2016 Election & GA?- Policies not platitudes
#81

At last! 

A news service we can trust – highly recommended – must read – everyday.

HERE-
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#82

(06-06-2016, 12:32 PM)Peetwo Wrote:  KISS or don't bother - Dodgy

Excellent post "K" and it is the bit that the Alphabets & industry advocates constantly sadly seem to forget, in order to engage 'Joe Public' you need to keep it (the message) simple stupid.. Undecided

Quote:Skidmore's belligerent stance on ADSB

This bollocks from Skidmore prompted NX to forward to Ben Morgan this message the following day:
Quote: Wrote:Nick Xenophon to fight for Aviation!




I’m sorry I can’t be here today to support you in your fight for a fair go.

Just last night in a Senate Committee I asked CASA director Mr Skidmore why the ADSB requirement could not be delayed until 2021. Mr Skidmore said it would not be delayed, and it may well be cheaper to implement now.

I do not accept this.

I will not stand by and see general aviation being destroyed in Australia with a measure that will have counterproductive effects on safety, as more and more pilots will be forced to fly visually because of the ADSB costs.

I will do everything I can to reverse this destructive requirement, and if I’m back in the senate after July 2, I will move to have this requirement delayed until at least 2021.

Australia needs a strong, viable, general aviation industry – I will work with you, and fight for you in the Federal Parliament to make sure your industry thrives and prospers.

Karina Natt | Media Adviser | Office of Nick Xenophon, Independent Senator for South Australia

Lvl 2/31 Ebenezer Place, Adelaide | M: 0433 620 850 I TEL: 08 8232 1144 I F: 08 8232 3744 www.nickxenophon.com.au

When this was announced at the Tamworth rally there was loud cheers & a chant for Nick for PM - [Image: biggrin.gif]

Tony Windsor tweeted this:


[Image: TW-NX-4-PM.jpg]
   

If it wasn't for Nick Xenophon banging the drum for GA (above) and giving a glint of hope that the issues currently being obfuscated (i.e. regulatory reform, ASRR etc.), will eventually get some attention, IMO the industry will be 'dead, buried & cremated' by this time next year.

It is all well & good to have closed door discussions on aviation policy with the bureaucracy promising to make changes and implement reform. However as 28 years of so called regulatory & regulator reform consistently highlights, such commitments made by bureaucrats are just 'weasel words'. And unless these commitments are consistently reviewed & pressured by a committed executive government, that in turn is pressured politically by committed & informed public opinion, then it will all be for nought, - so ABCs KISS!

Quote:So, what to do? Well, perhaps we have a weapon.  I humbly recommend the Senate Pel-Air Inquiry and the subsequent Forsyth review for consideration.  Do the public and politicians understand the deep significance of these two very important documents; I mean really understand it.

I think not. There are at least 60 serious, significant, far reaching, clearly enunciated recommendations within those documents.  None of which have been honestly embraced, let alone implemented.  Sure, we have the latest window dressing and floral displays, much in the way of rhetoric and lip service; but we are a beggar man when it comes to real, demonstrated, meaningful change.  

This lack of will from the departments is not only denying that problems exist but deceiving the public into believing all is well.  It is not; this denial is not only eroding the standards, but by denying the very real, urgent need for material, quantifiable change; without which, the risks to the safety of the travelling public are increasing.  It really is that simple; IMO the industry needs to get this simple message out to the public, who vote; not the politicians.  Unless ‘we’ make it an election issue, you can bet your boots and nav bag – no one else will.


Ironically Nick Xenophon is also singing from the same hymn sheet. Courtesy of the NXT website there is a Policy Principles page and under 'Aviation' it states...

"...Implement recommendations from Senate reports on aviation and safety..." 

So Nick gets it, he also gets the "Reason" causal chain concept and where we currently are at in effective aviation safety risk mitigation.  However as the "K" post clearly highlights, unfortunately 'Joe Public' is essentially oblivious to the dire state of affairs of aviation safety in this country and that they deserve much better.

Other than graphic advertisements with crashed airliners burning, how do we get this message across?

Have just posted the following on Planetalking:
Quote:Shame that this abysmal ATSB final report was released while you were OS. A cynical observer would think, that along with releasing during an election campaign, that Chief Commissioner Dolan (& the powers to be) purposely do this as a form of bureaucratic obfuscation, as the previous update had predicted an end of June release of the final report.


Fortunately other diligent & professional industry participants have not let this significant aviation occurrence – that was quite literally minutes away from being the worst Australian aviation disaster in history – slide into the bureaucratic aviation safety (Swiss Cheese) archives of obfuscation.

And from Slippery Pete:
Quote:“…This report is a complete joke.

 
Quote:The discussions here so far have missed the main point of this incident. I find a lot of similarities with the ATSBs handling of the disgraced Norfolk Is investigation and report on this incident. In both cases the ATSB has deliberately attempted to deflect any blame from BoM, CASA, Airsevices or any other government agency and has tried, and failed, to blame the crew

Completely agree. Government departments spending three years getting each others’ backsides covered before finally releasing the report and hanging the crew out to dry. Same as Pelair.

1. The report doesn’t place enough emphasis on the seriousness. Had one or both of these aircraft’s automation not tracked the RNAV so accurately, we could have been looking at hundreds of dead bodies. This was a deadly serious occurrence where the last piece of cheese which saved the day was pot luck.

2. The elephant in the room was completely avoided – still CASA allows RPT to plan to a remote single runway destination.

3. The quality of the forecasts has dropped so much in twenty years. BoM understaffed – quite possibly, but get it fixed. I don’t expect forecasts to be 100% all of the time, but last five years they’ve been a joke. “Fog forecasting is hard” in the report… No ****!!! But they used to get it right twenty years ago, why not now?

4. How long was the VOR AWIS not repaired? “Months” is the rumour I heard the other day. Why wasn’t it fixed? Why did it happen to get fixed within a day of the incident occurring? Why didn’t the ATSB mention this? What a huge cover up!! Had it been working, at TOPC out of Adelaide, the crew would have tuned in and realised Mildura was turning to crap. They could have turned around and done an autoland. FIX YOUR EQUIPMENT, ASA. This is why airports are forced to install their own AWIS VHF – ASA don’t want the liability and cost of maintaining navaid AWIS, they’re washing their hands of it.

5. Why do we only have one cat III ILS in the entire country? Mildura takes bunch of high capacity RPT every day. Why doesn’t it have at least one or two ILS?

ATSB – complete joke, have lost all respect, in bed with regulator.
BOM – give them the money they need to get the forecasts right
ASA – stop wasting money on bullshit and spend it on infrastructure, like ILS and AWIS and maintenance.

Pilots – do exactly what we were doing thirty years ago, with half the support, half the navaids, half the fuel – with the knowledge that if all the holes line up, you’ll get hung out to dry by the ATSB…”

Enough said for now…P2

Reference Aunty Pru threads: http://auntypru.com/forum/-Overdue-and-Obfuscated?pid=4421#pid4421 & http://auntypru.com/forum/-Shame-or-fame-for-Chester?pid=4416#pid4416
  
Okay so taking Pete's post above, if we take out the aviation jargon, acronyms etc. there is a fairly blunt clear message in there.

Other examples of a KISS message that Joe public should be able to relate is in some of the
 better comments from Sandy's petition - see HERE:
Quote:General Aviation is the lifeblood of the Australian bush and the thousands of remote communities that depend on it for their very survival. It bonds so much of our country together and provides irreplaceable services such as Search & Rescue, Air Ambulance, The Flying Doctor and Angel Flight. It is slowly and traumatically being strangled by unchecked bureaucracy gone mad. CASA is an out-of-control regulate-till-everything-stops monster that's determined to realise their ultimate aim - the only safe light aircraft is one that never flies. Truly a travesty when we have the best weather in the world, unlimited space for flying training and some of the most experience instructors, charter pilots, licensed aircraft mechanical engineers and air traffic controllers in the world. Please share this to help spread the word that this industry (which should be absolutely flourishing) is dying at the hands of disastrous over-regulation and unworkable legislation.
 And in the sound bites from the Tamworth Rally courtesy of ABC local radio :   
Quote:Jandakot Airport & the JACC, DoIRD showdown - Here we go again [Image: undecided.gif]

Warren Evans from the Jandakot Airport Chamber of Commerce (JACC) IMO can be regarded as an aviation logistics expert. Mr Evans was one of the many (300+) General Aviation stakeholders that made the trek (in his case very long trek) to Tamworth in order to voice their concerns and get a feel for what are the Nationals (if voted back in - Coalition Government) policy intentions for the promotion/survival of the GA industry.

Here is what Mr Evans said to ABC Radio New England at the Tamworth rally (from 00:27 to 01:51 min):
(05-12-2016, 08:37 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Wrote:To follow on from the Sunny posted observations, here is three audio segments from last Monday's Kelly Fuller (ABC New England) radio breakfast show:
Quote: Wrote:[Image: Untitled_Clipping_051216_083038_PM.jpg]

The aviation industry says it's going to the wall because of over regulations by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Around 300 pilots and members of the industry met with Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and the Minister for Transport Darren Chester on Friday afternoon to raise their concerns.

Tamworth Aviation Protest 

A follow up from Sunfish no less - Big Grin

Quote:you guys still don't get it.

you guys still don't get it.

you are using the wrong model of political processes.

That is: make noise>>>media listens>>>media broadcasts>>>voters listen>>>politicians listen>>>government makes CASA change.

This fails at every level for reasons I and others have patiently explained before, to whit:

1.The media are overwhelmed with people clamouring to be heard, GA is not sufficiently newsworthy.

