Tick, flick and publish.
#1

After reading through the appalling non article by the Tom Cruise look-a-like 'writer' - Lisa Allen - we thought it was worth a thread.

Enjoy...... Big Grin

Too toot. 
Reply
#2

(12-15-2015, 08:07 AM)kharon Wrote:  After reading through the appalling non article by the Tom Cruise look-a-like 'writer' - Lisa Allen - we thought it was worth a thread.

Enjoy...... Big Grin

Too toot. 

A very young Tom Cruise maybe... Big Grin :
Quote:Qantas cancels flight from Sydney on A330 due to hydraulics issue

  • Lisa Allen
  • The Australian
  • December 13, 2015 4:37PM
[Image: lisa_allen.png]
Property & tourism reporter
Sydney


Qantas was forced to cancel a flight late today after the failure of one of its A330s about to take off on the busy Sydney to Melbourne route.

The hydraulics system of the Airbus, which was carrying 250 passengers, failed as the aircraft was taxing to the runway, leading the pilots to shut down the European-manufactured aircraft.

A passenger aboard QF435 said the plane came to a very sudden halt due to “a major hydraulic system failure”. The plane was shut down and towed back to the gate.
“Qantas flight 435 returned to the terminal shortly after pushing back from the gate due to a hydraulics issue,” a Qantas spokesman told The Australian today.

“As is standard procedure, the pilots powered down the aircraft and it was towed to the terminal.

“The aircraft had just begun taxiing and was not on the runway.

“The flight was cancelled and passengers have been accommodated on other services. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.”

On Friday, a Jetstar plane from Adelaide to Bali was forced to turn back after an hour due to an issue with its hydraulic system. Flight JQ127 departed Adelaide Airport about 7pm on Friday but turned back about an hour into the flight because of an issue with one of its three hydraulic systems.

It landed safely back in Adelaide at 9.30pm.

A Jetstar spokesman told AAP the aircraft could have safely flown to Bali, however the decision to turn back and have it serviced in Adelaide was due to the “greater engineering support we have in Australia”.

If Lisa was (according to Dougy) one of the front-runners for the Oz Aviation Editor job, I don't believe that absolute bollocks effort will do her any favours.

For mine the best bit of that whole rubbish piece were some of the derogatory comments.. Wink :

Quote:John


2 days ago

Your headline is hysterical . An aborted take off is where the pilot chooses to abandon a take off  procedure in the roll down the run way prior to rotation, due to technical, human or a weather incidents. In this case, a fault is identified whilst taxing to the runway, and the pilot made the decision to abandon the flight. Zero safety issue... good flight and operation decision.

Pantera

2 days ago

@John What an atrocious article. Aviation experts with skills in Journalism are fairly plentiful and easy to come by. There is no need for a 'Property and Tourism' reporter to be writing rubbish articles like this. 

Quote:Adam


2 days ago

Breaking news: the Central to Cronulla bus has broken down.  Passengers forced to wait.

Quote:Ted


2 days ago

Qantas takeoff aborted and airbus pulled of the runway?

Peelease, what rubbish without a thread of truth to it.

The Australian is sinking to a new low.

No takeoff was " aborted", no aircraft pulled of the runway.instead we have a standard operating procedure shutting down an aircraft on the tarmac and return to the gate.
Absolutely no story here, no danger, no drama no nothing!

QOTW nominee.. Rolleyes
Quote:Mark

2 days ago

I pulled into a Shell service station today because my American made Jeep Cherokee which is 7 months old had a tyre which according to the automatics on board, was a few psi less than the three others.

Should this have been an article in today's Australian?
No?

No more than this story should have been.

Let me tell you the damage crap like this does do. It means that sometimes on the flight deck, for a split second I think about what will this return to gate do media wise. It is a split second but it is a split second that I should be thinking about other things.

Take this non story down.

Quote:Susan

2 days ago

The headline on the home page says "Qantas aborted takeoff".   When you click on the article the title says "Qantas cancels flight from Sydney on A330 due to hydraulics issue".
Mr Editor, this is pathetic "journalism" and should not have been published.   A system malfunction on taxi, which was dealt with, is not worthy of reporting.

System malfunctions occur all the time in airline operations and are dealt with using the appropriate Non-Normal checklist.

An aborted take-off is also a non-event.

We expect far better from The Australian.

Quote:Michael

1 day ago

how is this news??? what a joke - and I pay a subscription for this junk.

Just had a thought??- Maybe poor Lisa doesn't want the gig and this his her way of ensuring she doesn't get it - MTF P2 Tongue  
Reply
#3

Does Lisa sing Old Time Rock'n'Roll in her white socks? Or does that go against the rules of Scientology?
Reply
#4

Opposite side of the coin.

As a recent example of good, effective & well researched aviation/airline travel media stories you can't go past the following from Alastair Long Wink , courtesy of Airline Reporter

Quote:Unruly Airline Passengers: Nuts & Basic Bitches

By Alastair Long
18 Dec2015
[Image: 15350076054_33db38d99f_h-754x503.jpg]
34R, in Doha – ready for takeoff and hopefully a peaceful flight

In my professional capacity, I recently gave a presentation to a group of stakeholders in the travel industry about the law on unruly and disruptive airline passengers. I took a gamble on introducing the subject under the strap line “nuts and basic bitches” to several bemused faces in the audience, who naturally wondered where this was going, and what the link to disruptive passengers would be. The gamble seemed to pay off, as I talked them through two high-profile incidences of allegedly unruly passengers which were widely reported in the media. I wanted to take a deeper look at recent incidents and also explore some of the rules and regulations surrounding mid-air incidents.

The first one involved the former Korean Air executive, Ms. Cho Hyun-ah, who forced a Korean Air flight bound for Seoul in December 2014 to cease taxiing and return to the gate at New York’s JFK airport to have a member of the first class cabin crew ejected. It is alleged that the crew member served Ms. Cho macadamia nuts in the bag and not on a plate. Dubbed “nut rage”, the furious Ms. Cho took umbrage with the hapless flight attendant and allegedly forced him to kneel in apology, before throwing him off the parked aircraft. It then pushed back again and continued its journey on to Seoul.

It caused considerable scandal in South Korea, and led to Ms. Cho being fired, arrested, and briefly imprisoned. I would say she paid a stiff consequence, but not everyone does.

[Image: A320_Door_2L-c-Christopher-Doyle-566x754.jpg]
Bit of fresh air mid-flight? Think again. – Photo: Christopher Doyle | FlickrCC

The second incident occurred in June of this year when London Luton Airport’s Transport Police met supermodel Kate Moss at the aircraft door as a result of alleged disruptive behavior whilst on board an easyJet flight from Bodrum, Turkey. She’d apparently been drinking her duty-free vodka and was heard calling the pilot a “basic bitch” as she disembarked. In subsequent articles, some of the passengers who witnessed the event said that the cabin crew had acted disproportionately and that Ms. Moss had not been acting aggressively or in a way that might have endangered the aircraft. The transport “boys in blue” made no arrests. Perhaps a storm in a teacup.

More recently, a drunken passenger attempted to open an aircraft door mid-air (not that she would have been even remotely successful in a pressurized cabin) on a British Airways flight to Boston, and in yet another incident, Jasbir Singh Bharaj was given an 11-month prison sentence after being convicted of violent behavior and indecency on an Emirates flight from Dubai to the UK last September.

These incidents usually make brief headlines and can elicit reactions, ranging from mild amusement to indignation and outright fear. As AvGeeks, our joy of flying could quickly unravel when the angry passenger sitting in seat 3B decides to kick off and hurl abuse (or worse), ruining the entire flight for other passengers and the crew. The curious fascination with watching one booze-fueled person (I’m staying gender-neutral here) take a swing at an equally inebriated other in a bar isn’t as fascinating inside a narrow-body at 35,000ft. It’s quite literally in your face and can be very alarming.

[Image: DSC_0803-754x501.jpg]
SkyBar and Nightclub…bottoms up? Er, no thanks – Photo: Alastair Long | AirlineReporter

The aviation industry is paying attention to this ever-growing problem. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has been very vocal about the impact that unruly and disruptive passengers have to its member airlines. Between 2007 and 2013, it estimated that there were more than 28,400 unruly passenger incidences, 20% of which required police and/or security service intervention. That works out at an average of 13 incidences a day over the six-year period, and those are just the ones that have been reported. Furthermore, not many of them lead to prosecution or punishment.

[Image: 863763645_fb40da4774_o-754x504.jpg]
This is (macadamia) nuts! – Photo: Tatters | FlickrCC

So what is the law on this? Well, certainly the pilots amongst you AvGeeks will know this better than me, and may  have even relied on it. The 1963 Tokyo Convention on Offenses and Certain Other Acts Committed On Board Aircraft came into force in 1969 and has been ratified by 186 countries. Article 6 gives the captain the power to take reasonable measures, including restraint, against a person who he reasonably believes has committed or is about commit an offense on board in order to protect the safety of the aircraft and all those on board.

Article 10 gives the captain, and those involved in dealing with an unruly passenger, immunity from liability as a result of any legal proceedings. That seems pretty cut and dry. Why do so many incidences of “air rage” therefore go unpunished? Well, despite the virtual omnipresence of the Convention, which has faithfully served its purpose for the past 50 years, there are some technical legal lacunae, which have created a few critical loopholes.

[Image: 7319053506_563bda24a0_h-754x503.jpg]
Flying over Frankfurt – hoping for a calm flight

Firstly, under Article 3 of the Convention, “the State of registration of the aircraft is competent to exercise jurisdiction over offences and acts committed on board.” The practical reality is that the aftermath of such an event is likely to be the flight destination, but the Convention doesn’t grant the destination country jurisdiction. Will the local police arrest and charge the passenger under the penal laws of the country where the aircraft is registered? Well, no. It’s going to be the international diplomatic equivalent of saying “not my issue, guvnor.” The passenger walks away.

Secondly, under Article 9 of the Convention “the aircraft commander may deliver to the competent authorities of any Contracting State in the territory of which the aircraft lands any person who he has reasonable grounds to believe has committed on board the aircraft an act which, in his opinion, is a serious offense according to the penal law of the State of registration of the aircraft.”

