The Sunday Brunch Gazette.
#1

Edition 1.  AP - Sunday Brunch Gazette.


Variety aplenty in this weeks wrap up. There is quite a pile of problems making their slow way through to the minister’s desk; not that there is much expectation of any being acknowledged, let alone addressed.  Jim Davis of the RAAA - Bureaucratic embuggerance of ASRR confirmed by Jim Davis.  In no uncertain terms spells out many of the industry concerns, fully supported by the equally accurate Ken Cannane of the AMROBA organisation - KC on DDDD's GA review

The Air Services ‘One Sky’ debacle, false radio transmissions, overall safety concerns, endless stream of audit and the apparent lack of SSP application to the shedding of 25% of the ASA ‘back-room’ staff continue to ring the alarm bells. Quite a story.

Airports continue to feature – toxic waste run-off into the water supplies around the aerodromes should be mainline story – but receives as little attention from the media as the destruction of the secondary airports. Tick..tick..tick..tick goes 4D Chester's PFOS clock  One or two more thorns in the thick ministerial hide, which will sooner or later, need to be addressed.

The minister continues to disappoint industry and clearly has no intention of putting the brakes on the runaway ‘safety agencies’ and gain some control of air transport. "Irony is wasted on the stupid"  - and - The end of the line in Ministerial competency

The spectre of the Pel-Air ditching off Norfolk Island is still awaiting the much delayed second ATSB report. Perhaps it is just coincidental that one of the survivors, Karen Casey is due to appear in the Supreme court of appeals next week - In the Supreme Court of Appeal;  21&22nd Nov.  we at AP all hope that Karen has an opportunity to describe some of the despicable treatment she has received for within the aviation ‘safety’ agencies system and wish her all the best for the hearing.

[size=medium][size=small][font=Verdana]From other forums: & The 'safety' conundrum – in a nutshell. - ATSB & AAAA, a partnership of sincerity - The old Soft shoe shuffle. - No favours for sister safety authority - all make for interesting reading. Of particular interest is the view folk from overseas are forming of our once great ATSB; their handling of the MH370 search and government involvement may not be big news at home; but, there is a groundswell of discontent. MH370 Aussie spin & BS continues
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#2

It would seem that through it all we have achieved little or nothing. From what one hears AVMED are processing approvals in a more timely manner. Gosh that's wonderful. Looks like we've achieved a review of the decline of GA. Gosh that's wonderful. They are working on the (mild) Forsyth reforms and Pelair might be all revealed one of these days. Gosh....

No publicity and no political incentive or leadership equals no change. Our public masters rule the roost and take the money home as usual. What happened to the Tamworth momentum?
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#3

Newton applied.

Sandy -"What happened to the Tamworth momentum?"

It is a fair question Sandy; but was there any ‘real’ momentum from the Tamworth tin shed party?  Momentum implies movement to begin with.

The quantity of motion of a moving body, measured as a product of its mass and velocity.

The impetus gained by a moving object.
"the vehicle gained momentum as the road dipped"

To gain momentum, inertia must first be overcome.

a tendency to do nothing or to remain unchanged.
"the bureaucratic inertia of the various tiers of government.

a property of matter by which it continues in its existing state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, unless that state is changed by an external force.

Tamworth failed, miserably, to overcome the inertia; it is that simple. What it did manage to do was show both Chester and Joyce for what they truly are; and did not (IMO) raise great hopes that the CASA board would , could or was even interested in ‘reform’. What has happened is a cone of silence has descend and all the defence mechanisms have been activated; particularly the ministerial ones. A creature like DDDD has only one interest, political survival. Any interest shown in ‘governance’ is purely coincidental and then only when it promotes the minister and garners votes. Tamworth scared the crap out of ‘mister popularity’, the dog hater could not care less, he is too secure. Both reacted in a predictable manner.

DDDD is too self obsessed to have anything spoil the image, so he toddled off to the word weasels and ‘sought advice’; an easy catch for Iron Wrong, they will reassure and provide, in plain English, (little words) the approved, official ‘ministerial little book of standard answers’. All DDD has to do is look up the question, turn to the appropriate page and – there’s the ‘proper’ answer. That delivered he can stand back and watch the machinery run, delaying, deferring, and denying all, as the clock to the next election ticks down. Win-win; nothing gets done of course, but the right people are happy and Tamworth just an unpleasant, distant memory.

That said, you have to, no matter how grudgingly, admire the ‘machine’; a three decade innings, millions upon millions of dollars poured down the urinal wall before Barmybaby’s small contribution. Not only has any sort of ‘external’ force failed to overcome the ‘inertia’ but ‘they’ have actually managed to get things organised to overcome that external force - . That’s right – reverse gear. Take regulatory reform as an example; you would think that in 30 years the original laws, which, way back then, were deemed too complex and restrictive, would have changed to avoid being ‘complex and restrictive’. Are they now? Are they Duck.

To paraphrase both Shakespeare and Falkner “Tamworth was full of sound and fury – signifying Nada”. There was nothing to capitalize on, nothing to build on and no interest from the government. Now if we wanted to campaign for ‘land rights for gay whales’ we may stand a chance, even get a grant to research ‘ways and means’. There’s more chance of that happening than there is of the CASA leopard changing it’s spots, under ministerial edict. Even if DDDD had the interest, the  balls and the brains to do anything, they’d just tell him, Oh, so politely to piss off.

Smartest thing AOPA did was to sign up with TAAAF. At least then the ‘pressure’ (commercial, legal and operational) that can and will if required, be brought to bear on small, dependent groups can be distributed and sound advice from serious players can be provided to relieve the pressures. AOPA need CASA – CASA do not need the AOPA; quite the reverse I’d say.

Anyway – I’m getting cranky; so, I shall leave you there with Newton, inertia and momentum for company.

Toot toot
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#4

SBG: Letters of despair - Dodgy

In reference to Sandy's post, here follows a non-abbreviated version off one of the regular email chains, which IMO translates a far greater message than the abbreviated version... Wink 

Quote:Gentlemen,


I'm asking if the plan for another meeting is still a live consideration? 

This could be a game changer if thoroughly planned to maximise publicity. I would have thought that at last we have a united front to present to the general public and media. 

AOPA's rational plan for medical exam reforms have not been accepted, apparently they are looking at it. Until action you would have to be foolish to believe they will move on this.  Has the Minister or the Board said one word about the merit of such a reform? All talk no action, situation normal, feed the chooks. 

Otherwise it would seem that through it all we have achieved little or nothing. From what one hears AVMED are processing approvals in a more timely manner. This is great progress. 

Looks like we've achieved a review of the decline of GA. Is this a joke?

They are working on (mild) Forsyth reforms and Pelair might be all revealed one of these days. Gosh....

John Quadrio, Dom James etc smashed, not a hint of restitution. 

Hundreds or thousands (?) of variations to ICAO standards. 

