has been built?

Thank you for your consideration on this matter.

Yours Sincerely,

BENJAMIN MORGAN
Chief Executive Officer

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia (AOPA Australia) 




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