[Image: 19191640871_5286451204_h-754x503.jpg]
Waiting to board — hopefully to have a peaceful flight

That’s legal speak for saying that the captain can hand over the unruly passenger to local police because he or she has broken the law of the country where the aircraft is registered. Again, the arrest will be made thousands of miles away in the country where the aircraft has just landed (possibly as a divert). The main problem is that the local police will obviously follow, and be subject to, their own local criminal code.

What if the passenger’s conduct hasn’t technically broken any local law or under that law no “serious offense” has actually been committed? The passenger potentially walks away. Interestingly, the Court of Appeal in South Korea found that Ms. Cho had not violated aviation safety laws because her tantrum had not resulted in the aircraft being forced to change routes (it hadn’t yet taken off). That, and her genuine remorse, seems to have been enough for the judge to suspend her sentence, in mitigation.

As I said, the industry has taken action. In April 2014, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) published the Montreal Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Civil Aviation (aka Montreal Convention). This convention amends the Tokyo Convention, extending jurisdiction to the State of landing (i.e. the destination country) and removing the reference to the penal law of the country where the aircraft is registered when determining whether a “serious offense” has been committed (although for reasons of proportionality and legal certainty, authorities in the State of landing shall consider whether the offense is also an offense in the State of the registration/operator).

The Montreal Convention has not yet been ratified in order to bring it into law. IATA has issued a general plea to all signatory countries to sign it and adopt and/or amend their national law. It is hoped that this will empower local police to take action, creating consistency and a global benchmark of zero tolerance for bad behavior when in flight. In fact, some countries, such as the US, the UK, Australia, Canada, and France already have laws in place to deal with unruly passengers who arrive in their territories.

[Image: 8575370778_4210f41f68_k-754x503.jpg]
A few drinks…sure. A whole bottle (or two)? Uh… no please – Photo: David Parker Brown | AirlineReporter

I’ve alluded to alcohol being the root cause of many of these incidents. That seems to be the general consensus too, particularly in respect of getting drunk on your carry-ons purchased at the duty free shop in the departure lounge. British airline Jet2 and World Duty Free are exploring the possibilities for selling duty free in tamper-proof bags as part of the airline’s commendable “Onboard Together” campaign to raise awareness and tackle antisocial behavior on flights.

Without wishing to sound overly preachy or judgemental, us AvGeeks love aviation and want others to do so too. Whether we experience the joy, thrill, and excitement of each flight or are simply trying to get from A to B as smoothly as possible, none of us wants that spoiled by a small but unruly minority. The airlines also don’t want the expense of dumping tonnes of fuel, not to mention other costs, diverting the flight because of that angry passenger.
   
MTF..P2 Tongue
Reply
#5

Ben Sandilands – (legend) Plane Talking @ Crikey. – HERE -

In a nutshell – the total interest of the media in aviation; barring the major prangs which they never seem to tire of.  Helping to prevent one? Nah, that would be counterproductive.   What a sad cynical, self obsessed world they live in.


Quote:There is a real question of management courage and editorial judgement involved in the publishing of self indulgent indignation about how a journalist is treated on a flight, and ignoring the on going crisis in air safety regulatory oversight in this country and the operational competence, at a very fundamental level, of the large domestic airline that Jetstar has become.
Reply
#6

Ben Sandilands - Continuing the theme of aviation stories, that are not stories at all.. Dodgy

Quote:Malaysia Airlines didn’t fly wrong way for 8 minutes out of Auckland

Ben Sandilands | Dec 29, 2015 10:09AM |
[Image: malaysia_a333_9m-mtg_tasman_sea_151225_map-610x381.jpg]
Aviation Herald’s comparative diagram of AKL-KL routes

For an example of hysterics in the click bait media, the persistent reports that a Malaysia Airlines jet flew in the opposite direction to that intended for a full eight minutes on its way from Auckland to Kuala Lumpur is hard to pass up.

There remain a few grey areas in the explanations so far forthcoming, but this was a minor incident, to MH132, on 25 December 2015, that had nothing to do with the appalling loss of life on MH370 (239 on board) on 8 March 2014, nor the shoot down of MH17 (298 dead) on 17 July 2014.

The diagram on top of page from Aviation Herald and its report on this incident is the key to understanding what happened, and makes the media reports that continued to be posted in their original, inaccurate, and frankly ridiculous forms on the internet an embarrassment to those that care about accurate journalism.

What we know is that because of adverse forecast headwinds forecast for cruising altitudes over the tropical north of Australia flight planning at Malaysia Airlines chose to use an often used but more southerly track across the great southern land to get to KL.
There seems to have been an earlier flight plan using the more frequently used northerly route.

On departure from Auckland MH132 was given instructions by the tower to take them away from the normal traffic that it has to manage for multiple arrivals and departures prior to picking up its filed flight plan.  Such instructions by busy airport towers are about getting a flight away from an airport, influenced not just by traffic but the prevailing winds on the airfield and the runway being used.

Eight minutes seems like a perfectly reasonable period of time in which to achieve this, whereupon the pilots of MH132 were clearly surprised by being given a heading which wasn’t what they expected from their filed flight plan.

What is unclear is whether or not the pilots had studied the latest and correct plan, or an outdated plan. The Aviation Herald report infers that they had expected to fly the northerly route, while the tower directed them on a heading consistent with the newer more southerly route, which was then flown to KL once that confusion was resolved.

However there are aspects of this incident that remain undetermined, and incident investigations often produce surprise findings based on additional information.

Finding out whether the tower was using the right flight plan, and MH132 the wrong one, is important. What went wrong where? MH132 is shown as having flown the southernmost route, but could have flown either without any issues.

It would be interesting to know if Australian ATC was expecting to see MH132 follow the northerly or southerly option, and if it had received only one version of the flight plan.
Stories about how the jet was flying due south toward its possible demise in the southern ocean,  or those that made gratuitous constructs seeking to link this incident to possible explanations for the disappearance of MH370 were a load of crap. How much of that crap was invented by the authors of those reports is something a serious news organisation ought to investigate.
  
Some of the comments are worth regurgitating, first Geoff explains very well how these sort of mistakes can happen and why this incident was a serious non-story.. Wink
Quote:4
[Image: b94198ebdfc363dcd6253ad866184453?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Geoff
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

Ben – the flight data computers on both sides of the Tasman are just machines, they serve up whatever was sent them. NZ ATC obviously sees this southern route all the time so it was quite logical to them. The airways clearance should have contained the first point en-route as well as the SID so I can only assume the crew missed that cue.

On the Australian side the flight plan would be stored and is not a concern to controllers until coordination is received from the Kiwi side. This is due to the fact that a flight plan is modified as the flight continues. The receiving controller wants to know what the aircraft is actually doing as opposed to what the dispatcher put in the system six hours ago.

Naturally it is far more complicated than that however in simple terms the answer to your question is that the Australian flight plan would be Malaysian’s last filed plan just as it was be in NZ. Why that and the plan loaded in the aircraft were different is what an investigation will discover

And then the pack piles in - stacks on the mill  Confused :

Quote:5
[Image: c73957db1e9cfcaadb4a4d6bc11c9dc9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Dan Dair
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:22 pm | Permalink
“a serious news organisation”

Are there many of them still about.?

IMO the ‘race-to-the-bottom’ in ‘news’ reporting & sensationalising everything they happen to have a news camera in-place for, began with CNN & 24 hour news channels.
In the old days, news was a pretty-well researched process……

It seems to progressively have more & more factual & grammar errors.?

Maybe grammar isn’t regarded as important anymore,
but you’d imagine facts still would be.?

6
[Image: fcd14d3170b34c7335126cd112204cf9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Ben Sandilands
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

Dan,
Grandma and auto complete atrocities, as well as my own errors in spelling and usage, are of constant concern. I don’t ever post anything that isn’t flawed by an error that a sub-editor wold have caught, and have just cleaned up some really poor wording on my part in this post.

To that extent, I’m in a glass house hurling rocks, but I agree with you, and cringe at, the other issues of accuracy and context that stories like this one raise. Which on a different level led to the earlier post about Fairfax making the non-upgrade of a reporter into ‘news’, while ignoring the real news.

7
[Image: 65ad535bdcef03c80a8b7ec1e6294cb9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] kiwikurt
Posted December 29, 2015 at 7:19 pm | Permalink

And we can now add a story about the entitled Russell Crowe firing an angry tweet at Virgin Australia because he hadn’t seen the fairly widespread news regarding the carriage of hoverboards. Unsurprisingly little journalism in that story.

Given the rubbish state of media perhaps you can forgive him for not keeping up with current events.

I’m likewise grateful Ben has reported on what the old media sensationally reported. I think a factor could also be that the A330 has only started operating AKL from September, taking over from the 777. So it’s highly likley that a lot of crews are operating this route for the first time. Route guides, Sim profiles etc. aside nothing beats doing it for real.

That said I’m guilty of having suffered confirmation bias and loaded the wrong flight plan once despite the correct route being listed on the paperwork. My brain was working on an old schedule and ignoring what the paperwork was telling me.

8
[Image: da4ab3e4f659776b7d59c95fa8564f34?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] 777 Steve
Posted December 29, 2015 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

Total non-story, it happens all the time. “Big airways 123, cleared direct xxxx”

“Ahhh centre, that’s not on our flight plan”

“Ok big airways 123, let me just check”

30 seconds later………

“Big airways 123, it seems there is a duplicate plan in the system, cleared direct zzzz”
And that Ben is how it happens, even in congested airspace, of which the Tasman or Oz is not. More poor reporting, what a shame that being a reporter used to be considered a job that was beacon of accuracy and integrity.

9
[Image: 21b60ac190c348d8e493a7713f62753a?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] comet
Posted December 29, 2015 at 10:22 pm | Permalink

If news organisations don’t have accuracy and integrity, then what do they have?
You may as well get your news from Twitter and social media, which is what most people do these days anyway.

In fact, most news organisations get their news from Twitter and social media.

10
[Image: c6f77856998c94d3c81343ea601c62c1?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Tango
Posted December 30, 2015 at 8:42 am | Permalink
The version I read had htem flying Norhtr instead of West.

Looking at a Map (not on my radar normally) of NZ, Oz and Malaysia it was obvious that N.W. or West was more normal route regardless of great circle routes.

I didn’t see the one going South into never never land.

Significant issue of confusion and hopefully on radar at all times so they knew where it was at.

Should be a very interesting incident report (and good news that’s all it was). Planes not being where they are supposed to for one side or the other is defenitley a bad thing.