2. The general public are not listening, there are too many messages.

3. politicians ignore voters except in marginal seats.

4. GA and aviation regulation is about as popular with government as prison reform, it s safer for governments to let CASA go its merry way.

Here's an idea; I live in the electorate of Indi. it's held by an independent, Cathy McGowan. She took it from Tony Abbots darling Sophie Mirabella who is standing again. It's going to be a tight race this time again. why not spend your energy working to keep Sophie out and do the same in every marginal seat held by the government until they finally react?

can you raise enough resources to letter drop Benalla, Shepparton, Wangaratta with a message about jobs investment and growth in aviation in those areas and a plea to vote for Cathy? Wang airport is partially closed, the flying club and school are gone for subjects for starters, Mansfield can't get permission to build hangars thanks to NIMBYs, what are the issues at Shep and Benalla?????

This is a simpler model: threaten politicians re-election prospects>>>politicians kick CASA in the ass.

Oh well...you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink...P2 Tongue
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#83

The really long post, from the long post master P2 – HERE – combined with the post above has to bring aviation, well airports and their infrastructure at least to the fore as an election issue of national importance; alas, they hardly rate a mention...... Angry  

If ever a ‘topic’ of national interest deserved a Royal Commission it has to be ‘airports’.  The ToR would need to written by anyone but the department, someone completely independent, preferably form another country, beyond the long reach of the vested interests.  Then the lid of one of the biggest buckets of worms Australia has ever owned could be well an truly removed.  It will take a decade to clean up the filth which will spill from that bucket.  Both sides of politics’ have been aware of the pollution problems and yet the ‘Greens’ who should have it as a major election platform choose not to say a ducking word about pollution of the water table, fishing grounds or even the two headed ducks which glow in the dark on a waterway near them.  WTF.

Then there is the ‘sale’ of aerodromes to developers and the associated ‘deals’ which may well make some rich, but beggar the nation of industry, employment and much needed income.  WTF.

Pollution. Corruption and Recession not on the election agenda.  Aye, but we’ll always have Darren, perhaps he could self ‘seflie’ himself onto a ballot paper, then he need not draw a picture of a prick.  Fair dinkum, WTF are these idiots playing at; and, more to the point, what the hell are we paying for?

Toot - I hate politics [1] - toot.
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#84

Obfuscation is the best (and only) policy.

Picking up on the P2 post - HERE -

Quote:MdS - “Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) President Marc De Stoop has called for the major political parties to reveal their policies on general aviation ahead of the 2 July Federal Election.

When a matter like polluted waterways raises it’s ugly head; you could, quite reasonably, expect a party like “the Greens” to have somewhat to say about it and a ‘policy’ related to matters aeronautical, even as a side bar.  Green Silence.

When matters like the Pel-Air debacle or the great Mildura fog duck up happen ; you could, quite reasonably, expect the ‘minister’ responsible to pay a little attention to the billions wasted and show a modicum of concern for the lives of the Australian travelling public.  An aviation policy which encompassed the reforms and the dreadful state of aviation, even in broad strokes , would go a long way to encourage people to vote.  Ministerial selfies and SFA else from the government minister.

When matters like the loss of trade skills, apprenticeships and a blue collar industry jobs are on the line, you could, quite reasonably, expect the ‘labor’ crew to look at a policy which ensured at least that the working man had bread to put on the table.  No aircraft noise is the only song old Alby Back is singing.

The message is ridiculously simple:-

[Image: 13052016-Frog-s.jpg]
Courtesy of Larry Pickering – Pickering Post. (Cheers Larry).
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#85

Well, Barmybaby may well have been a good Senator, but his continuing ‘antics’ in his electorate should make Turnbull, the aviation lobby and the New England constituents pleased be shut of him.  His ‘performance’ at the Tamworth AOPA aviation rally left much to be desired, all expected the stock standard waffle and sanctimonious clap-trap telling how his poor little hands were tied, they were in ‘caretaker’ mode (that’s an oxymoron); but being told, essentially, we could all piss off,  that - was an error. 

No matter how much aggravation or shirt fronting was done by his voters, the concerns surrounding mining issues do generate some heat, however, treating the local ladies, as he did, publicly, in a local pub is not the behaviour I'd want from a DPM. – As deputy PM, you would expect better than the smug, non-answers delivered on the ABC Q&A session and certainly better discipline than telling yet another irate group of very concerned citizens to Piss off.

ABC - CSG      SMH - HERE – courtesy of the SMH and the ABC.  

NX for PM and Tony Windsor for New England.  How about you piss off Barmybaby; just piss off and get a job with some affluent city council – as a dog catcher; although the last ones did get away; didn’t they?  A bit out of your Depp there, were you.  Tosser....
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#86

Of gentle men.

I’ll own to having two Grandfathers: both different, but both so very similar.  One a ‘man of the land’ farmer, farrier, poacher, tickler of trout, a man belonging to the land, who could find Badger sets and explain to a cold, sleepy, very young “K” the ways of the wild wood and the creatures who made a life there.  Sometimes sailor, sometimes soldier, but always a craftsman.  T’uther was different; but same - same; only ‘harder’, a miner, soldier, unwilling sailor, clever craftsman and self educated.  Both were undoubtedly intelligent, both raised their families, as best they could – both, one way or another had their children educated as best they may, one even got a daughter to university (no small thing in those days).  In common, they both had a love for and respect from for their womenfolk, and both fully understood the value of that asset.  For indeed their women were, to them, an asset of great worth.  Both men could, would and did worked, fought and persevered, through some stern times for love of their womenfolk.  I was brought up by their children: they taught me the value of good manners, common decency and gentlemanly behaviour; along with a modicum of fear (wink) and huge respect (no wink) for ‘the ladies’.

So, WTF happened to all that?  I could not, nor would not routinely believe that a deputy prime minister, supposedly from a ‘rural’ background, would tell a group of ‘country women’ to Piss off, in any circumstances.  If, it was said ‘in jest’ or even in context – then sure, I could understand it.  But ol’ Barmybaby was neither joking nor continuing a line of ‘discussion’. A bad tempered bully? A coward? Or just plain, old fashioned ignorance and arrogance fuelled by ego.  All I suspect.  No matter, he may thank the gods it was the women, not men he spoke to in that gutless manner.  The way of the bully and coward.

Now what sort of man is that?  A supposed ‘leader’ of this nation, one who believes he can, with impunity, offer gross insult to mothers and wives who passionately; and, by the by, quite correctly believe that a certain thing is not what’s best for their land and families.  Who dares to tell our women to “piss off”; and, WTF does it say about an accountant who would, if he could, be king.  Disgraceful, UFB bad form.  Obviously he has no respect for the land, little love of country and is not; not by my measure a gentleman.  Let us see his arm against that of a farrier, his hand against that of a carpenter, his courage against that of a real fighter.  No chance, right.  His soft, little hands could not hold a candle against our country girls, let alone their men.

This country needs to tell Barmybaby and his fellow travellers, in no uncertain terms - to Bugger off and don’t come back. Not until he has learned some respect, manners; and, more importantly, how to duck a punch.  

Second the P7 motion – Piss off - Tosser.

Toot toot.
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#87

(06-10-2016, 11:13 PM)kharon Wrote:  Of gentle men.

I’ll own to having two Grandfathers: both different, but both so very similar.  One a ‘man of the land’ farmer, farrier, poacher, tickler of trout, a man belonging to the land, who could find Badger sets and explain to a cold, sleepy, very young “K” the ways of the wild wood and the creatures who made a life there.  Sometimes sailor, sometimes soldier, but always a craftsman.  T’uther was different; but same - same; only ‘harder’, a miner, soldier, unwilling sailor, clever craftsman and self educated.  Both were undoubtedly intelligent, both raised their families, as best they could – both, one way or another had their children educated as best they may, one even got a daughter to university (no small thing in those days).  In common, they both had a love for and respect from for their womenfolk, and both fully understood the value of that asset.  For indeed their women were, to them, an asset of great worth.  Both men could, would and did worked, fought and persevered, through some stern times for love of their womenfolk.  I was brought up by their children: they taught me the value of good manners, common decency and gentlemanly behaviour; along with a modicum of fear (wink) and huge respect (no wink) for ‘the ladies’.

So, WTF happened to all that?  I could not, nor would not routinely believe that a deputy prime minister, supposedly from a ‘rural’ background, would tell a group of ‘country women’ to Piss off, in any circumstances.  If, it was said ‘in jest’ or even in context – then sure, I could understand it.  But ol’ Barmybaby was neither joking nor continuing a line of ‘discussion’. A bad tempered bully? A coward? Or just plain, old fashioned ignorance and arrogance fuelled by ego.  All I suspect.  No matter, he may thank the gods it was the women, not men he spoke to in that gutless manner.  The way of the bully and coward.

Now what sort of man is that?  A supposed ‘leader’ of this nation, one who believes he can, with impunity, offer gross insult to mothers and wives who passionately; and, by the by, quite correctly believe that a certain thing is not what’s best for their land and families.  Who dares to tell our women to “piss off”; and, WTF does it say about an accountant who would, if he could, be king.  Disgraceful, UFB bad form.  Obviously he has no respect for the land, little love of country and is not; not by my measure a gentleman.  Let us see his arm against that of a farrier, his hand against that of a carpenter, his courage against that of a real fighter.  No chance, right.  His soft, little hands could not hold a candle against our country girls, let alone their men.

This country needs to tell Barmybaby and his fellow travellers, in no uncertain terms - to Bugger off and don’t come back. Not until he has learned some respect, manners; and, more importantly, how to duck a punch.  