A rule set 27 years and hundreds of millions in the making being made 'workable', sort of, with dozens (hundreds?) of exemptions. 

Pilots coming in on 457 working visas, seems we don't train enough for our own market. 

Unique Aussie rules that handicap us from competing in world markets. Maintenance personnel another disaster area, see AMROBA valiantly trying to inject reason, to promote a healthy industry. All on deaf ears. 

ADS B, no change.

Fee gouging running unabated, can you believe $8000 and six months, using the CASA standard manual, for a single instructor flying school? I'm told this was an exceptionally low price.

No publicity and no political incentive or leadership equals no change. Our public masters rule the roost and take the money home as usual. What happened to the Tamworth momentum? 

Very disapointed that AOPA has given any word of support for yet another review, if we sit and wait again we simply play their game. Over and over and over again they treat us like children, offering up another toffee apple, or perhaps a better analogy, a carrot to the donkey. 

Sandy
 
So Sandy nails it and "K" translates the frustrating dichotomy and the only real hope the industry has:
Quote:...To paraphrase both Shakespeare and Falkner “Tamworth was full of sound and fury – signifying Nada”. There was nothing to capitalize on, nothing to build on and no interest from the government. Now if we wanted to campaign for ‘land rights for gay whales’ we may stand a chance, even get a grant to research ‘ways and means’. There’s more chance of that happening than there is of the CASA leopard changing it’s spots, under ministerial edict. Even if DDDD had the interest, the  balls and the brains to do anything, they’d just tell him, Oh, so politely to piss off.

Smartest thing AOPA did was to sign up with TAAAF. At least then the ‘pressure’ (commercial, legal and operational) that can and will if required, be brought to bear on small, dependent groups can be distributed and sound advice from serious players can be provided to relieve the pressures...

I am in agreement with both Sandy & Kharon that with the repeated obfuscation of 80 odd recommendations and many worthwhile findings from independent reviews, parliamentary inquiries, Senate Estimate inquisitions etc; that time is well past any real, sincere political fix to the industry woes.

However maybe within the current balance of power and the make up of the Senate there is a real political pressure point that a combined TAAAF/industry could effectively exploit... Huh

Recently (11 October) LDP Senator Leyonhjelm surprisingly got up a private members motion for a Senate Inquiry into red tape:
Quote:[Image: censorship-610101_960_720-1440x564_c.jpg]
Leyonhjelm looks to slash the red tape
October 11, 2016
The Senate agreed today to launch an inquiry into red tape.
To be led by Liberal Democrats Senator David Leyonhjelm, the Senate Select Committee will provide a rare overview of how red tape imposed on us by three levels of government affects our economy and impacts on our lives.
Senator Leyonhjelm says the inquiry will take a fresh look at how much bureaucratic oversight we really need.
There are nearly 500 bodies involved in policy design at the commonwealth level alone, and many of them are red tape factories,” Senator Leyonhjelm said. “This would help explain why Australian businesses and individuals are now burdened by over 30,000 different licenses, permits and approvals.
This mindset also helps explain why construction of the Roy Hill iron ore mine required 4147 licences, permits and approvals, and why it costs $10,000 and 847 hours of training to become a hairdresser in NSW,” he said.
One study by the Institute of Public Affairs estimates red tape costs us more than $176 billion in foregone economic output annually.
Senator Leyonhjelm said public submissions will be called for later this year.
I encourage members of the public to think about making submissions to the inquiry, because this will help to guide the direction of the hearings that will start next year.”

Senator Leyonhjelm put forward the proposition that a 'red tape' committee be formed under the following resolutions:
Quote:Committee Resolution:


  1. That a select committee, to be known as the Red Tape Committee, be established to inquire into and report on, by 1 December 2017, the effect of restrictions and prohibitions on business (red tape) on the economy and community, with particular reference to:
    1. the effects on compliance costs (in hours and money), economic output, employment and government revenue, with particular attention to industries, such as mining, manufacturing, tourism and agriculture, and small business;
    2. any specific areas of red tape that are particularly burdensome, complex, redundant or duplicated across jurisdictions;
    3. the impact on health, safety and economic opportunity, particularly for the low-skilled and disadvantaged;
    4. the effectiveness of the Abbott, Turnbull and previous governments’ efforts to reduce red tape;
    5. the adequacy of current institutional structures (such as Regulation Impact Statements, the Office of Best Practice Regulation and red tape repeal days) for achieving genuine and permanent reductions to red tape;
    6. alternative institutional arrangements to reduce red tape, including providing subsidies or tax concessions to businesses to achieve outcomes currently achieved through regulation;
    7. how different jurisdictions in Australia and internationally have attempted to reduce red tape; and
    8. any related matters.
  2. That the committee consist of 7 senators, 2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, 1 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, 1 nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens, and 3 to be nominated by other parties and independent senators.
  3. That:
    1. participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, the Leader of the Australian Greens or any other party or any independent senator;
    2. participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee; and
    3. a participating member shall be taken to be a member of the committee for the purpose of forming a quorum of the committee.
  4. That 3 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.
  5. That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that all members have not been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.
  6. That the committee elect as chair and deputy chair a member nominated by the aforementioned other parties and independent senators.
  7. That the deputy chair shall act as chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.
  8. That the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, may appoint another member of the committee to act as chair during the temporary absence of both the chair and deputy chair at a meeting of the committee.
  9. That, in the event of an equality of voting, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, has a casting vote.
  10. That the committee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings, the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.
  11. That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.
  12. That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such documents and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

Now IOS members may make derogatory comments like..

"..Not another bloody inquiry.."

.."or just a bunch of independent, no nothing, Senator Wannabes trying to make a name for themselves" ..but here is what the respected IPA (Institute of Public affairs) said about the Senator Leyonhjelm initiative:
Quote:MEDIA RELEASE
| Evan Mulholland
[Image: MR-Pic.png]Free market think tank the Institute of Public Affairs welcomes Liberal Democrat Senator David Leyonhjelm's establishment of a Senate Select Committee into Australia's red tape problem.
"Red tape is Australia's most pressing economic challenge. This inquiry presents an opportunity to revitalise the Commonwealth's red tape reduction agenda," said IPA spokesperson Evan Mulholland.
"Institute of Public Affairs research estimates that red tape costs Australia more than $176 billion in foregone economic output every year. That translates into a staggering $19,300 red tape cost per Australian household."
"IPA research has found that red tape is particularly burdensome for mining, agriculture and small business. Red tape holds back development, slows job creation and hampers Australian prosperity."
"The IPA believes the Senate Select Committee should particularly focus on environmental approvals, legal delays to major projects and red tape harming small businesses."
"Only by cutting red tape will the Turnbull government or a future Labor government be able to deliver the economic growth and prosperity they are promising."
"The IPA urges industries and businesses to contribute to this Senate Select Committee to expose the heavy red tape burden imposed by all levels of government in Australia," said Mr Mulholland.
For media and comment: Evan Mulholland, Media and Communications Manager, on 0405 140 780, or at emulholland@ipa.org.au
 
Download document

CASA's 30+years & 300+million dollars of RRP - for what?? 