11
[Image: 20790460aa939156fe5b2a1aa91d451f?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] sang froid
Posted December 30, 2015 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

Is it just festive season when the kids take over editorial oversight? Another instance you report on elsewhere (‘celebrity’ demands). Today, because the nutter Abetz calls for Abbott to return to Cabinet – the media makes this a mass movement. Heavens help us.
Luv it Big Grin
MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#7

(12-30-2015, 08:22 PM)Peetwo Wrote:  Ben Sandilands - Continuing the theme of aviation stories, that are not stories at all.. Dodgy




Quote:Malaysia Airlines didn’t fly wrong way for 8 minutes out of Auckland

Ben Sandilands | Dec 29, 2015 10:09AM |
[Image: malaysia_a333_9m-mtg_tasman_sea_151225_map-610x381.jpg]
Aviation Herald’s comparative diagram of AKL-KL routes

For an example of hysterics in the click bait media, the persistent reports that a Malaysia Airlines jet flew in the opposite direction to that intended for a full eight minutes on its way from Auckland to Kuala Lumpur is hard to pass up.

There remain a few grey areas in the explanations so far forthcoming, but this was a minor incident, to MH132, on 25 December 2015, that had nothing to do with the appalling loss of life on MH370 (239 on board) on 8 March 2014, nor the shoot down of MH17 (298 dead) on 17 July 2014.

The diagram on top of page from Aviation Herald and its report on this incident is the key to understanding what happened, and makes the media reports that continued to be posted in their original, inaccurate, and frankly ridiculous forms on the internet an embarrassment to those that care about accurate journalism.

What we know is that because of adverse forecast headwinds forecast for cruising altitudes over the tropical north of Australia flight planning at Malaysia Airlines chose to use an often used but more southerly track across the great southern land to get to KL.
There seems to have been an earlier flight plan using the more frequently used northerly route.

On departure from Auckland MH132 was given instructions by the tower to take them away from the normal traffic that it has to manage for multiple arrivals and departures prior to picking up its filed flight plan.  Such instructions by busy airport towers are about getting a flight away from an airport, influenced not just by traffic but the prevailing winds on the airfield and the runway being used.

Eight minutes seems like a perfectly reasonable period of time in which to achieve this, whereupon the pilots of MH132 were clearly surprised by being given a heading which wasn’t what they expected from their filed flight plan.

What is unclear is whether or not the pilots had studied the latest and correct plan, or an outdated plan. The Aviation Herald report infers that they had expected to fly the northerly route, while the tower directed them on a heading consistent with the newer more southerly route, which was then flown to KL once that confusion was resolved.

However there are aspects of this incident that remain undetermined, and incident investigations often produce surprise findings based on additional information.

Finding out whether the tower was using the right flight plan, and MH132 the wrong one, is important. What went wrong where? MH132 is shown as having flown the southernmost route, but could have flown either without any issues.

It would be interesting to know if Australian ATC was expecting to see MH132 follow the northerly or southerly option, and if it had received only one version of the flight plan.
Stories about how the jet was flying due south toward its possible demise in the southern ocean,  or those that made gratuitous constructs seeking to link this incident to possible explanations for the disappearance of MH370 were a load of crap. How much of that crap was invented by the authors of those reports is something a serious news organisation ought to investigate.
  
Some of the comments are worth regurgitating, first Geoff explains very well how these sort of mistakes can happen and why this incident was a serious non-story.. Wink



Quote:4
[Image: b94198ebdfc363dcd6253ad866184453?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Geoff
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

Ben – the flight data computers on both sides of the Tasman are just machines, they serve up whatever was sent them. NZ ATC obviously sees this southern route all the time so it was quite logical to them. The airways clearance should have contained the first point en-route as well as the SID so I can only assume the crew missed that cue.

On the Australian side the flight plan would be stored and is not a concern to controllers until coordination is received from the Kiwi side. This is due to the fact that a flight plan is modified as the flight continues. The receiving controller wants to know what the aircraft is actually doing as opposed to what the dispatcher put in the system six hours ago.

Naturally it is far more complicated than that however in simple terms the answer to your question is that the Australian flight plan would be Malaysian’s last filed plan just as it was be in NZ. Why that and the plan loaded in the aircraft were different is what an investigation will discover

And then the pack piles in - stacks on the mill  Confused :




Quote:5
[Image: c73957db1e9cfcaadb4a4d6bc11c9dc9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Dan Dair
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:22 pm | Permalink
“a serious news organisation”

Are there many of them still about.?

IMO the ‘race-to-the-bottom’ in ‘news’ reporting & sensationalising everything they happen to have a news camera in-place for, began with CNN & 24 hour news channels.
In the old days, news was a pretty-well researched process……

It seems to progressively have more & more factual & grammar errors.?

Maybe grammar isn’t regarded as important anymore,
but you’d imagine facts still would be.?

6
[Image: fcd14d3170b34c7335126cd112204cf9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Ben Sandilands
Posted December 29, 2015 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

Dan,
Grandma and auto complete atrocities, as well as my own errors in spelling and usage, are of constant concern. I don’t ever post anything that isn’t flawed by an error that a sub-editor wold have caught, and have just cleaned up some really poor wording on my part in this post.

To that extent, I’m in a glass house hurling rocks, but I agree with you, and cringe at, the other issues of accuracy and context that stories like this one raise. Which on a different level led to the earlier post about Fairfax making the non-upgrade of a reporter into ‘news’, while ignoring the real news.

7
[Image: 65ad535bdcef03c80a8b7ec1e6294cb9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] kiwikurt
Posted December 29, 2015 at 7:19 pm | Permalink

And we can now add a story about the entitled Russell Crowe firing an angry tweet at Virgin Australia because he hadn’t seen the fairly widespread news regarding the carriage of hoverboards. Unsurprisingly little journalism in that story.

Given the rubbish state of media perhaps you can forgive him for not keeping up with current events.

I’m likewise grateful Ben has reported on what the old media sensationally reported. I think a factor could also be that the A330 has only started operating AKL from September, taking over from the 777. So it’s highly likley that a lot of crews are operating this route for the first time. Route guides, Sim profiles etc. aside nothing beats doing it for real.

That said I’m guilty of having suffered confirmation bias and loaded the wrong flight plan once despite the correct route being listed on the paperwork. My brain was working on an old schedule and ignoring what the paperwork was telling me.

8
[Image: da4ab3e4f659776b7d59c95fa8564f34?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] 777 Steve
Posted December 29, 2015 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

Total non-story, it happens all the time. “Big airways 123, cleared direct xxxx”

“Ahhh centre, that’s not on our flight plan”

“Ok big airways 123, let me just check”

30 seconds later………

“Big airways 123, it seems there is a duplicate plan in the system, cleared direct zzzz”
And that Ben is how it happens, even in congested airspace, of which the Tasman or Oz is not. More poor reporting, what a shame that being a reporter used to be considered a job that was beacon of accuracy and integrity.

9
[Image: 21b60ac190c348d8e493a7713f62753a?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] comet
Posted December 29, 2015 at 10:22 pm | Permalink

If news organisations don’t have accuracy and integrity, then what do they have?
You may as well get your news from Twitter and social media, which is what most people do these days anyway.

In fact, most news organisations get their news from Twitter and social media.

10
[Image: c6f77856998c94d3c81343ea601c62c1?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Tango
Posted December 30, 2015 at 8:42 am | Permalink
The version I read had htem flying Norhtr instead of West.

Looking at a Map (not on my radar normally) of NZ, Oz and Malaysia it was obvious that N.W. or West was more normal route regardless of great circle routes.

I didn’t see the one going South into never never land.

Significant issue of confusion and hopefully on radar at all times so they knew where it was at.

Should be a very interesting incident report (and good news that’s all it was). Planes not being where they are supposed to for one side or the other is defenitley a bad thing.

11
[Image: 20790460aa939156fe5b2a1aa91d451f?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] sang froid
Posted December 30, 2015 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

Is it just festive season when the kids take over editorial oversight? Another instance you report on elsewhere (‘celebrity’ demands). Today, because the nutter Abetz calls for Abbott to return to Cabinet – the media makes this a mass movement. Heavens help us.
Luv it Big Grin

This was the Russell Crowe non-story:

Quote:Russell Crowe slams Virgin Australia for hoverboard ban


  • Gina Rushton
  • The Australian
  • December 30, 2015 12:00AM
[Image: gina_rushton.png]
Journalist
Sydney
Gina Rushton is a Journalist at The Australian. She has previously worked as a publicist and media assistant.

[Image: d636cf570b439c87e13c4ec4399aba14?width=650]Russell Crowe’s tweet.

Russell Crowe has vowed “never again” to fly with Virgin Australia after the actor and his children were kicked off a flight for trying to bring hoverboards in their carry-on bags.

“No Segway boards as luggage? Too late to tell us at ­airport. Kids and I offloaded. Goodbye Virgin. Never again,” Crowe tweeted yesterday, calling the airline “ridiculous”.

An hour later, having rec­eived no response from the airline, he tweeted: “I’m awaiting your reply; where is your duty of responsibility in this? Why not tell me when I am booking my ticket?”

The Virgin Australia Twitter account responded by reminding Crowe that hoverboards had been banned on most airlines and this was outlined in emails he would have received.

“We have communi­cated this on Facebook and Twitter, as well as through the media,”

Virgin Australia tweeted. “We understand your frustration, however, please appreciate that safety is our No 1 priority.”

Other airlines, including Emirates and Qantas, have publicly announced a blanket ban on hoverboards as carry-on or checked luggage.

It isn’t the first time Crowe has taken to Twitter to air grievances with a Virgin-branded company. In 2012, when he was shooting Les Miserables in Britain, he was invited to check out facilities at the Virgin Active’s Royal Berkshire Health & Racquets Club in Bracknell, Eng­land, but he was refused entry for not being a member.

In a series of tweets he called the staff “Hoity-toity’’ and urged owner Richard Branson to “have fit/smart folk rep your brand’’.

High-profile Sydney lawyer Chris Murphy thanked Crowe for raising awareness about the hoverboards. “We had our one, a Christmas present, packed to go away on holidays,” he tweeted.

Other Twitter users were less grateful. Comedian Joel Creasey tweeted: “You’re a millionaire, babe. Get some perspective.”