Second the P7 motion – Piss off - Tosser.

Toot toot.

Third that motion and I think the New England constituents are also catching on that this 'tosser' is not doing them any favours - Dodgy

Megan Kuhn (courtesy of the Northern Daily Leader) eloquently explains how much more BJ could have done to stop Santos plans for CSG on the Liverpool Plains:
Quote:Barnaby ‘squirms’ from his portfolio’s responsibilities
June 10, 2016, 8 p.m.
Megan Kuhn is a mother and grazier from the Liverpool Plains in the New England electorate, and is a member of the North West Alliance. She writes to explain the inherent need to protect the nation’s farmland from resource giants.

DESPITE his rhetoric and blame-shifting, our Deputy Prime Minister, Agriculture and Water Minister and local member for New England, Barnaby Joyce, can act on the coal and coal seam gas developments that threaten our highly productive Liverpool Plains food bowl. 

Instead of doing everything in his power to protect our food-producing areas, Barnaby Joyce squirms from the responsibility that comes with his portfolio. 

Following the news on Monday that Santos has active plans for CSG drilling on the Liverpool Plains, Joyce said the issue is not in his control and passed the buck to his state National Party colleagues. 

As a federal minister, Barnaby Joyce has a powerful platform to raise issues within Cabinet and lead a shift away from the quarry vision of his National Party.

However, the National Party he leads does not seem to have a clear policy on CSG. 

In the last term, Mr Joyce voted to hand back the federal “water trigger” power to the states.

As deputy PM, he pleads he is powerless, but he himself voted to relinquish to the states a significant Commonwealth power to intervene in mining assessments. 

Fortunately this bill was blocked in the Senate, but there could be no clearer failure on Joyce’s behalf to advocate for land and water against mining giants like Santos and Shenhua. 

As a federal minister, Joyce has broad and multiple powers under the constitution. Section 51 gives the Commonwealth powers to intervene in respect to: i) trade and commerce, xx) foreign corporations and, xxix) external affairs.

Each of these powers provides the potential means for the Commonwealth to intervene on environmental matters.

Fraser Island was protected from sand mining when Malcolm Fraser’s government used the trade and commerce power to intervene, despite the fierce opposition of Joh Bjelke-Petersen’s state government.
 
When challenged, the decision was unanimously upheld by the High Court of Australia.
Mr Joyce could use the corporations power to control any domestic or foreign corporation, or the external affairs power against projects that affect matters protected by international environmental treaties. 

Instead of leading the charge to use Commonwealth powers to fight for the protection of agricultural land, on Monday, Barnaby Joyce defended his failures by pointing out that Commonwealth intervention may involve a trip to the High Court.

Well it may, but there is a High Court precedent in favour of intervention on the trade and commerce ground, given that Shenhua coal and Santos CSG are destined for export. 
Commonwealth governments have gone to court to defend the countryside from damaging projects before.

Barnaby Joyce is our deputy PM, our minister for agriculture and water and our local representative.

When he claims powerlessness to protect our prime agricultural land and our precious groundwater resources, we ask “Is minister Joyce effective in his role?”

 Our food security and water resources are too important to leave to buck-passing and empty rhetoric when the resource giants have the nation’s farmland in their sights. 

On June 23 a forum about water and mining will be held at Wests’ Diggers, Tamworth. It will hear from experts, farmers, and the New England candidates who accept the invitation.

Shades of PelAir

To follow on from that, last week the Guardian reported:
Quote:...Tony Windsor has accused Barnaby Joyce of a conflict of interest on water security, claiming the federal National party took more than $80,000 in donations from mining company Santos after the water trigger legislation was introduced.

Windsor claimed since he introduced the water trigger legislation in 2011 to assess the impacts of large mining projects on water quality, a steady stream of donations from Santos to the National party began.

“There’s a very, very strange money trail that has developed in relation to Santos and the National party federally,” Windsor said outside his electoral office in Tamworth.

Windsor said Santos donated to the federal National party once in 2003 and again in 2009. However after the water trigger legislation was introduced in 2011, the company donated 18 times, amounting to $80,360.

According to Windsor, larger donations of $22,000 were given at the time of the 2013 federal election and in August 2014, when the environment minister Greg Hunt’s legislation to throw out the water trigger was before the parliament. Santos said the $22,000 donations were for the Nationals policy conventions held at those times.

Tony Abbott had campaigned during the 2013 election for a so-called “one-stop environmental shop”, which would remove the federal oversight put in place by Windsor and Labor, by devolving the water trigger power to the states.

Windsor said the people of New England were facing compulsory acquisitions and contaminated groundwater from Santos and other coal seam gas companies, and questioned how they could believe Joyce when he is receiving donations from the very company they are fighting.

“This is the very definition of self-interest,” said Windsor.

Joyce did not address the claims directly but lamented Windsor’s campaign strategy.
“It’s a very sad poo-throwing exercise,” he told reporters in Armidale.
 
Santos rejected Windsor’s assertions “categorically”.

“There is nothing strange about Santos contributing in a bipartisan manner to the ALP, Liberal party and the Nationals. Santos supports strong and stable government in Australia,” a company spokesman said.

“At all times, Santos complies with all election funding disclosure requirements and discloses all political spend, whether thresholds are reached or not. Since 2011, it is noteworthy that Santos provided and publicly reported more support for the ALP, than for the Nationals.”

“Santos rejects Mr Windsor’s claims that our explorations activities either, occur on compulsorily acquired property, or have contaminated a water source.”

Windsor said he was not opposed to donations but had never taken donations from the mining or coal seam gas industry. He called on the federal National party to return the donations “given Mr Joyce’s claims now that this is a state issue”.

.“We have this sudden increase in donations to the federal Nationals right around the time the ‘water trigger’ was being considered, ahead of the 2013 election, and before the Senate tried to neuter the ‘water trigger’ under PM Tony Abbott,” he said.”...
Conflict of interest, you bet? Shades of PelAir you bet? - TOKC #97:
Quote:Coming back to the bizarre REX 250K donation to the federal ALP, when REX repeatedly made claims of a deep loathing of the Labor party and it's former miniscule for non-aviation Albanese, I came across another interesting tit-bit some 6 months after the VH-NGA ditching at Norfolk Island. In reference to this link - HERE - of the official opening of the REX affiliated AAPA (Australian Airline Pilot Academy) on the 27 May 2010.

Take note slide one.. [Image: rolleyes.gif]

[Image: 2.jpg]

{ P2 comment: Why does that date ring a bell??}

Next slide, Albo rubbing shoulders with those damn Tories [Image: biggrin.gif] :

[Image: 4.jpg]

Next slide Albo giving the thumbs up.. [Image: shy.gif] :

[Image: 11.jpg]
 
And from the Grand Old Nationals: MONEY TALKS - Err..."division required??" 
[Image: Untitled_Clipping_061615_033800_PM.jpg]


This 'soft' corruption of political parties simply has to stop as it is eroding the rights & privileges of individuals like Karen Casey and the Liverpool Plains farmers. Their rights to access the normal justice and effective governance normally afforded to those citizens who live in a free and open democracy.

Shame on you Barnaby, shame on you Albo, shame! Undecided

 
MTF...P2 Tongue
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#88

Who are the leading donors to federal political parties?
Property developers.
Who has been gifted control of our secondary airports?
You guessed it.
Who have corrupted the meaning and intent of the airport act?
You guessed it.
Who have failed to comply with the terms of the commonwealth leases they were granted?
You guessed it.
Who has completely ignored environment protection laws by claiming they dont apply to the State land they lease from the commonwealth?
Yup you guessed it.
Something rotten in the state of Denmark?
Maybe but it sure as hell pongs in Australia thats for sure.
Anyone guess which recipient on the Queens honours list was intrumental in all of the above?
Aww come on think of pumpkins.
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#89

Barnaby Joyce is a skirt. He is brave enough to take on 'big ticket items' like famous actors and their illegal 4 legged rodents, he is comfortable posing at piss troughs with perfectly groomed ministers while comparing the size of their todgers, and he is man enough to tell some poor country gals to piss off. But is he man enough to take on the real important issues affecting every day Australians? Nup, I doubt it. Just another slick talking political bullshit artist with no real plans, no answers to our countries real issues, no real direction, no real input. Oxygen thief.

Hey Barnaby and Skidmore, you boys think you got ambushed in Tamworth? Well I would've loved to have seen you two muppets fly into Windorah in a fixed wing before Bub retired and tell her to piss off!!
She would've aimed that famous shotgun at thou both, given you a knuckle sandwich and then pissed in your aircrafts fuel tank.....and then she would've gotten angry!
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#90

Democracy of the future??

Slight change of tack but relevant to the current bollocks election campaign, that seems to be dragging on forever... Sleepy

Shane Dowling, of Kangaroo Court fame, has actually written a semi-promo blog-piece, combined with a YouTube video, on behalf of a new tech-head political party, which may actually get some support from those citizens, businesses & industries (like the aviation industry) feeling disenfranchised by the major parties: A new age of democracy in Australia – The Flux Party that allows you to vote on all legislation.
 


 &..courtesy ZDNET:
Quote:Blockchain startup makes Australian Senate play with democracy-as-a-service

The Flux Startup is making its Australian political debut, armed with 13 Senate candidates and a blockchain-based smartphone voting app that promises to transform democracy.
[Image: asha-barbaschow-140-105.jpg]
By Asha Barbaschow | June 16, 2016 -- 01:38 GMT (11:38 AEST) | Topic: Start-Ups

With just over two weeks until the Australian federal election, The Flux Party is campaigning nationwide in a bid to see its 13 Senate candidates elected into the Upper House with its blockchain-based democratisation platform in tow.