IMO this could be a perfect opportunity for industry, with the TAAAF leading, to create a classic 'case study' for the Senate committee on the extreme damage that 'red tape' can inflict on an industry and these guys hold the balance of power - just saying.. Rolleyes


MTF...P2 Cool
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#5

The bureaucratic bubble will
burst....question is when?


The Westminster system is imploding in on itself. The past half a century of Government incompetence in western society combined with an insatiable appetite for distancing oneself from accountability and transparency, plus the continuous adding of rules and regulations by forever paranoid Governments has in some ways caused a balloon. A ballooning system that is now unworkable, bogged down, failing at every inch of its structure, collapsing under its own weight of unworkable, outdated and incompatible laws.

Look at the results of Government incompetence - Americas election, Australia's last election, Brexit, Germany independents, political parties in Holland, Iceland, most of Europe, Italy, Spain, Ireland and others. All countries having independents, out of left field groups, all moving away from the traditional political bullshit of liberal/labor, democrat/republic style parties. The IOS are revolting against the system, everywhere!!! They are tired of the elites and politicians being the only beneficiaries of wealth worldwide, while everyone else has their lives, futures, and children's futures decimated so that the 1% and their political footstools can gorge themselves on obscene wealth.

You call us a democracy? A country of freedom and opportunity? Seriously! We are a society where big brother monitors our every move, bank transaction, blog, speed infraction, financial earnings, holiday location, fart in public or purchase at IGA.
Freedom and democracy my ass. So you have the freedom to run your business as you like do you? No tax penalties for a BAS that is submitted 24 hours late? No exuberant import taxes on that piece of plant you need for work?  No unworkable and ridiculous rules and regulations? No burgeoning WHS laws that are so far out of fucking kilter that it is beyond belief? No strangulation of your business by Government red tape and bureaucracy at every twist and curve? You don't get treated like a criminal by the tax department or a WHS inspector? You still consider yourself to be part of a middle class? Sorry - news flash, it doesn't exist anymore.

Aargh yes Democracy in our lucky country hey? A dream that is believed by those still stuck inside the Matrix and oblivious to the real world. Corralled sheep who don't even realise they have been penned.

Tick Tock Governments, the people have had enough and it's coming to a head. If you Poliies can't see that then you are in for a rude awakening. You can only ever push people so far, and then it comes to a head and the people revolt. That day has been escalating in recent years and the chickens are coming home to roost. None of your secure mansions, guarded workplaces, BMW's or 'mates' will be able to slow the tide once it escalates. Just sayin........
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#6

- and fools never differ.

Funny coincidence department GD – P7, myself and a couple of others had the same discussion – Sunday – about history and revolutions. When you look back, the parallels are remarkable; nearly every revolution kicked off the same way; ordinary folk totally pissed of with the way things were. Mild protest ignored; leading to angry outcry and repression; this always followed up by a blood bath which usually ended up with the ‘ruling’ minority slaughtered.

All the signs of revolution are, once again, clearly visible; those signs, once again, are being ignored. I doubt it will lead to blood and slaughter in Australia; but everyone I talk to is totally pissed off with the ‘government’ hand in their hip pocket; from council through to parliament. Nearly all are fed up with being ‘over governed’, red tape and the petty tyrants who make life more difficult than it need be etc. We here are still in the ‘mild protest’ stage, Brexit and the Trump victory clear indications of that protest vote. I reckon as the gap between the wealthy and the poor widens in Australia the louder and longer the protest will become. Mostly due to piss poor economical management. Australia (IMO) has degenerated from being a place where; if you were prepared to work hard, you could live very, very well and progress: to a place where you are flat out, working your arse off to stay ahead of the bills and taxes and stay out of serious debt.  Even the humble dream of owning your own home is drifting out of the reach of many. When you add this to the increasing number of government imposed restrictions and ‘sensitivities’ you find an unhappy populace. We have all seen and history bears clear witness to what happens when the burden becomes ‘unbearable’; starting with disaffected, educated, unemployable youth, who cannot see a way forward.

Aye, ‘tis a puzzle -  

“Three things too much, and three too little are pernicious to man; to speak much, and know little; to spend much, and have little; to presume much, and be worth little”. Cervantes.

Toot - toot.
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#7

SBG- II.

Australia’s ATSB involvement with the MH 370 has topped the numbers this week and is now some 30,000 ‘views’ ahead of subject related threads. No surprise, sooner or later the chickens would come home to roost; the latest departmental sleight of hand in the form of a very slippery move by the minister, a play on words which promised to reveal the results of the not so secret meeting of the ‘Search Strategy Working Group’.  P2 follows up the shameful tale – HERE - ably assisted by the Australian (Higgins) and Brock McEwan. Many believe it is time to ask the minister “what the hell are you playing at?”.  

While that question is being obfuscated; the endless game of ADSB deadline for compliance  continues; the latest in the form of an extension to that deadline for ‘light aircraft’; for which, many will breath a sigh of relief; others will be angered, having spent the dollars to have the mandated equipment installed. There have been some truly dreadful ‘ministers’ for aviation; whether it was Karma or irony which arranged matters to have one of the most inept in charge at a time when ‘aviation’ is on the point of revolution or collapse, is a question you must answer for yourself. But disaster for Chester, the responsible minister looms on every front and he is being ‘advised’ by those who created the unbelievable mess. Go figure. ‘Hitch’ writing in the ‘Australian Flying’ magazine sums it up neatly in his Blog ‘last minute Hitch’.

Airports have been a feature - if there ever was a plan to ‘sell ‘em all off’ it is well and truly buggered now; the cost of decontamination and compensation alone is massive and that is before the class actions start rolling in – more UAV’s for the minister to dodge. – Sen Rhiannon.

Speaking of ‘Drones’ and hot sausages being delivered to parliament house; the drone debate has gone slightly viral; and, with the ministerial pants down, caught out by CASA failing, dismally, to see the future and the legal ramifications of avoiding the issue the topic could see some amazing back-flips before its done MTF? – pretty safe bet.

Lastly, the Air Services ‘big hole’ keeps getting deeper; the latest news that front line ATC managers are taking VR no great surprise to anyone. The only surprise is that they have stuck with the system so long, particularly now with the unspeakable ‘Wodger’ deeply entrenched and creating the usual discord; but we are not supposed to discuss that element; we will, but not just yet. One Sky and the rest of the ASA billion dollar imbroglio is a story which keep us entertained (and poor) for a while longer yet and we do not expect any incisive ‘ministerial’ action to prevent the inevitable. Enjoy the Commonwealth Procurement Inquiry; JCPAA and the Senators will. MTF? Another safe bet.
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#8

The following is an article published in the Australian Newspaper in 2009.