Crowe responded: “I’m a fath­er, Joel, with two kids at an airport, trying to start our holiday

Come on Gina you can do better than this.. Dodgy

Still don't think you can go past the SMH story (dubbed 'Simply Marvellous Horse-Pooh' by "K" Big Grin ) for the ultimate 'bollocks' Aviation news story.. Smile

Quote:The world's biggest mystery is in Martin Dolan's sights


Date November 22, 2014
Melanie Kembrey
 

[Image: 1416576716558.jpg] A life of public service: Martin Dolan. Photo: Andrew Meares

Martin Dolan is a faceless aviation bureaucrat, until something big happens. 


Quote:Bearing in mind this is a huge tragedy, it's also a mystery and we really do want to find the answer. 
The 57-year-old is helping solve what remains the greatest aviation mystery of all time: the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

As head of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, he is leading the search for the jet, concentrated deep in the southern Indian Ocean off the coast of Perth.
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Even out of the global media's glare, Dolan has to endure people asking him at dinner parties if he has found the plane.

"Sometimes I'm tempted to say 'oh yes, we've found it we're just not telling you'," he says.

He quickly clarifies that he's joking. Since the disappearance, conspiracy theorists have been busy trying to solve the mystery themselves. Many have contacted Dolan.

"It's because you've got this big mystery and everyone wants to know the answer and everyone wants to help. It's unhelpful, for the sake of the families more than anything else, in the sense that it has the potential to undermine confidence in what we are doing," he says. 

The Boeing 777 vanished with 239 people on board en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March. There has been no sign of it since.

We meet for lunch at Mezzalira, a swanky Italian restaurant just a few blocks from Dolan's office in central Canberra.

As we sit at a corner table by the window, Dolan knows he could receive a phone call at any moment telling him that the plane has been found. He also knows the weight of his waiting is nothing compared to what the families of those on board MH370 are experiencing.

Ships are scouring a search zone of up to 60,000 square kilometres where the plane is thought to have run out of fuel and plummeted into the ocean after travelling for several hours on auto-pilot. 

"It's always in the back of my head, the idea that the phone could ring at any time," Dolan, whose face and hands come alive with expression when he makes a point, says.

"So while we are at the sharp end of a big exercise and there are huge expectations, we've got a whole lot of capability behind us."

Before we open our menus, Dolan informs me that he will be paying the bill because public servants must make official declarations for gifts over a certain amount. He opts for the spaghetti alla carbonara and I choose the tortellini di zucca.

Commitment to the public service has been a consistent feature of his life – and has led him to what could now prove to be the greatest challenge of his career.
 
The son of a mediaeval historian and an archaeologist who were both university lecturers, Dolan was born in Scotland but grew up in Armidale in north-western NSW.

The second of five children, he spent most evenings after school playing in paddocks and creeks at the edge of the town.

At the nearby University of New England, where both his parents worked, he studied arts and teaching.

"I had a moment of revelation in front of a high school English class in Coffs Harbour as I did practice teaching. I looked at them, they looked at me and we realised this was never going to work," Dolan says.

Engaged to be married and in need of a steady job, Dolan landed a coveted graduate position managing aid projects for the Australian Development Assistance Bureau, which was later renamed AusAid.

He admits he wasn't passionate about it. To the chagrin of the 14 other graduates who were desperate for the position, he had to ask what the bureau did when he was invited to join it. 

Four years into the role, Dolan was posted to Dhaka in Bangladesh, where he had his first insight into the world of aviation. He took his wife Cynthia, now a primary school deputy principal, and two children Fiona and Peter, along with him.

Once there, he helped train aircraft maintenance engineers, facilitating learning trips for them to Sydney. 

The position marked the start of 35 years in the Commonwealth public service, in which he has added various corporate management roles, including chief executive of Comcare and Chief Finance Officer in the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.

Dolan says Comcare, where he analysed how to boost workplace safety, further prepared him for his current job, where he must make recommendations following transport accidents. 

"I used to mentor graduates in my term, and they would say 'tell me, oh wise one how do I manage a career in the public service?' and I would say I really don't know. Stuff comes up, you take your opportunities if you can and it's surprising how often it's a really interesting job."

Dolan has also learnt the secret power of being a generalist, rather than a specialist.
He says the most useful ability he has developed is how to process and absorb information quickly, a skill he thinks starts with an arts degree. 

It was when two planes crashed into the World Trade Centre on September 11, 2001, that Dolan had his real "baptism of fire". He was put in charge of Australia's aviation and airports, with his first task to ramp up security. He had to a build a system that was terrorism-proof, negotiating with the major players like airlines, airports and flight companies to implement tighter security measures. 

"It was a high-pressure job because obviously the expectation was that nothing should go wrong and we had to make sure as best as we could that was the case, but there was always the possibility," Dolan says.
 
He says the intensity of the job – not knowing what's around the corner but at the same time having to prepare for it – makes it the one most comparable to his current position.
 
He took on the role of first ever chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, an independent government body charged with investigating transport safety, in 2009.

"Sometimes narratives aren't clear until you look back on things," Dolan says.

"And I can see that a lot of what I had been doing over all that time has sort of all come together. This is the job that has brought it all together."

When Dolan woke eight months ago to the news that a Malaysia Airlines jet had gone missing, he had no idea of the key role he would soon play. 

It was only after the search shifted to Australia's coast and hopes of finding passengers alive faded, that the unprecedented search and recovery mission landed wholly in his lap.

Now Dolan is co-ordinating a team of investigators, whom he is quick to praise, in a search for the aircraft  kilometres beneath the ocean's surface.

The key to the mystery is the flight data recorder, which stores a log of electronic systems on the plane. It will take the ships one year to scour the long and narrow arc where the plane last communicated with a ground station through satellite.

Yet even if, as he chews his last bite of spaghetti, Dolan were to receive the call that wreckage had been found , his job would be far from complete. The Malaysian government has agreed that the best place to download the data would be in Canberra.

Dolan was at the helm of the bureau when it investigated the mid-air explosion on Qantas flight 32, which suffered catastrophic engine failure shortly after it took off from Singapore's Changi Airport in 2010. 

He also oversaw the investigation into the ditching of a Pel-Air ambulance plane off Norfolk Island in 2009. Amazingly, all six people on board survived the crash.

A senate committee slammed the bureau's handling of the inquiry, criticising its report for focusing on the pilot's actions and lacking analysis or details of factors that assist the wider industry.

Dolan says the government accepted the bureau's advice that no safety purpose would be served by reopening the investigation as was urged by the committee. 

At the bureau's request, he adds, Canadian transport safety regulators are currently conducting a peer-review of the the body's policies and how they were  implemented in several investigations, including Pel-Air. 

"We learnt that there are different views of our work and how we do it and that aviation safety is an area where people have different views and they don't always agree with you," Dolan says. 

Yet, he maintains that MH370 is the organisation's "greatest challenge yet" and the most intriguing one.

At the same time he is still overseeing more than 100 other aviation, marine and rail investigations. A few of his staff are also working with Dutch authorities on another recent air catastrophe  MH17, shot down over the Ukraine in July.

Dolan speaks slowly and chooses his words thoughtfully, confiding he has never felt at home in the spotlight.

"First and foremost in our minds is the families. If we can find answers we will give them certainty and closure. Bearing in mind this is a huge tragedy, it's also a mystery and we really do want to find the answer."

Dolan's term as a chief commissioner is due to finish in June 2016.

With his usual cautiousness he says the "most likely outcome" is that the plane would have been found by then. 

"There may theoretically be a point when we say we've done all we can and we haven't succeeded, but we're not really contemplating that yet and we certainly haven't reached that point."

When the term is complete, he has another challenge to address.

"At this stage, I have an incomplete novel sitting in my top drawer that I would like to spend more attention on," he says.

Dolan has a lifelong love of the written word. His collection of poetry Clouds and edges was printed by an independent publishing house in 1999 and another volume is ready to go. He's also a member of a poetry group that meets in Canberra monthly.

"I write lyric poetry. Short, focused on a moment, trying to encapsulate an emotion in visual imagery," he says.

When he is not writing, Dolan is also a big reader. Detective novels are one of his favourite genres, with Ian Rankin novels regularly on his bedside table. 

Could we perhaps see a novel where a detective must solve an unprecedented mystery as the entire world watches on?

No, Dolan says. His story is set in Sydney in the 1920s and explores the suffering of World War I veterans in a society that doesn't yet comprehend post-traumatic stress disorder.

Besides, adds the ever-diligent public servant, there are very clear rules that stop government workers using information for the purpose other than for what it was received. 

Life and times
1957  Born in Edinburgh, Scotland.
1961 Migrated to Australia with his family and lived in Armidale.
1979 Completed a Bachelor of Arts with honours in French at the University of New England.
1980 Started with the Australian Development Assistance Bureau and married Cynthia.
1984  Posted to Dhaka, Bangladesh.
1990 Moved to Department of Primary Industries and Energy and worked in various corporate management roles.
2001 Appointed executive director of Aviation and Airports.
2007 Became chief executive of Comcare.
2009 Appointed first chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.
But then again I am little bit prejudiced.. Undecided

MTF..P2 Tongue  
Reply
#8

To kick this thread off into New Year 2016, courtesy Captain Aux (originally published March 2015)... Wink

Quote:Op-Ed: Responsible Journalism and the Air Crash Du Jour

By Eric Auxier  October 21, 2015

By Eric Auxier / Published March 26, 2015

As a 20-year veteran of the A320 cockpit for a major U.S. airline, including the last 15 in the Captain’s seat, I have cringed at the utter misrepresentation of aviation facts often disseminated by news outlets and their self-proclaimed “aviation experts” endlessly paraded across the TV screen during coverage of the latest air disaster.
Coverage of the tragic crash of Germanwings 9525 has been no exception.

While today’s news suggests that the First Officer deliberately flew his A320 into the ground, until the CVR (cockpit voice recorder) was found and analyzed, worldwide news sources had faced a dearth of data to report on a major news story, and instead filled the gaps with both fantastic, and fantastically inaccurate, fluff.

By nature, as we all wait breathlessly for any morsel of breaking news regarding the fatal crash, our subconscious can’t help but race ahead, and fill the gaps between facts with speculation. In this hyperconnected age, this same speculative fill-in-the-blank occurs collectively, worldwide, via live, 24-hour news feeds such as CNN.