The Flux Party was launched six months ago by the Flux Startup, and co-founder and lead architect Max Kaye said the party's intention is to transform democracy as Australia knows it.

"Our only policy is parliamentary reform essentially," Kaye told ZDNet. "We think that the system is no longer suitable for a society of our complexity and advanced state, so we essentially promote the Flux system as a superior alternative.

"We're the first company that tries to provide democracy-as-a-service."

If a Flux Party candidate or two is elected, they will bring with them the Flux Voting Platform, a blockchain-based smartphone app that would allow the Senator to share information with the electorate. Once the details of a Bill, for example, are shared with members or followers and they have had their opportunity to voice their opinion, the Flux Party representative will cast their vote based on citizen response.

The Senator essentially becomes a pure proxy in the process.

"The Flux Voting Platform is basically a way to let everyday Australians participate in politics to the best of their ability. One of the things we recognise as a flaw of the old way of doing democracy was that it sort of presumes that everyone is equally suited to have a say on every issue," Kaye said.

"Being in a society full of knowledge and specialisation, we thought that it was a bit of an outdated idea now and it would be more useful for people to have a say in areas where they know a lot as opposed to having an equal say on every issue."

The six-month-old party hopes to have its concept introduced at local, state, federal, and even international levels, with Kaye stating the startup's long-term aim is to transform democracy and restore political power back to the people.

"In our view, if you were to establish a colony on Mars, Flux would be the ideal system to deliver a democratic system of government to these early settlers," Kaye said.
"Our mandate is to win power and then give it away."

Kaye said his party does not have the trust that others do, and therefore cannot expect people to trust that the Flux Party will do the right thing. He said using blockchain technology gives the public a method that removes the need for Senator trust.

"We're removing as much trust as possible," he said. "Having a blockchain means that we keep ourselves accountable as well. [The party has] tried to put ourselves in the position of least authority. We don't want to be in a position where we could flip votes.

"One of the main problems with traditional web architecture is that it is all based on a central server and you've got to trust whatever you get back from that. By making public commitments to the blockchain, people can then use that to verify that the voting record is true and complete and hasn't been tampered with in any way by us."

With the election on July 2, Kaye said the focus of the Flux Party will be in building out the platform properly.

"We developed a minimum viable product last year and found that to be reasonably straightforward in the scheme of things. I built that over a month on nights and weekends and it wasn't overly complex -- the voting system is actually quite straightforward from a technical point of view," he said.

The Flux Startup recently privately raised AU$270,000 in seed funding. The company said further investment will be provided via a trust which will be seeded using electoral funding provided by the Australian Electoral Commission.

"If we receive any funding from the electoral commission -- because it ultimately comes back to taxpayer dollars -- we'll treat this as though it was the people of Australia who gave us that money and so the idea behind that is to try and create a trust in the name of the Australian people and use that as a way to both fund the platform but also enfranchise regular voters," Kaye said.
Interesting concept and perhaps, from the aviation industry's point of view, combined with the Sunfish Protocol we may actually have a way forward to get an effective legislative solution to the current impasse to aviation safety regulator & regulatory reform being enforced by unelected bureaucrats... Angry


Just saying... Wink


MTF..P2  Tongue
Reply
#91

Dear Malcolm & Bill? - Yours the forgotten industry  Undecided

This week from around the Alphabet traps... Rolleyes

Correspondence from Ben Morgan

Quote:...This position was highlighted by the inability of Mr Joyce or Mr Chester to provide any meaningful position or perspectives to the attendees of the aviation rally.  They both simply resigned themselves to public statements of having no idea about aviation and deferred the industry to deal with bureaucrats, whom have no motivation to see broad change occur.

Our industry is governed by a department and a regulator which are vastly disconnected to the realities and the challenges that face the hard working men and women in aviation across this country.  They have made entering and setting up aviation businesses cost prohibitive and have devalued investment within our industry, guiding the general aviation industry into serious and perilous decline...


&..
(06-23-2016, 11:09 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  Aerial App Phil speaks up about the stalled Forsyth (ASRR) recommendations & CASA reform... Wink

First from ProAviation... Wink
Quote:[Image: cropped-Aircraft3.jpg]
CASA change too little and too slow

And from Oz Flying:
Quote:[Image: Ag_wagon_6E7380A0-3819-11E6-8D26563246365964.jpg]The Aerial Application Association of Australia speaks for Australia's many crop sprayers and firebombers. (Steve Hitchen)

AAAA calls for More Action from Canberra
22 June 2016

...The AAAA has increased the pressure that has been placed on both CASA and the department in the lead-up to the 2 July Federal Election, with The Australian Aviation Associations Forum releasing their 2016 policy and AOPA producing the Project Eureka papers.

With the government in caretaker mode, official responses to these proposals and the Tamworth industry rally have not been made, although sources inside the department suggest something will be released this week...

Finally off the Yaffa today via Avbiz... Wink

Quote:[Image: Parliament_BUILDING_8AF32AB0-27D8-11E6-A...17F827.jpg]

General Aviation calls on political parties for change
23 Jun 2016

With a federal election little more than a week away, Australian general aviation organisations are challenging both sides of Parliament to commit to major regulatory change.

Ben Morgan organised the May 6 Tamworth rally at which members of the general aviation community aired their dissatisfaction with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority directly to Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Darren Chester. In an open letter he has called on both sides of Parliament to commit to change at the regulator, should they be in government after July 2.

“As an Australian and as an aviation business owner I have become disillusioned (as have thousands of others in our industry) by the quagmire of unnecessary bureaucracy and regulation that is suffocating our general aviation industry - sending it bankrupt,” he said.

“Our industry is governed by a department and a regulator which are vastly disconnected to the realities and the challenges that face the hard working men and women in aviation across this country. They have made entering and setting up aviation businesses cost prohibitive and have devalued investment within our industry, guiding the general aviation industry into serious and perilous decline.”

This week the Aerial Application Association of Australia (AAAA) also released a plea to any incoming government to understand and fix the concerns of the industry, saying change at CASA is “too little and too slow”.

“Two years after the damning Forsyth Report, we do not appear to be materially closer to large scale and tangible relief from the problems identified’, said Phil Hurst, CEO of AAAA.
“Despite enormous goodwill and support from industry over that time, the lack of CASA output across a wide range of issues is deeply troubling and will continue to handicap Australia’s ability to take advantage of the predicted significant international upturn in aviation demand. Of particular concern is the apparent rejection of a partnership approach identified by Forsyth as key to improving safety.”

Neither major political party has announced a position on aviation as part of their election campaigns.

On June 7 CASA released a timetable for completion of its aviation regulatory reform program, covering 20 regulatory change projects to be completed over the next three years. These include general operating rules, air transport operations, aerial work, continuing airworthiness and maintenance for small aircraft, small aircraft maintenance licensing, sport and recreational operations and unmanned aircraft.
MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#92

(06-23-2016, 01:32 PM)Peetwo Wrote:  Dear Malcolm & Bill? - Yours the forgotten industry  Undecided

This week from around the Alphabet traps... Rolleyes

Correspondence from Ben Morgan


&..
(06-23-2016, 11:09 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  Aerial App Phil speaks up about the stalled Forsyth (ASRR) recommendations & CASA reform... Wink

Update from off the UP:  Chester et.al where's your aviation policy??  

Quote:Dick Smith:

Still no GA aviation policy for the election?



Am I correct in stating that the major parties have not come up with any aviation policy for GA for this federal election?

If so it seems mighty strange.

Does anyone have an explanation? What is Mr Chester doing?




Plazbot - Because its not actually as important as you think?




Lead Balloon (aka Creampuff) -

Everyone knows their policy, Dick: Abdicate all responsibility.


Simple! [Image: thumbs.gif]




Dick Smith - Plazbot. I have never thought GA is important to our politicians . Please check with me before you post erroneous information.


In the past even though it's clear they don't care about GA they have normally come up with some policy. Why different this time? Is it to put our more dynamic AOPA in its place ?




Flying Binghi - If they couldn't be bothered with GA then why waste your vote. It is time to vote in some new blood. There's some new options now...


The Australian Liberty Alliance has a fairly large list of candidates:


ALA final candidate list for 2016

* Kirralie Smith - Senate New South Wales
* Garry 'Angry' Anderson - Senate New South Wales
* Bernard Gaynor - Senate Queensland
* Alan Biggs - Senate Queensland
* Chelle Dobson - Senate Queensland
* Wanda Marsh - Senate South Australia
* Tony Robinson - Senate Tasmania
* Daniel Jones - Senate Victoria
* Debbie Robinson - Senate Western Australia
* Marion Hercock - Senate Western Australia
* Ron Pike - Seat of Farrer NSW
* Peter Kelly - Seat of Bradfied NSW
* Stephen Roddick - Seat of Lindsay NSW
* Carl Halley - Seat of Macquarie NSW
* Shaun Spain - Seat of Forde QLD
* Matt Darragh - Seat of Griffith QLD
* Caleb Wells - Seat of Longman QLD
* Rob Windred - Seat of Hinkler QLD
* Tony Duncan - Seat of Bowman QLD
* John Spellman - Seat of Fisher QLD
* David Archibald - Seat of Curtin WA

This is an impressive front row for our party which only launched on 20 October 2015. We achieved this with grassroots support from Australians around the country like yourself. There is no big business, no big union and no petro dollars behind us. We are a grassroots movement in the true sense of the word and every member has good reason to be proud - and this is only the start.