The "Public Service" in the past, served the public pretty well. The servants of the public
were modestly remunerated and in the way of compensation were given guaranteed tenure of appointment
and perks way beyond what a private employee could expect, they by and large served the interests
of those they worked for.
In the modern era the public service has increasingly become self serving. The Mandarins have built
their "Empires" driven their remuneration to obscene levels, and focused more on control and their own self interest, than the public good.
Their political masters, who we elect to direct and manage the bureaucrats likewise have turned into self serving opportunists. Soft corruption is tolerated, if not encouraged, incompetence rewarded and any semblance of ministerial control subverted by the mandarins who know exactly how to pander to the whims,fears and ego's of their political masters, they control them exactly as they control us.

They are now busily subverting the Rule of Law in this country knowing full well that only the wealthy can obtain "Justice".
Justice for the ordinary citizen is unaffordable.
Robin Speed in his article warns us of the consequences our apathy will lead us to. There are signs that people are finally starting to realise what has been done to them, hopefully now the groundswell of "revolution" can temper the power of the bureaucrats.

It may be an opportune time to re-read Robin Speed's missive and remind ourselves that since 2009 nothing has changed, if anything it has got worse.
Our apathy, divisions and self interest have given the mandarins a free hand, it really is time for Industry as a whole to come together and start the revolution.
Just how much has over regulation cost this country, in productivity, innovation, employment and a just culture.

The rise and rise of the regulators

IN 2009, more than 50,000 pages of new laws were enacted at the federal, state and territory levels. These were in addition to the 100,000s of pages of existing laws.
The consequences are serious. The first is that Australia will cease to be a world leader in being governed in accordance with the rule of law, and instead become ruled by law (there being a fundamental difference). Secondly, the rule of law will be progressively replaced by the rule of the regulator, the antithesis of the rule of law.
As the number and complexities of laws increase, there is a corresponding decrease in knowing and voluntarily observing the laws by the community. And, as it becomes practically impossible for the community to know, let alone apply the law, ensuring compliance is passed to the persons charged with administering the laws - such as ASIC, ACCC, ATO - the regulators. However, it is not practical for the regulators to enforce the mass of laws against everyone, nor even against one person, all the time. They therefore announce how they will apply the law, impose penalties on those who act otherwise, and reward those who act in accordance with their blessings. A few are prosecuted as a warning to the rest of the community. In this way, the rule of the regulator begins.
The result is a fundamental shift in the relationship between the individual and the law. Increasingly, the relationship is not of the individual knowing and complying with what the law states, but of knowing and complying with what the regulators state the law states, and then knowing the extent to which the regulators will apply the law as stated by them.
For many, the new relationship focuses on not being seen by the regulators; keeping the lowest possible profile on those matters that the regulators prioritise for enforcement. What is of practical importance is the relationship of the individual with the regulators. For in such an environment few have the time, fortitude or money to be visible to the regulators and to apply the law in a way that differs from the one taken by the regulators. This new relationship can also be readily observed by the practical necessity of going cap in hand to the regulators for approval to carry out many transactions. For example, in the last eight years the ATO has issued more than 80,000 private rulings on what it says the law says (these rulings became law to the applicant, regardless of what the High Court might declare the law to mean for the rest of the community). No new law administers itself. More and more people are required to be employed by regulators to enforce an increasing number of laws. This becomes difficult, and the next stage in the shift to regulator rule begins.
One of the first signs of this shift is the conferral on the regulators of more and more powers of search, access to private property, detention, telephone tapping, together with the increase in penalties. This happens not because a material number of Australians have suddenly become terrorists or members of organised crime. Rather, the intimidation of existing powers is believed insufficient to obtain compliance, so greater powers and harsher penalties are deemed necessary. Yet the futility of forcing compliance in this way was seen centuries ago by the penalty of hanging for stealing a loaf of bread. Further, the regulators increasingly find it difficult before an independent court to obtain a conviction. The regulators know that a crime has been committed but are frustrated because they have not the powers to get the evidence or get the court to agree with their view of the law. For those who doubt whether Australia is at this stage, they need look no further than the recent unsuccessful prosecutions by ASIC.
One of the other signs of the rule of the regulator is the attempt to reverse the onus of proof so that the regulators can get convictions to send a clear message to the rest of the community. The Australian courts are a real impediment to regulators in this regard as they insist that no one is presumed to be guilty unless proved so. However, if an Act reverses the onus of proof a court can do nothing. The legislative attempts to reverse the onus of proof come in several forms, often behind a government announcement (regardless of political persuasion) that it is "streamlining" or "codifying" the existing laws. This is often accompanied by government publicity demonising the group to be subject to the new law. It is fundamental to the Australian way of life that everyone, whether an alleged terrorist or member of organised crime group, or an ordinary Australian, is presumed to be innocent until the prosecution proves otherwise. Any attempts to weaken that principle must be strongly and loudly resisted.

Robin Speed is president of the Rule of Law Association of Australia.
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#9

Big brother, kiss my ass

Thorny, top marks. A couple of succinct articles in your post. And oh how true are they! No wonder people are trying to go 'off the grid' and escape the neo-nazi society and micro managed and abused world that us robots have become.

Big brother at its worst - last year a close relative of mine said 'duck it family, we need to unwind, let's visit the mouse'. So off the family of five trudge to Disney Florida to enjoy 2 weeks of rides, fantasy, fun and frivolity. Tick. However upon return,  parent (a) discovers their child benefits or whatever they call it these days has been 'cut off'. Yes cancelled, stopped, removed, gooonski. All actioned by whom we shall call "Department Dipshit" (I don't know what they call the department these days). Parent (a) says to parent (b) 'WTF is this shit about'? Parent (b) who is no longer part of the Matrix, and hasn't been for some years, smells a somewhat distrusting rat! Anyway, parent (a) raises the issue with Department Dipshit and the fortnightly payments are promptly reinstated.
So parent (b) phones a friend (who we shall call 'Lonewolf',who works for Government and asks him the question; what do you reckon all this shit is about? Lone wolf advises that when the family departed for their Disney adventure their passports sent little messages through cyberspace to Big Brothers computers. After 10 days the computers decided that the poor Family was taking the piss out of the Government and should not receive family benefits while enjoying 2 weeks in Florida! Mr computer, always suspicious of potential rorts (something a Politician wouldn't never do) fears that said family may be leaving Oz forever, or going on a 6 month cash financed holiday (from the cash tin buried in the backyard), or who knows what other paranoid concern Big Brother has. And we simply cannot allow that.

Point being; Governments are drowning in fear, regulations, laws, red tape and mismanagement. To harass a family over $196.00 while these thieving and corrupt fuckers spend, waste, misappropriate and mismanage tens of billions of dollars per year, and then some, is a disgrace. But it is proof that the system is flawed and has failed. But it does also shed light on why people like Ma and Pa Kettle are slowly waking up to the bullshit they are being shovel fed daily by the 'public servants'.