Worse, these very same reporters, who have zero experience with aviation, tend to let their own imaginations fly (excuse the pun.) Recent disasters saw such storied gems as CNN anchor Don Lemon’s “black hole theory” about MH370, promptly one-upped in absurdity by former DOT Inspector General Mary Shaivo’s reply that a “tiny black hole would swallow the entire universe.” Graphs depicting the plane du jour are a comic cavalcade of inaccuracies, such as a four-engine A320, or a double-decker Boeing 737.

And let’s not forget such sage scrolling tidbits as, “Boeing 777 will struggle to maintain altitude once the fuel tanks are empty.”

At least, so far, no news source has come up with a Germanwings equivalent of Captain Sum Ting Wong and First Officer Wi Tu Lo.

Seriously, however—and with the deepest condolences and respects to the victims and families of the Germanwings 9525 tragedy—these endless speculations and haphazard reporting have become blackly comical at best, and wildly irresponsible at worst. Families and loved ones of those lost tend to hang on every word disseminated by the international media, and somewhere between Walter Williams and Brian Williams, we seem to have lost that sacred mantra of journalism: that the public journal is a public trust.

To be sure, some highly qualified individuals occasionally grace the TV screen with their pearls of wisdom—international A330 pilot Karlene Petitt, author of Flight to Success, comes to mind. But for every expert, there seems to be some Ya-hoo whose sole qualification is that he watched Airport ’77.

Covering all angles of a news story is one thing, but unhealthy obsession with a single aspect is another. For example, in the first 48 hours after the 9525 crash, news outlets were quick to question the design of the Airbus itself. Known for its high level of automation, this very same design philosophy has come under intense scrutiny. While somewhat justified in the aftermath of Air France 447, it is nevertheless human nature to fear the unknown and, like Stanley Kubrick’s HAL 9000 computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey, suspicion often falls first on that which is least understood.

When contacted for this piece, Karlene Petitt agreed: “Having flown the A330 around the world for six years, I will stand by the plane and fly it any time. The A330 is extremely stable, and the technology brilliant. It’s only those who don’t understand the technology, that have problems. It’s not the plane.  I suppose we fear what we don’t know, but the Airbus should not be one of those fears.”

Yes, mechanical things fail. Yes, an airplane with over 1 million parts and dozens of computers will need regular maintenance. During my recent Skype interview with Qantas A380 Captain Richard De Crespigny, author of QF32 and the captain aboard Flight 32 during an inflight engine explosion, Captain De Crespigny said, “If you want to fly a high-tech airplane, there is a responsibility to understand the systems. Because when those systems fail—and they do fail—it’s up to the pilot to recover.”

Indeed, the Airbus is one of the most high-tech airliners ever built. While it was specifically designed to allow a less-experienced pilot to safely operate, it is incumbent upon every pilot to understand these systems in order to overcome any possible event.

But, really, this philosophy applies to any pilot and their aircraft. Regardless of aircraft type, safety always boils down to basic stick and rudder.

OK, enough venting. Let’s set the record straight on this whole Airbus thing. While the latest evidence for Germanwings 9525 points toward pilot suicide, even if this accident did prove to be a design flaw of the Airbus itself, the safety record still ranks the A320 family (A318-A321) in the top five safest airline models of all time. Odds of dying in an A320: 1 in 792 million flights.

Lifetime odds of dying in any airplane: 1 in 11 million.

Lifetime odds of dying in a car: 1 in 77.

Ironically, during an exhaustive CNN panel discussion by aviation experts, Cockpit Confidential author Patrick Smith offered that news channels should avoid obsessive over-speculation about plane crashes. In doing so, Smith says, it exacerbates the misperception of an increasing danger in the skies. Retired American Airlines pilot Jim Tilmon agreed, going further to voice his concerns about discussing—at length and on worldwide feed—security measures in place aboard the world’s airlines.

Captain Tilmon was promptly shouted down by CNN’s “resident aviation expert” Richard Quest. While Quest won AIB’s 2014 “personality of the year,” I fail to see how this qualifies him as an aviation expert. Best I can tell, his expertise in aviation stems from his possession of a very loud and obnoxious English accent, and possession of a passenger seat on the last Concorde’s flight.

I wholeheartedly agree with Smith and Tilmon’s points, especially their concern over airline security. By their very nature, these issues are best left unearthed. By discussing these issues publicly, was airline security compromised? Perhaps not, but it seems we are treading a very hazardous line for the sole purpose of filling a few measly minutes of air time.

In this very column, in an Op Ed on MH370, airline captain Mark Berry, author of 13,760 Feet, said that speculation can be a good thing. I agree, to a point. But when speculation turns to over-speculation, when fill-in-the-speculative-blank becomes its own news story, the media—intentionally or no—begins to fill the public psyche with a false sense of insecurity. Suddenly, air travel is perceived as dangerous. Conceivably, a family planning their vacation might decide to drive instead of fly—and thus increase their risk exponentially.

And that flies square in the face of public trust.

—30—
Note: Along with five other pilot-writers, Karlene Petitt (karlenepetitt.com), Captain Mark Berry (marklberry.com) and I blog monthly together in a series called, “Blogging in Formation.” This April 1st (quite apropos for April Fool’s Day, I would say,) we will be blogging about this very issue: Top Pet Peeves of How the Press Covers Aviation. Join us on the discussion.


  [Image: Auxier-Cockpit-Michael-Hesley-Photography.jpeg]
Michael Hesley Photography

AUTHOR BIO
Eric “Cap’n Aux” Auxier is an airline pilot by day, writer by night, and kid by choice.
An A320 Captain for a major U.S. airline with over 21,000 hours in the cockpit, he is also a freelance writer, novelist and blogger (capnaux.com). His second novel, The Last Bush Pilots, captured the coveted Amazon TOP 100 Breakthrough Novels, 2013. His 5th and newest book, There I Wuz! Adventures From 3 Decades in the Sky, Volume II, will be available on Amazon Kindle in June and in print in July at http://amazon.com/author/ericauxier
Mr. Auxier makes his home in Phoenix,
 
Top job Cap'n Aux & a happy New Year to you & yours...P2 (on behalf of PAIN) Big Grin
Reply
#9

Interesting article from Ben Sandilands in Plane Talking @ Crikey; definitely food for holiday thought.  

Quote:BS – “Most of my circle of much flown family and friends have given up caring what the airlines or card companies actually say or do, and would much rather not be pestered with messages like ‘you have three days in which to save 135,000 points that will expire’. Flying has become a necessary chore, and courtesy and efficiency and a reasonable expectation that you won’t actually be killed by some idiot executive deciding to cut this or that corner in operational procedures are prime considerations, rather than the risk of no longer being a ‘platinum’”.

“This loss of the ‘magic’ of flying has of course been apparent, and been well written up, since at least the late 90s. It’s just getting more pressing in 2016 than ever”.

Due to circumstances beyond my control I spent many hours on board aircraft as a passenger in my very early years, backwards and forwards to boarding schools etc.  In those days you turned up washed and polished; on your very best behaviour, tingling with anticipation, enjoying every aspect of ‘the adventure’.  Aviation, being a ‘family affair’ was always to the forefront of discussion, the ‘culture’, the politics, the accidents, incidents, breakdowns, lurks, perks, ‘management’ tales and ‘real news’ of far flung places were usual topics.  I can’t think of a flight I did not enjoy.  Natural progression from regular flight deck visitor to taking out a first command did not take any of the shine off the experience; I enjoyed every minute, even ‘dead heading’ home was fun.

It’s been a decade now since I enjoyed the ‘passenger’ experience; in fact, it’s got to the stage where I dread it.  The seemingly endless wait to check in a bag; the security waiting; the long walk through the confusing array of ‘shopping’ opportunities while looking for a way out of the trap, desperately seeking a sign to direct me to a bay number; the long, tedious wait to board; the ‘in tunnel’ backpack attack from some fool without the native wit or courtesy to remove it; the endless waits in aisles while someone parks two or three large ‘carry-ons’; eventually getting to a seat which is cramped and uncomfortable; always with a tiresome person behind who insists on using the seat back for football practice; the one in front who insists on ‘full reclining’; all of this before the scrum while parking and dodging the previously loaded ‘carry-on’ as the aisles are once again blocked solid, followed by the long walk and even longer wait for your baggage to turn up on the carousel.  The best bit, exiting the terminal to blessed real light, real air and the long taxi queue.  

I don’t know why travelling as a passenger has become a dreaded chore; but for 2016, my firm resolution is to avoid it, whenever and wherever possible.  

Quote:In this sense 2016 could become the year of ‘too much of an increasingly less than good thing’ as the full service product is redefined to be closer to purgatory, and the outer circle of hell in low cost carriers comes with affordable extras to deliver superior seat pitch, and real food on a full sized tray table.

Toot toot
Reply
#10

Another GOOD - Big Grin 

Finally a good news aviation story, well covered by the other Aunty... Wink

Quote:Adventurer Tracey Curtis-Taylor's England-to-Australia solo flight a homage to aviation pioneer Amy Johnson


By James Dunlevie and Joanna Crothers
Updated Sat at 4:03pmSat 2 Jan 2016, 4:03pm

[Image: 7064394-3x2-700x467.jpg] Photo: Adventurer Tracey Curtis-Taylor speaks to media in Darwin after her 20 day solo flight from England. (ABC News: Joanna Crothers)

Flying long distances solo in a bi-plane is daunting enough in modern times; to have done it in the 1930s is bordering on superhuman.
[Image: 7064494-3x2-340x227.jpg]
Photo:
English aviation pioneer Amy Johnson, pictured two years before her death in 1941. (Supplied: Rex/Shutterstock)


Canada-based British adventurer Tracey Curtis-Taylor has some idea what aviation pioneer Amy Johnson went through to become the first female pilot to fly solo from England to Australia in 1930.

Landing in Darwin after 20 days of flying in an open cockpit 1942 Boeing Stearman, Curtis-Taylor described seeing the Australian coastline as a feeling of "euphoria, relief".

Beginning on October 1 in England, Curtis-Taylor piloted her "Spirit of Artemis" over 23 countries; Europe, across the Mediterranean Sea to Jordan, over the Arabian Desert, across the Gulf of Oman to Pakistan, through India and on to Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia before crossing the Timor Sea and landing in Darwin on Friday — a journey of over 20,000 kilometres "following in the slipstream" of Johnson's epic feat.