Final candidate list for 2016 | Australian Liberty Alliance

MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#93

Did a bit of a UP crawl this morning, mostly irrelevant boring stuff, but this caught my eye,

Dick asks a question.


Quote:More Aussie companies sold- more wealth shipped off overseas

________________________________________
Australian owned Aeromil has recently been sold to foreign owned Hawker Pacific.

AMSA has just given a $640 million contract to foreign owned Cobham.

This means all their profits and wealth creation will be drained from Australia and will head off overseas.

A few decades ago most of the Search and Rescue money would end up in the hands of local Aussie owned GA businesses. Remember PADS?

Why can't we own and operate successful aviation businesses that can win these contracts? Are we that mediocre ?

By the way- who owns Hawker Pacific? Where does the money go?

Well maybe the same question could be asked, where do the billions in turnover from our Airports go? Well we do know in Sydney's case, to a company that resides in the Bahamas.One could ask was privatisation of our airports fiscally responsible? 14 years and 14 billion dollars and 85 years or another 85 billion of turnover until the people of Australia has a chance of getting it back. Now just who was it in the civil service who set that up?? Think of beakers and pumpkins.

That man again, our shining mate nails it with:

Quote:Dick, the reason we can't own and operate successful aviation businesses in Australia is exactly the same as why every other successful Australian business is sold overseas; the economic mandarins of Canberra have built their careers on the theory that no successful businesses can be operated from Australia, and they do anything and everything to prove that their theory is correct.


In their minds the only businesses Australia is "allowed" by economic theory to be internationally competitive are mining and agriculture, anything else is regarded as an aberration that is clearly the result of market distortion by Government action. Therefore any successful Australian non mining, non agriculture business must be suppressed to make their theory work.

The entire taxation and regulatory system is designed to prevent successful development and operation of Australian owned businesses at an internationally competitive level.

Examples: - Fringe benefit taxes make it difficult for Australian businesses to engage with international customers here or overseas. this kills export opportunities.

- taxation treatment of overseas profits.

- taxation treatment of capital investments Eg. depreciation.

-taxation treatment of overseas expenses, travel, etc.

- a rotten system of "Australian standards" and Australian licensing and regulation that does not harmonise with anything on the planet.

Aviation regulation is just a microcosm of the whole economy - we are not ALLOWED to be competitive.

The net result? The only viable business strategy for Australian entrepreneurs is to build a business here and prove your model is locally successful, then sell it to an international player.

if you try and run something here that is remotely internationally successful looking, Canberra will do its best to shut you down, the car industry is a case in point.

I fought this battle for two years in the Geoff Kennett Victorian government and came up against these bastards in Canberra time and again/

Now completely inspired, I had to jump in with my feeble reflections. Damn that man is good.... not me you fools the inscrutable Sunny!!

Quote:Dick,

Sunny is so right. Just look at all the tax free dollars that disappear to off shore tax havens each year from our airports alone.

It boggles my mind that our political elite are so ignorant and so hypocritical.
Australia is by far the most over governed country in the world, and it is costing us dearly.

The aviation industry is governed by bureaucrats who govern for their own self interests, not for the interests of those they govern and our politicians completely ignore this fact.

The hypocrisy of it all!!

Politicians, of all persuasions, make statements of their intention to be fiscally responsible on one hand, then completely complicit or blind to their bureaucrats squandering hundreds of millions of dollars on a regulatory folly that unequivocally, undeniably is destroying a whole industry, completely devoid of any quantifiable improvement in what allegedly the regulatory reforms are intended to do, enhance safety.

Almost half a BILLION dollars and thirty years so far to half finish them. How much and how long to complete them?
There will be no industry left long before the regulations are finished, each new suite adding massive cost of compliance.

There is simply no point in continuing with this folly, if the politicians are true to their statements of fiscal probity and are loth to accept the obvious and demand real reform, they should put the industry out of its misery and shut it down completely before CAsA completes the process by a thousand paper cuts of regulatory incompetence and hundreds of millions of wasted dollars.

The solution is so frustratingly simple and cost effective. Ken Cannane and AMROBA showed us the solution, even including a timeline. A few million dollars and a year or so, and our industry unshackled from the burden of overregulation could begin to imagine a future with all the benefits that would bestow on our country. Below an example from an article in Aviation Week illustrates of what could be.

The PM and the opposition make mother goose statements of supporting jobs, encouraging innovation and enterprise on one hand, then completely ignore the efforts of their bureaucrats to smother them.

It is inconceivable to me that AVM Skidmore can, with a straight face, say the industry is in good shape.

To me he is either very naive, if he does actually believe that. A complete incompetent, if he accepts the overwhelming evidence is true and has no vision to fix it, or an arrant coward, if he's not prepared to face down his mis-management team and institute real reform.

We should be asking our politicians why it is that comparable countries to Australia have vibrant aviation Industries?

Countries like Ireland, New Zealand, Canada or Brazil.

Is it because they have a greater need for aviation services?
Some maybe, but Ireland and New Zealand hardly are of a size that would support that theory.

Is it because their citizens are more entrepreneurial?
I don’t believe that is true.

Is it because their citizens are more innovative?
I don’t believe that is true either.

The one glaring difference I see is their regulations support their industries whilst ours suppresses it.

From an Aviation Week article.


Quote:"The Irish government and the Irish civil aviation authority (IAA) have adopted a more forward-thinking orientation on aviation than most of their, often much larger, counterparts in Europe.

The policy is paying off — big time. Ireland is one of the smallest countries in Europe, with just 4.6 million inhabitants, yet about half of the world’s leased aircraft are registered in the country and the world’s first duty-free shop was established here. It is also home to Europe’s largest airline by passenger count and the world’s largest airline in terms of international enplanements: Ryanair.

Aviation executives in Ireland commonly joke that it took an Irishman to get International Airlines Group (IAG) off the ground and grow it into an agile, profitable and diversified airline group: IAG CEO Willie Walsh, born in Dublin and a former Aer Lingus CEO.
Aviation is central and strategic to the Irish economy, IAA CEO Eamonn Brennan noted.

“We live on an island; we don’t even have bridges. This is a key thing.” Aviation contributes just over €4 billion ($4.3 billion) directly to the Irish GDP, comprising €1.9 billion from aviation, €1.3 billion through the supply chain and €0.9 billion from associated spending by people employed in aviation.

It supports 26,000 jobs directly and a further 16,000 in the supply chain. Ireland’s tourism industry, which is dependent on aviation, accounts for another €5.3-billion GDP contribution and 180,000 jobs.

The Irish government has earmarked aviation—along with information technology and the pharmaceutical industry—as high-value sectors to the Irish economy. It launched a new aviation policy in 2015, after two years of consultation. “This government policy says that we have to make the industry more competitive and innovative.

The global aviation industry continues to expand and is estimated to double over the next 20 years. This presents opportunities for Ireland in virtually every area of aviation such as airlines, pilot training services, satellite-based air traffic control services and aircraft leasing services,” Brennan said.

Aer Lingus CEO Stephen Kavanagh told the Executive Report that Ireland’s embracing of deregulation and liberalizing access had paid off.

“It’s a very small economy in the global context, but it’s a very open economy, one of the most open economies and on a par with Singapore,” he said.

“Ireland has recognized the requirement for connectivity and, as an island, sees that air transportation is how that’s delivered. We have very strong indigenous competition with Ryanair, but there’s the ability for us to compete not only in the Irish market but also across the Atlantic and in Europe. Deregulation has allowed us to grow scale.

Deregulation, competition and liberalization have brought out the very best in terms of behaviors and competitive response. We’re efficient, we’re focused on returns, and the Irish economy has benefited and the consumer has benefited.”

Kavanagh also believes competition reaps its own rewards. “Competitiveness has fostered demand,” he said. “We see a higher propensity to travel than in most other nations and that’s because we’ve created an opportunity for competitive airfares.

“We are one of the two largest Irish airlines, but there are others and the aviation eco-system, including airlines, lessors, MROs and travel technologists, has prospered because it’s been open to competition. To remain relevant, we have to remain competitive and everyone has reaped the benefits.”

IATA DG & CEO Tony Tyler told the Executive Report, “the Irish government has taken a very pro-aviation strategy for some years now,” pointing out that the country reduced its departure tax to zero in 2014. With the growth and planned second runway at Dublin Airport, there are “clearly signs that the tax policy is bearing fruit and near neighbours should take note,” Tyler said.

Yeah I know, feeble, there's only one Sunny!
Reply
#94

But, but - everything is Rosy – ain’t it?


Quote:From Dick Smith.

The Barnaby Joyce/ Tony Windsor seat may be very close. Say less than a hundred votes difference.

I understand Tony Windsor has made an unequivocal statement that he will support Mr Xenophon in getting the ADSB mandate delayed until 2021 as per the AOPA requirement .

So far Mr Joyce and the Minister are supporting AsA/ CASA - and therefore the further destruction of GA in this country because even CASA claims that if complied with the mandate will cost GA over $30 million.

No existing safety problem is being addressed . It's shear bastardry

Now Dick is banging on, as are many, many others about aviation ‘policy’ and the lack thereof from the major parties campaigning for election.  But he’s wrong, you all are. The major players are already showing a willingness to conform with the new ‘lean, clean, no red tape and bullshit policy and by doing their part to reduce the sheer volume of paper which normally flows like an avalanche from our capitol city.  It’s clear that the uneducated, unwashed, unshriven IOS just don’t pay attention. Each major party has, quite clearly, without wasting time with words on paper stated ‘their’ policy. Herewith, for your education, enlightenment and amusement party policy statements.