Tick Tock goes the revolutionary clock
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#10

Sir An(g)us Houston kisses some USA ass!

Angus Houston chips US alliance critics

Angus Houston said he was disappointed by critics of the US Alliance after the US election.

Former Chief of the Defence Force Angus Houston has attacked critics of the US alliance such as former prime minister Paul Keating.

Mr Houston warned cutting links with the United States would force Australia to hike defence spending to as much as 4 per cent of GDP and that membership of ASEAN cannot guarantee Australia's security.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull reassured those nervous about a Trump presidency, saying Australia is the most influential ally of the US amid a fierce domestic political debate over the future of the alliance.

Former prime minister Paul Keating recently proposed Australia "cut the tag" with US foreign policy and build up an independent foreign policy and stronger ties to Asia and ASEAN, while former foreign minister Gareth Evans said Australia needs to build security ties in the region and rely less on the US.

Opposition foreign affairs minister Penny Wong then suggested Australia should take a more critical approach to the US alliance, while the Greens called for a complete review and accompanying debate on whether Australia should maintain its US alliance.

Stick to 'the glue'

Mr Houston said comments by critics were "disappointing" and a proposal for Australia to join ASEAN, as Mr Keating suggested, would not provide the security Australia needs.

"The United States is the stabilising glue that binds the region together, and there simply is no substitute for it. ASEAN is not cohesive enough to be robust on security issues," he said in an opinion piece in The Australian Financial Review.

He also said such a move to step down our ties to the US could be costly. "If we lose the US alliance and the powerful security insurance it provides, we also lose access to its intelligence and its technology. It is likely we would have to increase defence spending from 3 per cent to 4 per cent of GDP. That would have a dramatic effect on public programs like health and education," he said.

On Wednesday, Mr Turnbull reassured Washington the government would not be altering its allegiances.

"Those who assert that our ties and our alliance with the United States should be reconsidered fail to recognise that a strong trusted forthright Australia is a powerful force for good, whether it is on the fields of conflict or in the corridors of power in Washington.

"The fact is that the United States remains our most important strategic and defence ally," he said.

Mr Turnbull said while Australia has "robust" laws "to protect us from [terror] threats", Australia would now work towards "a national strategy for places of mass gathering", after such terror attacks as the one in Nice, France.

In response, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten used the opportunity to accuse Immigration Minister Peter Dutton of playing into the hands of extremists after he said Sunni-Muslim Lebanese-Australians were mostly responsible for terror offences in Australia.

http://www.afr.com/news/angus-houston-ch...123-gsvvro

So why doesn't that surprise me? He has always been a weak spineless ass kisser. At least Keating for all his faults has a set of balls.

Toot 'lick lick' toot
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#11

SBG - 27/11/16.

The indefatigable P2 has had a busy week collecting news from the front; lots of it and all worthy of consideration. There is a little something for everyone from the grudging extension of time to allow those who must save their pennies for the ADSB fit-out, to two full blown inquiries. Spoiled for choice and a lot of material to wade through. In no particular order:-

On the plus side – a victory for Airworthiness, finally. The long delay on the change to law, which has been hanging about like a bad smell since the 2008 audit has finally, after industry (KC – CF) showed the way been brought into the light. Well done the (JSCT) ‘Treaties’ committee; our Senators and Fawcett all deserve Tim Tams.

The Kessing appearance at the Senate inquiry is a must watch, the public part of the videoed testimony reveals a honest man, doing his best and the Senate committee in full flight. This Senate committee just keeps impressing, the real, tangible, good governance od men of good will, hard at work.

That JSCPAA committee is looking deeply into the murky financial dealings of the ASA and not much  liking what they see and hear. You will need your BS meter set to high and a strong stomach to listen and watch as Halfwit and his ‘match-fit’ team of sacrificial lambs turn up to play the committee first XI. But if you want to see how a billion dollar a year monopoly spends your money, it is a must watch event.

CASA are still in denial and not taking their collective heads out of the sand to see the potential liabilities and dangers of ‘Drones’ delivering pizza’s. They seem incapable of realising that the first 400 feet of a take off and the last 400 feet of a landing is the most dangerous part of the flight and seem quite happy to allow the ‘little’ unlicensed, uncontrolled, unregulated toys to do what they please – up to 400 feet.  Go figure.

ATSB had a very soft ride through their ‘Estimates’ appearance. There is plenty of scope for the Senate committee to play with, the overdue Norfolk report, Hoods conflict of interest, the pathetic attempt to correlate ‘bird strike’ with ‘drone strike’; ridiculous.  But then, so is the whole ATSB ‘thing’.

The full story of contaminated water and land made useless has not, as yet, had the media attention it deserves. As the aerodrome infrastructure collapses the statements of denial and escape clauses are being polished, ready for use, if the truth of this horror story ever makes it to an inquiry. Airports - for sale - bargain prices.

Aye. Not the first time; the wheels have fallen off the aviation governance bus. It never gets fixed though, they just push the wreckage off the road and buy a new one, bigger, better with more escape hatches than before. Such is the decades old way of running the nations air transport system.
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#12

Managed to catch up – information overload this week and delays are a feature of the modern world.  No matter – Sunday Brunch on Monday – HERE.

Toot toot.
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#13

Government reduces aircraft noise.

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Of all the government manufactured headlines this week the glorious truth is accurately, for once, reflected in the headline. Rumour has it that ‘minister’ has modestly declined to acknowledge the leadership role he played in achieving this remarkable feat, preferring instead to allow the CASA to take the kudos.  At the nations major city secondary airports the number of noise complaints has progressively dropped to record lows, which makes not only the Greens happy, but the land developers who are already making plans for shopping centres and big blocks of flats, ecstatic.  Those who bought ‘cheaply’ near to these airports, then began a campaign of whining about ‘noise’ are hoping to sell at a profit, so they can buy in a less noise affected area.  Yes, it is indeed a red letter day for the minister. Of course there is, as always, a lunatic minority protest. This outlandish protest is based on the scurrilous notion that complaints are down only because the aviation sector is not flying - moribund: stifled by government red tape, costs, draconian rules and mass embuggerance.  This , as the minister will happily tell you, is just a few tendentious bloggers making trouble. Rejoice Australia, the future of aviation is in good hands.

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On aircraft noise & secondary airports - the bell is tolling.. Confused  

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Then, to add the gravy, in one of the most shamelessly manipulated headlines of all times, the minister has announced that the ‘burden’ on aviation has been dramatically reduced – No doubt heads will roll for placing the minister in such an embarrassing position. For there is not a scrap of real reduction in the whole package.