"I'm feeling just a bit windblown, sunburnt and a bit punch drunk," a jubilant but weary Curtis-Taylor told assembled media as she stood in front of her aircraft in Darwin.

"This is where Amy Johnson touched down in 1930, so Darwin was the big moment for her.

"She was a 20th century icon in terms of what she achieved. My flight is very much a tribute to her. It is celebrating what the pioneers achieved and what women achieve now in aviation."

Johnson died in 1941, aged 37, after her plane crashed into the near-freezing waters of the Thames Estuary in England.

Despite a ship crew seeing her parachute come down and Johnson alive in the water, neither her body nor her plane have been recovered.

'You're only as good as your last landing'

Fully exposed to the elements in the open cockpit, Curtis-Taylor had to contend with rain, cold, heat and everything that comes with flying a plane that was designed in the 1920s as a trainer for US Army and Navy pilots.

"It's fairly devastating on the skin and the hair and so forth. It's tiring, it's really tiring. It's the noise, the vibration, the exposure," she said.

[Image: 7064402-3x2-340x227.jpg]
Photo:
Cockpit of 1940s era biplane, with modern addition of satellite navigation. (Supplied)


The perils of solo flying in vintage aircraft were not lost on Curtis-Taylor. Despite the aid of a modern satellite navigation system, the cockpit of her Boeing Stearman is largely as it was in the 1940s.

And while staying in the air is tricky, it is coming down safely that is upmost in the mind of any pilot of vintage aircraft.

"You're only as good as your last landing and I just wanted to do a good one," Curtis-Taylor she said of her touchdown in Darwin.

From her first flying lesson at age 16, Curtis-Taylor — whose list of previous vocations includes "diamond valuer" and a stint with the Diplomatic Service at the Foreign Office in Whitehall — has taken on several endurance feats of air and land travel, with the England to Australia homage to Johnson being the pinnacle so far.

[Image: 7064398-3x2-340x227.jpg]
Photo:
Tracey Curtis-Taylor flies her Boeing Stearman over temples in Bagan, Burma en route to Australia. (Supplied)


Curtis-Taylor said the highlights of this trip included "flying over Myanmar [Burma], the Dead Sea, the Arabian desert and seeing sights such as the Taj Mahal from the air".
Much of the journey has been dedicated to visiting schools along the way, with Curtis-Taylor hoping to inspire girls to follow their dreams.

Despite touching down after her epic journey, Curtis-Taylor already has her sights set on the next adventure.

Her trusty Stearman is to be shipped to America and flown across the United States to complete the world flight in 2016.



Aviatrix Tracey Curtis-Taylor flying over Europe in poor weather.
Choc frog for the ABC - well done.. Big Grin
MTF..P2 Tongue
Reply
#11

(12-30-2015, 09:02 PM)Peetwo Wrote:  
Quote:Russell Crowe slams Virgin Australia for hoverboard ban



  • Gina Rushton
  • The Australian
  • December 30, 2015 12:00AM
[Image: gina_rushton.png]
Journalist
Sydney
Gina Rushton is a Journalist at The Australian. She has previously worked as a publicist and media assistant.

[Image: d636cf570b439c87e13c4ec4399aba14?width=650]Russell Crowe’s tweet.

Russell Crowe has vowed “never again” to fly with Virgin Australia after the actor and his children were kicked off a flight for trying to bring hoverboards in their carry-on bags.

“No Segway boards as luggage? Too late to tell us at ­airport. Kids and I offloaded. Goodbye Virgin. Never again,” Crowe tweeted yesterday, calling the airline “ridiculous”.

An hour later, having rec­eived no response from the airline, he tweeted: “I’m awaiting your reply; where is your duty of responsibility in this? Why not tell me when I am booking my ticket?”

The Virgin Australia Twitter account responded by reminding Crowe that hoverboards had been banned on most airlines and this was outlined in emails he would have received.

“We have communi­cated this on Facebook and Twitter, as well as through the media,”

Virgin Australia tweeted. “We understand your frustration, however, please appreciate that safety is our No 1 priority.”

Other airlines, including Emirates and Qantas, have publicly announced a blanket ban on hoverboards as carry-on or checked luggage.

It isn’t the first time Crowe has taken to Twitter to air grievances with a Virgin-branded company. In 2012, when he was shooting Les Miserables in Britain, he was invited to check out facilities at the Virgin Active’s Royal Berkshire Health & Racquets Club in Bracknell, Eng­land, but he was refused entry for not being a member.

In a series of tweets he called the staff “Hoity-toity’’ and urged owner Richard Branson to “have fit/smart folk rep your brand’’.

High-profile Sydney lawyer Chris Murphy thanked Crowe for raising awareness about the hoverboards. “We had our one, a Christmas present, packed to go away on holidays,” he tweeted.

Other Twitter users were less grateful. Comedian Joel Creasey tweeted: “You’re a millionaire, babe. Get some perspective.”

Crowe responded: “I’m a fath­er, Joel, with two kids at an airport, trying to start our holiday

"Killing each other is uncool." - Back to the bad  Confused

Courtesy Comet & Dan Wink :
Quote:24
[Image: 21b60ac190c348d8e493a7713f62753a?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] comet
Posted January 5, 2016 at 7:54 am | Permalink

Some days later…

News sites are reporting that a hoverboard spontaneously ignited and burned down a Melbourne house:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-05/ho...re/7067414
The lithium batteries on hoverboards are large. Looking at the photo, the house is now nothing but a burned-out crisp. Imagine if that happened on an airliner. It would be inconceivable that any airline would allow hoverboards on an aircraft, though probably some overseas airlines do.

Back to Russell Crowe. He was aggrieved that he was not allowed to endanger the lives of 180 people by taking two hoverboards on a flight.

The media should have focused on Crowe’s disregard for public safety. But the news stories mainly followed the line that Virgin Australia ruined a movie star’s holiday with his kids.

Maybe it has not yet penetrated the Australian psych that lithium and flying are a bad combination.

25
[Image: c73957db1e9cfcaadb4a4d6bc11c9dc9?s=32&d=identicon&r=g] Dan Dair
Posted January 5, 2016 at 9:49 am | Permalink

comet,

As so often, the modern media will go for the easy target.

Maybe instead they could have used the Russell Crowe incident to highlight his (one of our ‘betters’) ignorance, as an example of how little ‘we, the ordinary people’ understand about the consequences of lithium batteries & still less the greater problems of fire on-board aircraft.

(eg. British Airtours Fire, Manchester. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Ai...Flight_28M)

And that aircraft never even left the runway & still there was considerable loss of life.!!

&..back to the good Smile

Maybe..just maybe old mate Russ has done us a favour, here is Ben's take on the Melbourne house fire story:
Quote:Hoverboard burns down house near airport

Ben Sandilands | Jan 05, 2016 10:18AM |
[Image: 7067424-3x2-700x467-610x407.jpg]
The hoverboard in the house it burned down, courtesy ABC

The most important thing to note about this morning’s Melbourne hoverboard fire that burned down a house which coincidentally was near Essendon Airport was that the house wasn’t at 40,000 feet at the time.

The fire was fast and totally destructive. It would have destroyed an airliner at altitude and anywhere but very close to an airport well equipped with emergency services.
Needless to say, the media has immediately drawn the parallel with the outburst made by actor and South Sydney Rabbitoh’s co-savior Russell Crowe when Virgin Australia recently refused to fly him and family with hoverboards in their luggage.

Hoverboards are banned for safety reasons on all Australian passenger airlines, indeed, just about every airline the Crowe family are likely to fly on in the world, and for that matter, at least some of the corporate jet hire alternatives.

They can burst into flames while charging, after charging, and it seems at times, at whim. Burning to death is a nasty end, and causing a large number of other passengers to suffer a similar fate is pretty confronting too, assuming the thought ever crosses the minds of those thinking the rules don’t apply to them.

Any lingering sympathy libertarians, or even dimwits, might have for the position taken by Mr Crowe went up in flames near Essendon Airport (where he can catch a corporate jet hire) this morning.  (The classic earlier story on that incident is this one in Melbourne’s Herald Sun.)

All that is really needed for hoverboards to become acceptable in places other than crowded footpaths is for the battery technology to catch up with the ‘fun’.

In the meantime, when you check in at the airport, answer the hazardous goods question on the screen truthfully, as to his credit Mr Crowe did. Killing each other is uncool.
  
While on lithium batteries & aviation, I intercepted this tweet from the biggest Pilot union in the US, ALPA:
Quote:
Quote:ALPA@WeAreALPA 12 hours ago


Lithium batteries pose a safety threat to our aircraft and must be properly regulated. http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/technology/264139-congress-must-act-to-ensure-the-safety-of-lithium-battery … #FAAReAuth #Congress

Airlines have been making news lately for imposing restrictions on certain items aboard aircraft. An all-out ban on hoverboards and limitations on e-cigarettes in checked luggage are among the latest items to be restricted on passenger flights due to safety concerns.

While these two items might sound dramatically different, the reality is that they pose the same problem in-flight: the potential for their lithium battery power source to self-ignite.

These batteries pose a safety threat to our aircraft and must be properly regulated.

Many passenger airlines have voluntarily banned bulk shipments of lithium-ion batteries because of the dangers they pose, and we fully support these actions. A single defective battery in the cargo compartment can overheat and cause a runaway fire that becomes too hot for standard fire suppression systems to quell. FAA testing has also shown that these batteries quickly produce tremendous heat and emit thick smoke and flammable gas which can fill an entire plane – including the cockpit – in less than eight minutes.

Under pressure, the gasses released in a lithium-battery fire can explode. The voluntary ban does not include bulk shipments of electronic equipment with lithium-ion batteries installed.  

Despite the known risk, lithium batteries have not been classified as a hazardous material.  As a result, unlike finger nail polish and other common products, these batteries have no special packaging requirements regardless of the number of batteries being shipped. The pilot-in-command, responsible for the safe transport of the aircraft, may not even be informed of the presence of certain types of lithium batteries onboard.

This is a gaping hole in our safety regulations and one that Congress must address.

In the recent past, lithium batteries have been cited as the direct cause of at least three airline accidents that involved fires on the aircraft. In 2010, UPS Flight 6 crashed due to a lithium battery fire, killing the two pilots on board. Unless Congress takes action now to reverse an existing law that prohibits the U.S.  Department of Transportation from adequately regulating shipments of lithium batteries by air, another tragic incident could happen at any time.