Alby-Back – Labour – Duck ‘em, we’ll piss ‘em all off , every last solitary one.

Barmybaby – Lib/Nat – Flush ‘em, we’ll back the CASA all the way.

Greens – We’ll stop the chemtrails.

You can clearly see that the economy of words saves the country a fortune; which of course puts the independents in a bad light; I mean that Xenophon bloke, he  just wants to make trouble, questioning everything and wanting to see an industry doing well; and, then there’s that Windsor fellah, how dare he actually care a bugger about water quality and helping aviation in his area.  You can clearly see with whom the future of aviation resides.  Just think, in about six months time, Dazzling, Dancing Darren, doyen of MKR may even learn to spell aircraft and with help, come to the realisation that they have to do with the aviation industry.

There now, see what you have to look forward to; ain’t it grand, ain’t great etc.

Reply
#95

(06-26-2016, 06:51 AM)kharon Wrote:  But, but - everything is Rosy – ain’t it?



Alby-Back – Labour – Duck ‘em, we’ll piss ‘em all off , every last solitary one.

Barmybaby – Lib/Nat – Flush ‘em, we’ll back the CASA all the way.

Greens – We’ll stop the chemtrails.

You can clearly see that the economy of words saves the country a fortune; which of course puts the independents in a bad light; I mean that Xenophon bloke, he  just wants to make trouble, questioning everything and wanting to see an industry doing well; and, then there’s that Windsor fellah, how dare he actually care a bugger about water quality and helping aviation in his area.  You can clearly see with whom the future of aviation resides.  Just think, in about six months time, Dazzling, Dancing Darren, doyen of MKR may even learn to spell aircraft and with help, come to the realisation that they have to do with the aviation industry.

There now, see what you have to look forward to; ain’t it grand, ain’t great etc.

Once we were a 'Lucky Country' - Now? Confused

Well said "K" and apparently it is not just our little patch that is being constantly embuggered by bureaucratic red tape. Off the UP there is a similar discussion happening where Old Akro points out why it is industries & businesses, such as in aviation, are struggling to survive and grow in this country: 
Quote:
Quote:Just look at all the tax free dollars that disappear to off shore tax havens each year from our airports alone.
 
This makes me so annoyed. Low tax "Havens" include Singapore (17%) and the UK (20%)

Closer to home, the countries that we compete with for Asia / Pacific head offices, all have lower company tax rates than Australia.

The problem is not that companies are choosing to base them selves at "Tax Havens" They are choosing to avoid one of the highest corporate tax countries in the world.

Australia is a very difficult country to do business. Our tax rates are high. Our Industry support is low. Our freight costs are among the highest in the world. It costs more to get a container from the port of Brisbane to Coopers Plains than from the Thai port of Laemchabang to the Port of Brisbane.

Our fair work legislation is a nightmare with awards that typically run from 90 - 400 pages. Its nearly impossible now to employ someone without breaching one of our (frequently conflicting) labour laws.

Our Telecom costs are outrageously high. In Thailand mobile calls & data are about 1/10th that of Australia - and Thailand has better speed.

In other countries - including the UK, you can get access to politicians and senior public servants. In Australia the bureaucrats that can make decisions that can destroy your business are faceless.

Australia is doing everything it can to tell companies that they are not welcome here.

Where would you rather set up? A country that has a tax rate 10 percentage points above neighboring countries, that has high real estate costs, poor telecom support, expensive & poor airport infrastructure and will jail directors who contravene our byzantine workplace laws - or Singapore, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur or Hong Kong?

However it is not all doom & gloom. According to TAAAF with some considered reforms and strong resolve from the Government to adopt their policy, within a stringent timeframe, industry will grow and contribute much, much more to the economy:
Quote: 

PART 1 Introduction
 
1. A New Environment of Partnership

Australia’s aviation industry is a major contributor to the nation’s economy and it faces significant challenges. Australia should have a highly efficient and effective aviation industry supported by government policy and regulation. Unfortunately, the reality is different.

Aviation policy has languished and is in need of a bold agenda for reform. The Forum believes that this document can make an important contribution to the development of that agenda. It is critical that the industry start moving forward again rather than being subjected to another review.

The Forum believes that our political representatives can capitalise on our natural advantages and the skills of our people by having government work with the industry in a new partnership to establish an aviation environment that supports safety, encourages competition and innovation and delivers significant benefits to the Australian community.
The Forum believes that key challenges for aviation in the next term of our Federal Parliament are to create a whole-of-government approach and forward-looking aviation policy, to harmonise aviation regulations with international standards and to establish performance-based safety regulation based on risk assessment and outcomes.
This 2016 Australian Aviation Associations Forum Aviation Policy offers a practical strategy to continue the task of reforming Australia’s aviation landscape...

&..

Quote:PART 2 The Australian Aviation Challenge


1. The Aviation Contribution To The Australian Economy

The aviation sector is a significant contributor to the Australian economy contributing in excess of $30 billion per annum (2% of annual GDP) and employing in excess of 250,000 people (directly by airlines, airports and indirectly by the industry value chain).

By 2030 Australia’s population is set to increase to 30 million people (up by 6 million people on today) and as a consequence the size of our major and regional centers will continue to grow, particularly within corridor areas between the major capital cities.

This will create further significant demand for air travel and put pressure on infrastructure. Additionally, as the migrant population increases and general wealth and accessibility to air travel improves, particularly in China and India, ever-increasing numbers of international visits will occur.

While domestic aviation activity has been relatively flat over the last few years, international traffic into the major capital cities of Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane has been growing at a rate of more than 5% per annum.

Non-passenger carrying operations provide community and business services including freight, ambulance and rescue, agricultural, firefighting and survey operations that make a significant - sometimes critical - economic contribution. In addition, sectors including aviation manufacturing, training, maintenance and overhaul demand urgent action to remove impediments to growth.

The Forum believes that Government implementation of Forum policies will provide a significant stimulus to the aviation economy, create jobs across the nation and empower industry to take advantage of significant projected growth.
 

2. Global Growth

Globally, aviation is forecast to continue to grow at over 4% each year for the next 20 years with passenger numbers more than doubling to reach 7.3 billion by 2034.

Deliveries of new commercial aircraft over this period are anticipated to be over 38,000 which, together with replacement of older aircraft, will double the present global fleet to 43,500 aircraft. The Asia Pacific is now the world’s largest aviation market and over 40% of these deliveries are to airlines that operate in this region. (Reference: Boeing Current Market Outlook 2015-2034).

The demand for air travel will continue to put pressure on our aviation system that at times is already capacity-constrained.

Substantial investment will be required to ensure sufficient capacity is available to meet this demand. This additional capacity will be in airport and air traffic infrastructure ($16 billion already forecast by airports), the training of thousands of aircrew, air traffic controllers, airport staff and the expansion of businesses that service this industry.


3. Twin Aviation Challenges For Australia

Essentially, Australia has two aviation challenges.

First is the need to ensure the foundations are sound: that our regulatory and policy environment is conducive to growth and there is sufficient capacity in terms of trained people and modern infrastructure to meet forecast demand and thereby maximise the efficiency of our aviation system.

Secondly, our country has the opportunity to build on our expertise to provide a range of services to the burgeoning aviation sector in the Asia Pacific. Australia should be an important regional leader in key aspects of aviation such as flight training, maintenance, air traffic management, security and regulatory controls, technology, avionics and manufacturing of small to medium aircraft and components.

In order to position the country for this future Australia needs to address these challenges, plan for the future and fix long-running issues in our regulatory and government structures that are holding us back...
  
The TAAAF policy is truly a well researched blueprint for industry survival and future positive growth. However the question still hangs on whether the next government has enough insight & testicular fortitude to stare down the bureaucracy and adopt all the essential TAAAF recommendations??? Undecided


MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
#96

Only one aviation policy needed.

Quote:P2 - The TAAAF policy is truly a well researched blueprint for industry survival and future positive growth.  IMO it is

The TAAAF policy is, IMO the ONLY possible way for any government to retrieve the aviation industry.  The new minister will be spoon fed the latest CASA guff about how well the industry is doing and how happy we all are.  It is probably ‘safer’ for the minister to believe those fairy tales; so, lets assume he does.  Then the next case industry should present is how much better we could all be doing without the ridiculous impediments enforced by the ‘authority’.

Lets suppose the ‘Authority’ is put firmly back into it’s rightful place as an ‘Administrator’; for indeed that is it’s true role; then, if we can imagine that the artificial barriers and imposts are removed, we could see a great little outfit like ‘Brumby’ progress from a modest 50 aircraft sold a year to perhaps 150; a percentage exported and the current employee level raised from a humble 12 or so, to perhaps 24 or even 30.  Maybe the regional carriers and charter operators could afford to increase and modernise.  

This cannot happen when it literally costs over $100,000 to place a new aircraft type on an existing AOC and can take well over a 12 month.  

The TAAAF are very much aware of this; their excellent policy provides a clear, bullet-proof pathway for government to follow.  A pathway mapped out, free of charge, by industry experts working from real facts and accurate, coal face data.  If and it’s a big IF the Rev Forsyth’s recommendations and the AMROBA time frame could be harnessed at the same time; the minister responsible for that would go down in legend.

Lets assume CASA is correct and industry is doing well; think how much better it could do unencumbered. Increased employment, increased export, increased revenue, increased profit all of which put bread on the government table and help the nation.  So much better than bumping along the bottom in an endless cycle of more expense to provide more rules, to provide more exemption to flawed rules and fund another decade of ‘regulatory reform’ from a diminishing pool of revenue generated.