One of the ministers great concerns is the shabby attempt to pull the wool over the nations eyes by the ATSB. Rumour has it that he knows that aircraft banging into each other on the ground is a very dangerous thing. But those rascals in the ATSB are trying to pass off this increasing trend as ‘light contact and of no significance’. The minister has carpeted Hood and demanded to know why the repeated incidents, developing a concerning trend, have been treated in such a Cavalier manner. Seriously, who’d want to be a minister when 150 tons of aircraft and 300 odd people go up in smoke, next to the terminal building full of people and a ramp loaded with aircraft. Conflagration city or what?   

Australia’s struggle to avoid compliance with ICAO continues, unabated. Despite the bullets flying and other nations becoming more ICAO compliant as good sense overrules a unique approach. The mighty pile of ‘differences’ remains untouched as tiger teams set about redrafting the redraft of the rewrite of the amendment to the amendment which was made for the second version, which needed a redraft. They will, one day win the battle to get the proposed rules into law.  

In other news, the mighty AMROBA continues to confound the ‘government’ experts with common sense and logic.  In concert with the united TAAAF group the attempt to bring sanity into Australia’s aviation regulations continues, despite subtle attempts from ‘the establishment’ to divide and conquer, as they done so many times before. The battle continues, with Dick Smith and friends cheering from the sidelines.

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If you do nothing else, try to catch up with the MH 370 mystery and the Mike Chillit data.
This remarkable man has, almost single handed, debunked many of the myths and produced data which, in all probability will redefine the search are. It is anyone’s guess what will happen next; clearly the search cannot just be abandoned, not until data, such as Chillit’s has been examined. Should it prove to be ‘accurate’, then there is little excuse for not continuing the search.  It is not just the ‘families’ who need to know what occurred; the entire aviation world needs to know, simply as a matter of public safety. What if this event happened again?


There; I’ve reached the end of my page, happy Sunday reading.

Toot toot.
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#14

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Christmas Sunday Brunch.

Seems an appropriate day to wish one and all a very merry Christmas; or, happy Hanukah for yesterday; or, just peace in our time – for 24 hours at least. GD managed to get a short video made which messages the cloistered peace and harmony of a convent.




Time to drone on – the esteemed Senate RAAT committee have called for an inquiry into the hodge- podge of names which represent ‘drones’ and the operation thereof. Which is an excellent notion.

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There are 69 submissions registered to the committee so far; ranging from the ludicrous ‘Domino Pizza’ delivery publicity stunt, through to the wise words and good counsel of Phil Hurst and the AAAA.  While we are at it; the UK CAA have taken a very grown up stance on the matter and have a terrific public awareness program running; which, if CASA gave a fundamental, they would copy. I don’t like ‘variable statistics’; the notion of a one in one million chance of not being clobbered by a ‘drone’ being a classic example of why not – are you number one with a million chances left; or number 999,999,99 and next on the list? Now then, Popular Mechanics is not a magazine given to hysteria or supports lunacy, this published article is a ‘must read’ and worthy of consideration by those who have an absolute, unshakable faith in Murphy’s Law.  CW found it and wins a Choc Frog.
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The minister continues to delight the bureaucrats by saying absolutely nothing until he has his cue cards and not doing anything until instructed. It is difficult to pick one story out of the many on offer; the Allianz story from Mitch Bingeman; or the dramatic drop in ‘aircraft noise’ complaints reflecting an industry grinding to a halt; the MH370 search saga; the Air Services audits; the ATSB ‘investigation’ farce; or the CASA lip service to ‘reform’ but still relying on the published McConvict little book of how to do it. Spoiled for choice I’d say; but I must pick one to start you off – howzabout the inimitable Ken Cannane and AMROBA.

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There is some light entertainment; for example AOPA takes a wild air swing at the ASA about a printing error and misses by a mile. P2 tacked the story onto a post, which will set you on the right path.

The ATSB have had a quiet week, carefully monitoring and shuffling reports about from here to there. It is proving difficult to understand what a ‘trend’ actually is as ATSB see it. Seems repeated loading errors, data entry errors and the odd collision between aircraft parked on the ramp and push back, start up aircraft leaving the ramp don’t signify. But, none of this is the truly, really, seriously scary part; no Siree; seems the Beaker, beyond all reason is being enshrined as religion and Hood as it’s acolyte in chief.  You know ‘we’ don’t bang on about the shortcomings in the ATSB system just for fun – it is only a matter of time before there is an incident where the sloppy report work, produced at great expense, is part of the causal chain.

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Which takes to the end of the search for MH 370; like it or not. Seems that unless someone can actually put a cross on a map and guarantee that the aircraft is directly underneath the mark; then the tripartite governments will not look any further. Catch up with the tale from the Captains Log.

Seems like yesterday I was sat here wondering whether to bother writing ‘Twas the night before Christmas’ twiddle; yet here I sit, wondering, yet again, about the same list of problems we started the New Year with. No matter, enough for today - enjoy the holiday, stay safe; wherever and whoever you are.

Toot - Merry Christmas – toot.
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#15

“K” - “[and] the odd collision between aircraft parked on the ramp and push back, start up aircraft leaving the ramp don’t signify.

I bow to the ‘K’ mastery of working wood; but, as a ‘bush carpenter’ I have, on occasion knocked the odd nail or two in; dead straight. But, the quote above hits the nail, dead straight, at the correct weight, with an uncanny accuracy.

Scenario: engine spool up; fuel in: lit – bang. Oh dear: (aka WTF); a light contact.  FDS the turbine is doing 14,000 rpm (ish) at about 7-800 ˚C. the exhaust romping out of the back end. What if fuel is sprayed out of a ruptured wing tank – just for a second – before the start sequence is terminated.

Wake up ATSB. For pities sake, wake up; before something goes terribly wrong.
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#16

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SBG. Jan 1, 2017.

Well; 2017 arrives.

We could, I suppose, look forward with hope for a better, safer, saner world; but since the cave mankind has been trying that, without too much success. I find, as the years roll by that it’s the small things which bring cheer and happiness – things like the bus arriving on time, or two green lights in a row and a journey from A-B without a traffic snarl costing you precious hours which could be spent doing other, pleasanter things.  It is just as well these small pleasures happen once a while. Expecting the big ticket items getting ‘sorted’ to cheer you seems as unrealistic now as it was when I first fully realised there were such things. Life on Earth has always been so; war, famine, pestilence, poverty etc.  But I do think it is reasonable to expect a certain amount of ‘good news’, particularly in relation to things that can be changed, fairly quickly, simply and inexpensively.

Like, say for example the Australian aviation industry, where, clearly it is to everyone’s advantage to make things ‘better’. Did that happen in 2016? Of course not. Could it have happened in 2016? It bloody well should have – alas. Australian aviation enters the new year still burdened by the same troubles; the same unresolved issues, the same deft deflection of meaningful reform, the same denial that there are serious problems. Mind you, as the industry shrinks, real reform and good management become of less concern to the people who not only created the aberration, but have the power to fix it. Amazing. Enough of my maudlin waffle – now, where was I. Ah, yes.