Bulk shipments of lithium batteries, which are ubiquitous in our daily lives and enable us to connect via cell phones, computers and cars, pose a real threat on airliners.  Until fire suppression systems capable of containing lithium battery fires are developed and installed on commercial aircraft, these battery shipments have no place on board airliners.  As Congress turns its attention to the reauthorization for the Federal Aviation Administration, it must regulate shipments of lithium batteries – lives depend on it.
Canoll is president of the Air Line Pilots Association, Int’l.
  


MTF..P2 Confused
Reply
#12

MH370 - The dangers of desktop journalism?

The following article by Robyn Ironside (courtesy the Sunday Mail) on the MH370 SIO search developments (or not Huh ), seems to be somewhat disjointed and quotes from 'exclusive' news filed almost a year ago & then jumps to recent news from just days ago:
Quote:ATSB boss admits MH370 search vessels may have missed plane

January 30, 20165:08pm




[img=0x0]http://pixel.tcog.cp1.news.com.au/track/news/content/v1/origin:video_integrator.9ta2NlMDE6PiIh2w9k3hNa2yiTozW-Xg?t_product=video&t_template=../video/player[/img]
[Image: 2f607d3e5c97db02aa59ddfa3fe1c39f]
Fugro Discovery heading out to the search zone in the southern Indian Ocean. Picture: ATSB

Robyn Ironside News Corp Australia Network

[b]EXCLUSIVE[/b]
MH370 SEARCH co-ordinators have revealed the missing plane could have literally slipped through the cracks in the southern Indian Ocean floor — and crews are retracing their steps to be sure.

As the unexplained disappearance of the Boeing 777 approaches its two-year anniversary on March 8, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau has confirmed the possibility the plane may have been missed in areas already searched.

Chief Commissioner Martin Dolan said challenging terrain and deep fissures in the sea bed had meant they were not always able to get a “good enough sonar image”.

[Image: 2e4d9028cb0f528cb99c484800a7b189]
Australian Transport Safety Bureau Chief Commissioner Martin Dolan has conceded MH370 may be in an area already searched. Picture. News Corp AustraliaSource:News Limited

“We’re taking another look because the areas where we haven’t been certain are large enough to contain an aircraft — which is why we’re going over them,” said Commissioner Dolan.

“The sea floor is very rugged and complex.”

The hazards involved in the search have been highlighted in recent weeks by damage to the expensive equipment including a lost $1 million tow fish, and a broken communications pole.

Commissioner Dolan said there was still an area “two-thirds the size of Tasmania” to search, and hopes remained high the Boeing 777 would be found before the operation was completed.

“There was never a guarantee of success, but we still think there’s a high likelihood of success before we finish (in June),” he said.

“I still wake up every day thinking today could be the day.”

Families were being kept well informed about the search progress and knew there was a possibility the operation could end in June with nothing found.

[Image: 1a3edd51046c911bb05d09ce7da4e6f1]
Sister and daughter of Cathy Lawton, Jeanette Maguire (L) and Amanda Lawton ®. Picture: Ric Frearson/News Corp AustraliaSource:News Corp Australia

Brisbane’s Jeanette Maguire, whose sister and brother-in-law Cathy and Bob Lawton were among six Australians on the plane, said it was difficult to face the prospect of never knowing what happened.

“I don’t know how we’re going to deal with that,” said Ms Maguire.

“It’s something we do talk about a lot together. We have complete confidence in the search being undertaken but you do have to be realistic.”

Joint Agency Coordination Centre chief Judith Zielke said they had been preparing families since last April of the intention not to expand the search beyond the current 120,000 square kilometre area.

“No matter what we do that’s an extremely difficult thing for the families to come to terms with and we will continue to hope that we’re successful (in the search),” said Ms Zielke.

A Chinese vessel will set out for Australia on Sunday January 31 to join the search bringing to four the number of ships involved.

[Image: 685f577ffff5b43891093deed3eb4af1]
A mud volcano on the ocean floor where Fugro Discovery became separated from its tow fish. Graphic: ATSBSource:Supplied

Commissioner Dolan said the ATSB was still awaiting the outcome of a French investigation into the flaperon confirmed as coming from MH370.

“At this stage we’ve not heard anything from the French that would enable us to form a view about what position the flaperon was in when it separated from the aircraft which is the key question for us,” he said. “It’s quite possible we won’t get anything definitive on that.”

Malaysia is also due to release another report on the anniversary of the plane’s disappearance, en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

“We’re still waiting to understand what it is that they’re intending to publish, said Mr Dolan.

“That’s up to them.”
  
That strange, disjointed, tabloid article has elicited this highly critical & sometimes sarcastic, word lashing from Ben Sandilands Wink

Quote:News goes ga-ga over year old MH370 news

Ben Sandilands | Jan 31, 2016 8:36AM [Image: the-cruel-sea-state-for-MH370-search-610...10x341.jpg]
The cruel sea beneath which the durable wreckage of MH370 lies

The News organisation definition of ‘exclusive’ when it comes to MH370 appears to be reporting news that is more than a year old. - Big Grin Luv it Ben

The Sunday Mail is today reporting an ATSB admission that it may have missed the wreckage of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet during its sea floor search of the south Indian Ocean because of difficult terrain and the need for higher resolution sonar scans.

The ATSB announced this on 14 January last year. The issues were also raised in reports in defence intelligence dispatches and in Plane Talking in August and November last year and last week, when further official announcements were made by deputy PM Warren Truss about the deployment of a ship from China equipped with the very deep level capable synthetic aperture imaging sonar.

Perhaps for News nothing is exclusive until its gets around to reporting old news and puts it behind a paywall for those it takes for suckers.

The Sunday Times story is also illustrated with a map captioned “Suspected plane wreckage found off the coast of southern Thailand may be from MH370.”

That discovery was promptly found to be unrelated to MH370, and identified as coming from a Japanese satellite launch rocket by major News title The Wall Street Journal and later by other news services who not only have the resources to check the validity of such claims, but use them.

This morning’s year old rehashing of news that News possibly hopes you may have forgotten about comes hot on the heels of its embarrassing persistence with the conspiracy theories of ex pilot Byron Bailey in relation to the disappearance of MH370 on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on 8 March 2014.

Mr Bailey’s stories verbal the ATSB led search and attack the body for doing or saying things it hasn’t done or said, and repeated as fact false stories spread about the flight climbing to 45,000 feet to asphyxiate its passengers while also misquoting a US expert on the significance of the wing part found on La Reunion Island last July.

Which is not to say Mr Bailey’s suspicions about other aspects of the flight may be incorrect.  The ATSB was moved to publish a detail rebuttal of the Bailey nonsense, which contrary to Press Council standards, News has ignored.

If you want an antidote to the rubbish News has published on MH370 in recent weeks, that rebuttal can be read in full here.

Interestingly it is not the first time that Robyn Ironside has come under criticism for aviation related stories, here is a blog piece courtesy flight.org:
Quote:17

Oct
A Look at News Corp’s Article on Virgin Australia’s Gold Coast Near Miss


Aviation is more than familiar with the barrage of junk journalism we get from major syndicated news services. The digital age has ensured that their editorial focus has shifted from genuine investigative pieces to the drip-fed crap that often wallpapers sites like News.com.au and CourierMail – apparently catering for our insatiable need for new and fresh information. The digital evolution has not only created generations of media-hungry consumers, but also a new breed of journalist that determines subject matter based on Twitter trends or “What’s Hot on YouTube”. If either of those avenues fail them, they’ll turn to Viral aggregators or cute cats. It doesn’t seem to matter what the content is… as long as there’s new content to publish.

The result of this media focus is the bastardisation and over-hyped editorial bias of anything aviation news related. Sadly, very few people – including those that proclaim themselves as experts on national TV or by way of podcasts or websites – usually have any idea what they’re talking about.

Around 9.15am on Sunday the 12th of November, a Virgin Australia Boeing 737 was on approach to Gold Coast’s Runway 32 when, during the approach, separation standards appeared that they might be compromised. As a precaution, the aircraft flew a standard go-around without incident and returned for an on-time arrival.

Robyn Ironside [Image: twitter.com.png] and Peter Hall first published their understanding of the occurrence we’ve just described on the Courier Mail [Image: couriermail.com.au.png] website as “Beachgoers watch near plane collision”. It later appeared as “Virgin plane and light aircraft in close call over Gold Coast airport”. Based on apparent reports from “parents watching their children enjoy nippers at nearby Bilinga club”, the writers made the determination that the go-around was a near collision.

The article was initially published on the Courier Mail [Image: couriermail.com.au.png] and later syndicated on a number of other associated websites. The story was later plagiarised by picked up by a number of others not represented by the news conglomerate. The problem with fishing for news, as is often the case with second-tier news providers, is that they perpetuate distorted facts and negligent reporting without independent checking, verification or accountability.

The article is filled with inaccuracies and very conflicting information; we’ll try to make sense of it.

First, a look at the News Corp video (based on Flight Aware [Image: flightaware.com.png] data) that the author believes represents the flight path of the involved aircraft.
 
Despite the numerous references to the Boeing 737 conducting a go-around because of a Cessna taking off from Runway 32, the video accompanying shows what the authors obviously identified as a near miss (in-flight) – and it wasn’t.

When the video stops and shows what News Corp claims is two aircraft coming into close proximity, requiring what they claim is an aggressive turn, it is actually two aircraft operating at least 5 miles laterally from each other (over 9 kilometres) and nearly 10,000 feet vertically. To say that they don’t present a threat to each other is an understatement. More on this below.

What Actually Happened

The only go-around data recorded by Flight Aware on the morning of Sunday the 12th was Velocity 511 (VOZ511), a scheduled passenger service from Sydney to the Gold Coast.
[Image: gold-coast-arrival-voz511.jpg]

Based on Flight Aware data, the flight path is illustrated as follows:
[Image: voz511-goaround.jpg]

The flight path is completely normal until final. The aircraft conducts a go-around and makes a slight left turn by about 15 or 20 degrees before conducting another left turn at the upwind end of the airport, and then completes a visual circuit to land.

A couple of minutes prior to VOZ511’s go-around, a Tiger A320 with the flight number of TGW607 departed on the APAGI departure. It’s this aircraft that will later be identified by the author (in their video) as coming into conflict with VOZ511. The next aircraft in queue for departure, VH-RJB, a Cessna Citation (business jet), was either slow to take off or the tower didn’t properly judge the arrival of VOZ511. Either way, separation was compromised. No big deal.