Quote:P2 – “However the question still hangs on whether the next government has enough insight & testicular fortitude to stare down the bureaucracy and adopt all the essential TAAAF recommendations???

Spot on mate; bang on the money.  I’ll say it again; the aviation industry can deal; with the rule set, what it cannot do, not for very much longer, is continue to underwrite the lunacy, restrictions and impediments produced by the administrator.  Reform the regulator, the rest flows from there.  However, I repeat myself.

There is one more thing TAAAF could do to which I believe to be essential.  They must ensure that ALL the alphabet groups speak as one, together.  No separate cosy chats and individual agreements. The oldest game play is the tried and true “well, minister, they can’t seem to agree among themselves, so in the absence of agreement, we’ll act as we see best; we are, after all ‘the’ authority".  There you go, right there, game, set and match to the denizens of Sleepy Hollow.  All together – or not at all.  Get behind TAAAF and stick together, you never know, we may even win one round this decade.  Enough?….

Right then, back to my knitting.

Toot toot.
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#97

Jobs & growth or bureaucratic embuggerance??

Good post "K" and nails down the outstanding issues very nicely... Wink

I notice your reference to Brumby is slightly exaggerated as I believe they have built & sold a total of 50 aircraft since they moved to Cowra Airport. Although I'm sure the Brumby CEO Phil Goard would love to see his business grow to where they were producing that many aircraft in a year.

The following is a short video on the success story that is Brumby Aircraft Australia, note the reason why Mr Goard and his family left Sydney Bankstown airport after 30 years:


While on Brumby & Cowra I noticed the following article from Oz Aviation where the Cowra Shire Council is embarked on an enterprising attempt to attract more aviation businesses and aircraft owners to Cowra:
Quote:Cowra offers 21 lots as part of new aviation development at airport
June 27, 2016 by australianaviation.com.au
[Image: CowraAirport1.jpg]
Cowra is hoping to attract new aviation businesses to the Central West NSW with 21 freehold lots available at its local airport.

The local council has opened a tender process for 21 commercially zoned lots in a new aviation development at Cowra Airport, which features a 1,630m bitumen spray-sealed runway, upgraded landing rights and aircraft parking including a hard stand for heavy aircraft.

Cowra Mayor Bill West said the airport had huge potential to generate economic benefits for the town such as bringing new jobs to the area.

“This is your open invitation to one of the most beautiful parts of NSW with unlimited opportunity in unrestricted airspace; all land will be fully-serviced with water, power, sewer, and NBN fibre-to- the-premises with no landing fees (under seven tonnes maximum take-off weight),” Cr West said.

[Image: Cowra_BillWest-300x168.jpg]
Cowra Shire Council Mayor Bill West. (Cowra Shire Council)

“This development is designed to help create new aviation-related and employment-creating industries in our town.

“Air industries and operators are technology-savvy, high-value, clients who bring a range of complementary economic benefits to areas where they are encouraged to operate.”
Currently, Cowra Airport has pilot training, air charter, commercial and rural fire-fighting services, as well as recreational flights. Businesses already at the airport include light sport and general aviation aircraft manufacturer Brumby Aircraft Australia, which has Aviation Industry Corporation of China as a partner.

The tender closes July 29. More details can be found on the Cowra Airport website.
Going back to the TAAAF report, airports & aircraft manufacturing fall under recommendations 14 & 17 respectively:
Quote: 

14. Airports

Airports are critical support infrastructure and a vibrant airport sector can make a significant contribution to the overall health of the aviation industry.

The Forum recommends, as an integral part of the development of a national aviation strategy, a national airport strategy that seeks to maximise the compatibility of developments with aviation outcomes, including a process that ensures State/Territory planning authorities are also bound by such a policy...


17. Aviation manufacturing

Job creation is a significant element in the potential of the aviation industry to grow.

As part of the development of a national aviation strategy for Australia, manufacturing opportunities and barriers to growth should be identified and effective policies developed.

This strategy should also address the development of Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreements that include the harmonisation and cross-recognition of Australian regulations with a range of other countries so as to facilitate the export of Australian aviation products and parts.

CASA charges for product certification should be abolished and CASA should be required to delegate more responsibilities to industry where there are suitably qualified candidates or organisations.

CASA should also be required to work more closely with all Australian aviation manufacturing companies to develop a more internationally competitive certification process.
Now imagine if you will how much better off industry stakeholders, like the Cowra Shire Council with its airport development project and Brumby Aircraft, were proactively supported by governments and their related agencies, who knows maybe Brumby Aircraft would be producing 50 or more aircraft a year... Huh  

However the reality is businesses and aviation related enterprise live with the threat of possible embuggerance by government agencies like CASA. Take a look at the ongoing CASA embuggerance of Jabiru; or the Bankstown airport tenants situation as classic examples... Dodgy

Is it any wonder many successful aviation related enterprises are taking their businesses off shore?? Confused


MTF...P2 Tongue
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#98

Oops;

Cheers P2 – it is indeed 50 aircraft, total; even so, it’s not too shabby an effort despite the headaches.  I wrote it badly, what I was trying to emphasise was the fact that there was a percentage of those sold overseas, the video mentions 10 to the USA – home of aircraft manufacture.  When you start to look about, Airvan and Jabiru do the same in a modest way; now that is export dollars, jobs and ancillary business for suppliers of materials and equipment.  All good solid, stuff; not in the class of iron ore I know, but none the less productive and progressive.  

These enterprises need support and pro active assistance; the Cowra council (bless ‘em) are trying to help Brumby whenever and wherever they can and if they can persuade some additional tenants onto the field – well, it may not be earth shattering, but at least there will be one place left where the roots of  ‘aviation’ can thrive.

As you know, we have been keeping up with the Jabiru saga. The shame for CASA in their botched management of the engine troubles and their treatment of a company trying to develop into an export earner is a ministerial and national disgrace. I dare say there will be more to follow on that sorry tale.  Meanwhile, just think of how much better it would be, all around, if the ATSB and CASA had weighed in to help solve the problems, rather than pick up the big ‘R’ stick and try to beat the company into oblivion.  The minister should, but won’t, take a long hard look at this story.  Any government wants productivity, innovation, employment and export; they need the revenue.  Yet successive governments have sat on their hands and allowed a potential revenue earner to be restrained, restricted and over regulated to the point where looking forward one year is well nigh impossible, let alone developing a five or ten year plan in which investors may, with some confidence, may take an interest.  It’s bollocks and not Australian.

The tragedy is, for mine, that the solutions have always been offered by the industry itself only to be dismissed by an incompetent, hidebound, counterproductive administrator, masquerading as some kind of ‘authority’ on all things aeronautical. Lets face it, if anyone in CASA could design, finance, build and market and aircraft; fix it or operate a fleet of the same, they would not be skulking in the expensive, air conditioned comforts of Sleepy Hollow; they’d be out here, doing it.

There is only one impediment to the aviation industries progress; remove that and things will get better, in short order.      

Aye well, this poor old keyboard has just taken another beating, bit like the industry; you have to wonder how much longer either can stand the hammering.  I can, for a modest sum and a little inconvenience easily replace this key board.  Re-establishing the roots of an industry is not so simple.

Toot- toot.
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#99

The first 100 days? - Rolleyes

(06-25-2016, 09:58 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  
(06-23-2016, 11:09 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  Aerial App Phil speaks up about the stalled Forsyth (ASRR) recommendations & CASA reform... Wink

Quote:CASA change too little and too slow

Update 25/06/16 - Courtesy Oz Aviation... Wink

Quote:AAAA says improving relationship between industry and regulator a “massive task” for incoming government
June 24, 2016 by australianaviation.com.au 
[Image: IMG_0770.jpg]

The industry group representing Australia’s agriculture and firefighting pilots says the party that wins the upcoming federal election has a “massive task” ahead in building an improved relationship between the industry and the regulator.

Aerial Application Association of Australia (AAAA) chief executive Phil Hurst says his organisation stood ready to give the new government its full backing in carrying out the proposed reforms contained in the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review (ASRR), particularly in relation to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority. (CASA).

“The new Minister and the existing CASA Board will certainly have the full support of the industry in tackling the highly resistant CASA culture of ‘we know better than industry’,” Hirst said in a statement.

“Whoever the new Minister is after the election, they will have a massive task still ahead of them which may require further personnel changes if reform cannot be delivered rapidly – something supported by an industry focussed on outcomes not talk.”

CASA chief executive and director of aviation safety Mark Skidmore has embarked on an organisational overhaul in an effort to “better align CASA’s activities with our responsibilities to the aviation community”.

Recently, the aviation safety regulator has published a new timetable for changes to the nation’s aviation regulations in response to feedback from industry.

And on Friday, CASA apologised to pilots and air traffic controllers who have faced delays in obtaining an aviation medical certificate.

CASA said it had put on more staff to address the delays in processing medical certificates.

“Changes are also being made to workflow practices to improve the processing times,” CASA said in a statement.

Also a quote from Dick Smith off the UP:
Quote:The Barnaby Joyce/ Tony Windsor seat may be very close. Say less than a hundred votes difference.

I understand Tony Windsor has made an unequivocal statement that he will support Mr Xenophon in getting the ADSB mandate delayed until 2021 as per the AOPA requirement .

So far Mr Joyce and the Minister are supporting AsA/ CASA - and therefore the further destruction of GA in this country because even CASA claims that if complied with the mandate will cost GA over $30 million. No existing safety problem is being addressed . It's shear bastardry .

Very risky I would reckon.