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For sheer entertainment value the ‘drone’ saga continues to delight, gloriously illustrating the inability of CASA to manage matters aeronautical. The entire story from go to whoa is a classic tale of ineptitude, incompetence, ministerial ignorance and arse covering. All there, a complete snap-shot of the expensive totally inept, expensive, lazy, expensive, shiftless, expensive, useless expensive system, from the minister down. But, for me at least, the real howler is the ever tightening, huge, Topsy like volume of rules controlling, licenced, qualified pilots – it’s “for safety’s sake”, you understand.  Yet any bloody hoon can buy an Aldi special, fly the thing anywhere he likes, with not even a semblance of regulatory control, policing, skill test, knowledge test, medical or insurance. What a ducking farce.

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The star of the comedy is of course ‘the minister’ for transport who, on a daily basis, sits by the guillotine, chatting with friends and watching the wholesale decimation of an essential, once thriving industry.

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You must bear in mind that the Australian tax payer, pays this man (and many, many others) very well to ‘take care of business’. Such a sweet irony.

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At least the big insurers have their finger on the pulse and are reducing their exposure.

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Smart fellahin those ;and, they know all about qualifying and quantifying risk and how to mitigate it. I’d bet a beer, their legal eagles can spot the holes in the aviation law cheese and have moved to lessen the worry and exposure that causes.

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Of course they can’t do much about contaminated ground water or properties becoming almost worthless overnight – that, as they quite correctly point out, is a job for the government.

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This hot potato came through the front door and was whisked out of the back door, so fast, that only the faintest trace of the rank smell lingered in the corridors of power, to be denied, deflected, manipulated and buried with indecent haste at minimum cost and no ‘political’ damage.

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2017 is also shaping to be the year the MH 370 tombstone is finally erected; last respects paid and everyone back in the limo and off to lunch.


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Datuk Kok Soo Chon, the investigator-in-charge of the Malaysian ICAO Annex 13 MH370 (JIT) accident investigation.

By the end of this year, 370 will be a dim, distant memory to the majority – “Oh, was that the one disappeared all those years ago - more tea Vicar?– did they ever find it?

Aye well; no doubt a happy thought and a smile or two will turn up today; always does. So - happy new year to one and all.

{Whistles up dogs, ambles off into the beautiful dawn in the certain knowledge that the breeze, the river and the most excellent canine companionship will work their usual magic}.

Toot – toot.

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#17

SBG. Menu Jan 08_17.

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On the brunch menu for starters we have the ICAO lean compliance cuisine; which is an aerated confection, particularly good for those who want to make it look like they are tucking into a hearty meal, but are satisfied with a lot of hot air contained within a thin layer of waffle, sprinkled with low calorie fairy dust. This may been seen on the menu just below the Nigeria Envy main course; which is built on a solid platform of compliance meat and top marks vegetables.

The noisy buzzing of those intrusive drones keeps interrupting the ministerial spa sessions, but there is some good news. The minister, all by himself, read the Popular Mechanics article (big words and all) and discovered the solution to his discomfort may be found by banging the drones against the noses of low flying aircraft;

[Image: Boeing-737-700-collided-with-a-drone-on-...mbique.jpg] The damage stretches down the right-hand side of the fuselage (Photo: The Aviation Herald)

which immediately stops the done noise. This solution is at no cost to the government as the airliners must carry the cost of repair and he is rumoured to have shares in the local Radome repair station; so, it’s all win-win, for the minister.

P2 and GD teamed up to highlight some of benefits to being an Australian politician - HERE – saying that the stories in the media should be an inspiration to young folk; encouraging them to give up notions of being a Fireman or a Nurse, forget their corporate ambitions and the urge to be a nuclear physicist.

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The life long benefits of getting a seat in parliament are far and away the very best; minimum work, maximum money and best of all, no qualification required. Nope, just butter up the locals, make a few promises, make a few ‘friends’ get some snappy photo’s done up – and you're set for life.  

Last, but by no means least, the MH 370 tale of woe continues. The battle lines clearly drawn; those who believe that the aircraft must be found and those who don’t, for whatever their reasons, want it all to just go away.

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P2 has covered much of the weeks main items; there is a bit to plough through; but the ‘real’ story is the ICAO annexe 13 connection. I would get a coffee and start about HERE with Australia’s very own ATSB part of the tale.

Short blurb today, much to prepare as the world slowly shakes itself back to normal after the long break – if there ever was such a thing as normal.

Toot toot.
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#18

Sunday for some, Monday for others.

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What can I say – tempus and fugit collided.

It is certainly worth finding a mug of your favourite brew and five minutes to sit and read the FAA Safety Briefing from Susan Parson. It does not offer ‘perfect’ solutions; nor, (IMO) the answer to all questions; but, by Golly it makes a shed load of sense. In purely ‘academic’ debate between experienced ‘professional’ examiners of airmen there are some areas which could stand further amplification and discussion which could add value to the excellent briefing, but simply in the area of a really ‘in-depth’ improvement of the ‘thinking’ training of ‘examiners’, instructors and the like. That said, the briefing should be made a must read for all CASA officers. Once you have read the Parson’s offering and your coffee is cooling take time to compare the dribble pumped out, by the yard from CASA and comment on that from one experienced instructor.  Then have a wander through the unbelievable mess of the infamous Part 61. The question which needs an answer is simple enough – does Australia get value for money and improved safety from CASA? The answer is a resounding, crashing NO!

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The Drone wars saga continues to polarise the for and against camps, the erstwhile RRAT committee standing, once again, in the middle as referee, trying to strike a balance. It’s just as well the Senators can do this, as the interest level CASA have shown in taking any form of responsibility, control or offering of education, assistance to local councils is negligible to the point of negligence.  Civil Air, the air traffic controllers association have presented an excellent submission to the Senate committee which, in a subtle but strong message puts at least one area of CASA disinterest in clear focus. The local wits have created a scenario which puts a man on duty, in the control tower, glued to a pair of binoculars scanning the last three miles of final approach watching for drones and being responsible for separation. I’ll leave that to your imagination.

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Mind you, it is easy enough to see why CASA is such an expensive disaster area; political interest in anything in Australia seems to extend no further than ‘what’s in it for me’ (Senate committee excluded). It seems the only real crime is getting caught ‘at-it’, salvation depending on silence, ensuring that any form of ‘wide brush’ inquiry can be safely ruled out.

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Susan Ley the latest in a long line of them as wuz caught. I think I’d prefer a level playing field with open, honest ‘Baksheesh’ the general rule; at least then everyone gets ‘a taste’.


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The MH 370 story is not going quite according to the script; simply refusing to die and drift into legend.  The governments involved have the script, the power and the money to force an end to it all, relying on the public interest slowly, but certainty diminishing. Then, there are those who will not hear a bar of that song. Who knows how this will end; we shall see, but I find a smile in the coincidence that Trump signs in on the 20th as Fugro signs off on the search.

That’s my page done; time to hunt down a second coffee and sit still, just for a little while.
 
Toot toot.
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#19

The dark tale of Oedipus McCormick

Oedipus McCormick (Ancient Greek: Oidípous meaning "disjointed regulations") was a King of regulations and footstool to Meer'd'kay . A tragic hero in aviation mythology, Oedipus accidentally fulfilled a prophecy that he would end up killing his department while engaging in fits of anger and acts of bullying, thereby bringing disaster to Australian aviation.

The story of Oedipus is the subject of much discussion. He represents two enduring themes of mystique and myth: the flawed nature of the Regulators humanity and an individual's role in the course of destiny in a harsh industry.

In the most well-known version of the myth, Oedipus was born to Lai'Rudd and Albahnees. Albahnees wished to thwart a prophecy, so he left Oedipus to regulate in an ergonomically unsafe cubicle in Brisbane. However, he was later adopted by shepherds Abotty and Truss'bridge and raised by King Meer'd'kay and his boudoir of advisors and spin doctors as their own. Oedipus learned from the oracle at Infrastructure of the prophecy that he would end up killing the aviation industry and going back to his Star Chamber role, however unaware of his true parentage, believed he was fated to to shaft Quinn and Vaughan, so left for the shadowy, dark, cold Can'tberra. On his way he met an older man and quarrelled in a manner that he was famous for - yelling, screaming, cussing, veins popping out of his neck and his forehead pinched, and Oedipus McCormick killed the stranger only known as 'Dick'. Continuing on to Can'tberra, he found that the king of the city, Skidacioia, had been recently killed, and that the city was at the mercy of the Wingnut. Oedipus answered the monster's riddle correctly, defeating it and winning the throne of the dead King Skidacioia and the highly prized DAS role and assorted pot plants.

Years later, to end a plague on Aleckacia, Oedipus searched to find who had killed aviation off, and discovered that he himself was responsible. He then seized two pins from the landing gear of his beloved Yak and blinded himself with them.

The legend of Oedipus McCormick has been retold in many versions, and was used by Sigmund Dolan to name and give mythic precedent to the Oedipus complex, also known as 'ills of society'.

So the question regarding the legend of Oedipus McCormick is; myth, shanty, prophecy, or truth? May the discerning reader be the judge of that.

P7 - 'Bravo GD, bravo; choc frog voucher on 'the wires'.
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#20

One Sky; lots of chaff .

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I have to wonder, after reading Mitch Bingeman’s article, what planet the ‘Institute of Public Affairs’ (IPA) originate from.  I noticed the local footy team at training the other day, the dogs like the ‘boys’ and ambled over to say G’day – as is their wont. Stood in the shade I spied the club’s ‘drone operation swing into action.  They checked the thing, gave a little test flight then sent it up to 50 maybe 60 feet to record the plays and performance – for later. The operators were, I must say very good; one ‘flying’ and one watching as the wee drone faithfully followed the play. Bully, thought I and well done; how could anyone possibly object to such an operation, the thing behaved impeccably. The operators never once let the thing out of the confines of the park, just got their job done – no fuss, no threat, no stupidity; just a useful tools being used responsibly and sensibly. These folk are NOT the problem, they are to be encouraged.

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The IPA want to go ‘open slather’ – they have visions of drone pizza and parcel delivery creating new fortunes and employment, which is a grand dream: totally and completely absurd, but nonetheless, their ‘vision’.  What; 40 drones to replace the one man local parcel delivery service? Can’t happen. Not without guarantee of ‘air-worthiness’, not without an insurance and compensation system which must be ‘complex’ by nature; not without some method of guaranteed separation when saturation levels are reached; not without some tough ‘privacy’ laws; not without fail safe systems back up; not without anti-theft security and; most certainly, not without some serious public liability regulation. I reiterate; what ducking planet do these fantasy merchants come from – idiots.  

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Talking of drones; the latest from the king of drones on MH370 is difficult to swallow; mostly because it keeps wriggling around. The departments ‘responsible’ for the care and feeding of the miniscule must be breathing a sigh of relief and making votive offering to their gods of choice, giving thanks that ‘their’ manicured mouthpiece remembered all his lines and could always return to message; such is the brilliance of Chester. A ‘delight’ to work with, photogenic mouthpiece; mind you, some of the recent photo’s make the future minister for sport look a little ‘tail down’, coat not so shiny and the nose a tad dry.

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Oh dear; another day at the spa for our aging Lothario coming up – at public expense of course. FWIW – the latest nonsense on MH370 from the master of the TV makeup closet – HERE.

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The serious Statesmen who toil within various Senate committees are due to start work very soon. One of the ‘big-ticket’ items is the multi billion dollar One Sky program. The program being managed by ‘Air Services’ (ASA) demi-god Halfwit, catamite to his master ‘Whostoblame’. Between them, the audit team and the Senate they have backed the trough dwellers into a hellish tight corner. The ‘match-fit’ ASA crew will spin, dance and attempt to bluff their way out, but their untenable position is being undermined, aggravated further by the simple, natural progress of leading aviation nations to satellite based technology. Will there be some awkward questions for our hapless halfwit to bumble though? Bet the farm on it.



After some 30 odd years of whispering behind the throne and assisting in some of the most grandiose failures, leading from behind and generally keeping things ‘the way they are’ suddenly, we have ‘the Doc’ on video – twice. Why? We all wonder out loud. WTD is Aleck doing dragged into the spotlight and shoved on camera – not his style at all; passing strange. Well, there he is, for the world and it’s wife to see. Not that many could stomach watching the whole show; certainly no one who actually has any sort of dealings with ‘he-who-do-voodoo’.  In fact, many would cross the street to avoid, rather than shake the slippery hand which holds the throne.  Watch the video if you must, but only the brave or foolish will watch without a tin foil hat and large bucket.

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For all it’s been a quiet week, there is much to read and consider – if you’ve a mind to. But in essentials, nothing much has changed – there is a small victory in the AAT – which we most fervently hope signifies the end of the stranglehold CASA has had on that ‘boys club’. But then, we have been fooled before – many times and no one is holding their breath.

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The challenge for PAIN is to ensure that the Senate committee’s are as well advised as possible of the almost negative progress made toward reformation and the implementation of both Senate and ministerial directives to the essential services provided to the aviation industry. We may safely discount any strong ministerial input; it will be up to the Senate, supported by industry to put an end to the waste, the incompetence and the bastardry.

Aye, we all may dream a little; perhaps when the new DAS is installed – then, maybe matters aeronautical will improve. Then again – we may get DDDD_NFI’s advisor appointed to the role; now wouldn’t that be just dandy.

Toot toot.
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