Update today: Courtesy the Oz

Quote:Industry pushes for reform of Civil Aviation Safety Authority [Image: mitchell_bingemann.png]


[img=0x0]http://pixel.tcog.cp1.news.com.au/track/component/author/4c134add4c3a9e4881f7841b69d9ac85/?esi=true&t_product=the-australian&t_template=s3/austemp-article_common/vertical/author/widget[/img]

[Image: f20dd861223f0cc5a1e1db0d86f41172.jpg]
Aerial Application Association of Australia CEO Phil Hurst outside Canberra Airport. Picture: Ray Strange

An alliance of Australia’s major aviation association bodies has called on the incoming government to reform the aviation ­regulator and to put in place a 100-day plan to help revive the country’s flagging general aviation industry.

Phil Hurst, chief executive of the Aerial Application Association of Australia, says aviation has the potential to drive job growth and economic activity that could add about $2 billion to government coffers if the right policy settings were adopted.

Whatever the result of tomor­row’s federal election, Mr Hurst said the new government should issue a letter of expectations to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and put in place a 100-day plan to clarify the regulator’s obligations and duties, and ensure the safe ­operation of aircraft and passenger traffic through our skies.

“At some point CASA must ­accept it does not have the expertise to be all things and it must come up with a more mature ­safety model,” Mr Hurst told The Australian. “It has always relied on a strong industry to deliver a lot of regulatory functions on its behalf — eg, training, checking, testing, etc — and it should certainly build on this to be leaner and more effective.”

Mr Hurst said a “high level” taskforce made up of industry and departmental staff should be ­established to oversee the ­implementation of the Forsyth review recommendations and that a General Aviation Directorate should be created to simplify the regulations and systems that apply to smaller operators.

The Aviation Safety Regulatory Review report, chaired by ­industry veteran David Forsyth, called in 2014 for sweeping ­reforms after it criticised CASA for taking too hard a line and maintaining an adversarial ­approach to the industry, which had lost trust in the authority.

“By committing to these relatively straightforward actions, a new government could free itself of much of the baggage that has plagued the aviation safety regulator for years, and which was comprehensively identified in the Forsyth review,” Mr Hurst said. “The last thing aviation needs is another review or delay in getting on with the job of reform of CASA and other aviation agencies.”

Mr Hurst’s calls for reform echo noises from other aviation industry groups like the Australian Aviation Associations Forum (TAAAF) and the Aircraft Owners and ­Pilots Association, which have blamed creeping over-regulation for the destruction of small aviation businesses.

A 66-page TAAAF report said it was imperative that the Civil Aviation Act was ­rewritten to align with international standards and that action must be taken to ensure education and aviation training remain on par with global best-practice.

That report also called for the realignment of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional ­Development and CASA to ­implement policy effectively and create a performance-based regulatory system. It points to Australia’s pilot certification regulations, which cover 3000 pages, whereas the same material in the US — which has better safety statistics — covers just 100 pages.

“If we get a genuine partnership with an incoming government then we can really start to make headway into making the aviation sector more vibrant and capable of generating more jobs and activity,” Mr Hurst said.

“The bottom line is that industry creates safety — every day it is the pilots and other crew, maintainers, air traffic controller, refuellers, managers etc who ­deliver safety.

“CASA’s key function is to do the quality assurance to ensure minimum standards it sets are being met. And of course to set the minimum standards in a way that enables industry safety and ­capacity rather than cripples it.

“Without an understanding of these different roles, CASA will continue to be caught up in the ‘old world’ low-trust thinking that ignited the Forsyth review.”

Choc frog for Binger... Wink



MTF...P2  Tongue
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(06-29-2016, 03:27 PM)Peetwo Wrote:  Albo mentions the "A" word - Confused

Was listening to ABC's AM program this morning and wouldn't you know it up popped the former miniscule for non-aviation Albo, bright-eyed & bushy tailed.

Well initially I started to switch off but  then he actually mentioned AVIATION - well once at least. In typical Albo form He also started swinging into the Coalition about not having a plan for infrastructure/shipping/& aviation:
Quote:MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: So this announcement today is not new money. You have already announced the $10 billion infrastructure funding model but what's new in today's announcement?


ANTHONY ALBANESE: What's new is that we're releasing a comprehensive plan for infrastructure as well as for shipping and aviation.


That's something that the current government simply hasn't done. It's extraordinary that they seem to have a 'make it up as you go along' policy when it comes to infrastructure...
Well after that Albo lisped and spat his way through more typical ALP propaganda and other than a Badgery's Airport comment aviation again wafted off into the never-ever... Dodgy
So naturally I then went in search of this elusive Labor aviation policy.
First I found this:
Quote:Flying high with Labor and a sound, safe aviation industry

 
[Image: Badgerys.jpg]
Patrick Cooney • 29th June 2016

Labor will maintain strict standards over aviation safety and focus on enhancing the role of regional airports as part of its comprehensive aviation policy released today.

Shadow infrastructure minister Anthony Albanese said a Shorten Labor government boasts a strong policy for aviation safety and jobs, which involves increasing the role of regional airports.

“Aviation is a $30b industry that directly employs tens of thousands of Australians,” Albanese said “and is critical to the ongoing development of our tourism industry.
Quote:“Ensure Australian regulations keep up with global standards.”

“Labor has always had a strong commitment to maintaining Australia’s excellent safety record.

“The former Labor government made the issue central to the production of the nation’s first Aviation White Paper in 2009, which underpins our ongoing approach to aviation.

“Aviation safety should be beyond politics and Labor will always work with other parties in the parliament to ensure Australian regulations keep up with global standards.”

Albanese, the Member for Grayndler, also spoke about the role of regional airports, having fought for Badgerys Creek airport.
Quote:“We will also continue to support the development of the Sydney West Airport at Badgerys Creek.”

“Labor will also seek to enhance the role of regional airports in Australian aviation, including by providing greater opportunities for them to attract international airlines,” he said.

“We will also continue to support the development of the Sydney West Airport at Badgerys Creek, subject to the establishment of a no-fly zone at night over existing residences.

“Labor will invest in a passenger rail connection to the airport from the day it opens to maximise the potential for job creation at the airport and aviation-related industries in the surrounding precinct.”

Only Labor has a plan for the infrastructure of Australia’s future.
 
Which basically confirms what we all suspected that Albo/ALP policy for aviation is - "Please refer to our White (Elephant) Paper".
This was further confirmed in the 8 page policy paper:
Quote:In 2009, the previous Labor Government released Australia’s only Aviation White Paper.

For the first time, the Federal Government’s long-term policy objectives for the industry

were laid out.

OUR OBJECTIVES

The White Paper listed four objectives for the industry:

n To give industry the certainty and incentive to plan and invest for the long term.

n To maintain and improve Australia’s excellent safety record.

n To give proper consideration for the interests of travellers and users of airports.

n To better manage the impact of aviation activity on communities and the environment.

There was also a mention of the Forsyth (ASRR) review report:
Quote:..Labor supported the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review led by David Forsyth, which reported in 2014. Labor supports safety regulation that is effective, fair and firm. Labor supports constructive relationships between the regulator and the industry, but harmony should not replace rigour when it comes to the safety of passengers and crew.


Labor acknowledges the many small businesses in general aviation, and the relative burden that regulation places on them. Labor will work to remove unnecessary regulation.


Labor supports an evidence and risk-based approach to targeting areas for safety improvement across the sector...

Reading between the lines predictively what Albo & the Shortone are saying is - "..UP YOURS Aviation Alphabets & associated industry rabble.." Dodgy

Confused 

Update: via OzFlying

Quote:[Image: APH.jpg]
Parliament House in Canberra (Steve Hitchen)

Labor vows to support Forsyth Recommendations
1 July 2016
 
In a policy document released this week, the Australian Labor Party (ALP) has promised to support the recommendations of the Aviation Safety Regulation Review.

The policy states:

"In the last three years, the Abbott-Turnbull Government has completed a review into the regulation of aviation safety. Labor supported this review, and a Shorten Labor Government will maintain the thrust of the recommendations. Labor believes safety in aviation is the paramount concern, and that regulatory settings in this area should be measured, prudent, and not sudden. Labor supports a regulatory approach in aviation safety that is firm but fair."

The ALP has based its 2016 policy on the Aviation White Paper produced by the previous Labor government, which has since been widely discredited by the general aviation community.

"The White Paper listed four objectives for the industry," the policy states:
  • To give industry the certainty and incentive to plan and invest for the long term
  • To maintain and improve Australia’s excellent safety record
  • To give proper consideration for the interests of travellers and users of airports
  • To better manage the impact of aviation activity on communities and the environment.
"These goals remain the elements underpinning Labor’s policy approach. The White Paper was released in the midst of the Global Financial Crisis but it anticipated better times, which have come to pass."

The ALP has also listed eight measures that it believes will support general aviation specifically:
  • Supporting the continued operation of secondary capital city airports, vital to general aviation
  • Ensuring secondary airports maintain a focus on aviation development
  • Not allowing non-aeronautical uses to compromise future aviation activity
  • Enhancing air traffic safety
  • Providing support for essential airport infrastructure and air services in remote areas
  • Ensuring the Civil Aviation Safety Authority places a high priority on supporting safety and increased professionalism in the sector
  • Backing Australia’s aircraft and component manufacturing industry through mutual recognition agreements
  • Continuing Federal Government support for exporting companies through the Export Market Development Grants scheme.
At the time of writing, no Coalition aviation policy has been released and none is likely to before the Federal Election tomorrow.

2016 ALP Aviation Policy

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...yvA9qjK.99

What's the bet Albo has already sounded out J Mac (McComic) for a return to order of the IOS - Dodgy  


MTF...P2 Tongue
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