We put the following video together very quickly so please excuse the sloppiness. It shows the actual go-around and discredits the Courier Mail’s claim that there was a “near miss” in flight.
 
The Cessna Citation jet isn’t consistent with the reports of a “tiny Cessna” that was reported in the article. The description conjures up images of a small piston engine aircraft in the minds of most people while a multi-million dollar business jet elicits a different reaction. While not overly important, it does further discredit the article in question.

The profile view constructed from Flight Aware doesn’t show the point from which the go-around was conducted. Because Flight Aware uses a predictive feature at times, the profile plot shows the aircraft as low as 700 feet (over 2 miles, or nearly 4 kilometres, laterally), although it could have been lower.

It appears that the aircraft was fully configured when an instruction for the go-around was issued (or when the crew initiated the go-around) as they were approaching or were just past Terranora Creek. After making a slight left turn, the aircraft continues to approximately 1400 feet where another left turn is made before the crew conduct a visual left circuit at 2500 feet. From interpolating data, it appears that if the controller had another 5 or 10 seconds, the go-around wouldn’t have been necessary.




Quote:Bilinga Surf Club is on the eastern side of the main A1 motorway, over 1.5 kilometres from the runway, and those on the beach have no view of the runway whatsoever.

Contrary to the ill-informed diatribe in the article, the aircraft didn’t pass over the main beach. As with every single RW32 arrival, the Boeing 737 would have passed over Terranora Creek. If this were the case, and if this is where the youth surf group were congregated, the aircraft would be passing significantly higher over the inland shoreline than other arrivals – hardly a big concern. The aircraft would have also passed within sight of Currumbin Creek to the north, but at this point, the aircraft was at nearly 1300 feet and climbing (around 1000 feet of vertical airspace separated the two aircraft in question at this point). Either way, the shoreline doesn’t provide a view of the runway or tarmac area. Any eyewitness account would be flawed.

[Image: voz511-profile-view.jpg]
Is a Go-around Dangerous?

Despite the sensational bullshit from the article, there was never any danger. Go-arounds are conducted for countless reasons; from unstable approaches, separation standards, to unfavourable wind shifts. They’re a completely normal and everyday occurrence that doesn’t warrant any kind of media attention.

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority claims that 800 go-arounds are conducted each year although it’s believed that these are ATC-initiated procedural instructions. The figure is actually closer to 5000… and over 20,000 if the entire register is considered. It’s impossible to have a clear picture of go-around data (including missed approaches) because of the way it’s recorded and/or reported.

What is a Loss of Separation Assurance?
From the ATSB [Image: airservicesaustralia.com.png] website:



Quote:A loss of separation assurance (LOSA) occurs when there has not been a clear application of a separation standard. This can happen for a range of reasons, and does not mean there has been any infringement of separation standards.
When two aircraft experience an infringement of the minimum separation distance (which varies depending on the airspace classification), it is referred to as a loss of separation (LOS). A LOS does not mean that the aircraft were at any risk of colliding, or that the incident was a ‘near miss’, it simply means that separation standards were not maintained.

The ATSB will often publish LOSA reports and publish them on their website. This is done purely to ensure the highest of standards… not because they represent a serious infraction worth investigating.

The Article and Journalistic Integrity

It’s a challenge to identify with facts in this article – so we won’t try. Needless to say, the sensational editorial bias and deceptive headlines suggest an incident far removed from what actually occurred. It was link-bait. Period.

The only news to come from this article is the lack of understanding both Robyn Ironside and Peter Hall have with regard to the industry that they claim to represent. We engaged in a dialogue with Robyn Ironside [Image: twitter.com.png] on Twitter shortly after the article was published, although she’s since deleted any tweets referencing our conversion (so much for accountability). Nonetheless, we made screenshots [Image: facebook.com.png].

Robyn Ironside claims to have reported the article as a Loss of Separation Assurance with regard to all the facts. You decide for Courier Mail [Image: couriermail.com.au.png].

Ironside also claims to have made calls to the ATSB, Airservices Australia, and Virgin Australia for information. Of course it’s likely that none of them would have been aware of the incident that early after the occurrence… particularly on a Sunday. Why? It’s no big deal.
[Image: ironsider-atc-intervention.jpg]
Ironside further illustrates her ignorance and lack of adequate investigation with the comment, “Had there not been ATC intervention who knows”. Pilots fly aircraft, Robyn, not ATC. Had ATC not intervened the outcome would have been the same.

[Image: 106-5-kiss.jpg]

Ironside seems to have gathered only as many facts as were necessary to support the statements made by the reporting witness. There’s an inherent editorial-bias that many journalists fall victim to in the pursuit of a story that has the potential to present as sensational or viral-worthy. Even when looking for Flight Aware data, Ironside has found footage that seems to support her assertion of a near-miss even though, in actuality, the footage had nothing to do with the event she describes… and doesn’t actually show any kind of infraction. Ironside and Hall have literally manufactured an incident out of nothing.

Journalists have an ethical, moral and professional responsibility not to distort or manufacture facts. In reality, the “facts” reported to a journalist are nothing more than hearsay evidence, and this evidence forms only a small part of any argument that might support any kind of fact. In this case, however, Ironside has used a single anonymous source (with their own possible ‘aircraft noise’ agenda, as is common around the Gold Coast) and a flawed video to launch an unwarranted attack on aviation safety.

Publishers often refer to their “harm minimisation” strategies that are used to measure the damage that their articles might cause. In this case, harm is done to, but far from limited to, the Gold Coast Aiport, Virgin Australia and those passengers on board the airliner that now believe that they were involved in a near miss… and the harm or damage is all predicated on false or manufactured data. This blatant and disregard for factual reporting can only be seen as professionally negligent, leaving the publisher and/or author liable for civil prosecution.



Quote:“If the facts don’t fit the theory, change the facts.”
– Albert Einstein

The news article had some minor changes and corrections when published on News.com.au [Image: news.com.au.png] and a few other syndicated websites, so it’s possible we had moderate success after taking Ironside to task on Twitter. Still, every subsequent article was almost worse that the last.

Ironside has little option but to revise her story, issue a correction, and delete the offending video.

Aviation Media Watch
As an industry we’ve become far too forgiving of incompetence and misrepresentation. Very little of what we read and hear from ‘aerospace experts’, podcasters and aviation journalists comes close to representing the broader industry. Like Ironside, many call themselves an aviation journalist, but don’t know the first thing about aviation. This has to change.

For the reason just described, we’re going to have out own little ‘Media Watch’ column where we’ll pull apart some of the information propagated in the media and dissect it in search of the truth. If you come across some mediocre reporting, let us know

Thanks to Marty's excellent, now old but gold post that IMO sits quite appropriately in this thread... Wink

In defence of RI, I do get the impression that she is just a small pawn in a much bigger game that has seen a national newspaper in recent weeks regurgitating essentially old news files & theories related to MH370. Where that game is headed who knows, I just hope that respect will be shown for the MH370 NOK while the NewsCorp v ATSB battle continues. Keep the JACC head Judith Zielke's comment (in regard to the wind up of the search) in mind before publishing some of this rubbish.
Quote:“No matter what we do that’s an extremely difficult thing for the families to come to terms with and we will continue to hope that we’re successful (in the search),”
 Remember false hope is sometimes a lot more soul destroying than no hope.. Undecided  


MTF...P2 Angel  
Reply
#13

E-Ducking - Nuff.  Mini rant – just a small one.

I am totally over ‘aggressive’ marketing.  I solemnly declare to never, not ever, no matter what, look at ‘Plane-Talking’: ever again; and, I count Sandilands a mate.

Even on my Gmail  - FFS – every time I open it (FWIW).  Every time I try to look at an article by Ben – big RED advertising.  Yo dickhead.  Put it where the sun don’t shine.  IF I wanted to subscribe – I would have done so, long ago, when the Crikey forum was relevant.  

WTF are these people thinking? Never again.

There I feel much better now.
Reply
#14

Is Sandilands off his meds?  Consensus seems to indicate yes. The one time ‘crusader’, famed for intelligent, searching articles into the CASA and ATSB has had an epiphany (or lobotomy).

The fearless, frank discussions, particularly about the unholy mess ATSB were serving up to industry were legend; and, useful. No longer.  The spiteful attack on independent researcher Mike Chillit was a disgrace to this self proclaimed ‘last real journalist’ in town. Then there is the constant  drip of soft waffle, evidence of a  newly discovered love affair with Hoody and his Beaker immortalisation club perhaps?. WTF happened? Top up of the retirement funds is favourite; but, “K” has another runner he fancies – Pea Green. Reckons Sandilands believes he ‘owns’ the 370 story and, differing opinions to his own; or stories he was not game to write being published by other outlets; or, any research conducted outside the ‘circle’, irritate him.

Who knows eh? But then, who reads him anymore? Certainly not anyone who knows a little more about aircraft and their operations than a travel writer, with aspirations.
Reply
#15

Jet Airways 9W2374 Pilot: 'If he's alive nail him, if he's dead blame him.' 

The above statement absolutely nails the very real dilemma that lies in ambush in equal parts for the normalised deficient pilot as much as the diligently, SOP proficient, professional pilot.

History will show that in aviation accident/incident MSM reporting and within government aviation safety agencies (think PelAir), that there is always a tendency to blame the pilot long before any real factual evidence and/or causal chains are presented or even considered.

Very much on the same theme, over on the Accidents OS thread in comment to this AP article - Colombia probe finds human error, lack of fuel in air crash - "K" said:
(12-28-2016, 04:36 AM)kharon Wrote:  It is absolutely disgraceful

That the law swings into action - after the fact. Prevention is always better than cure.

Where was the media and governmental hysteria before the accident occurred?

This was not a one off aberration – but a total; failure of ‘system’, before the fact.

This is what happens when the ‘regulator’ is reactive rather than pro-active; relying on the ‘law’ to escape the very real responsibilities to prevent, not prosecute.

Toot – toot.

Perhaps this heightened 'blame the pilot syndrome' in recent times is reflective of a 24/7 news cycle struggling to survive in a social media 'clickbait' world. However this does not excuse media outlets for dumping responsible, proper investigative journalism in favour of getting the 'scoop' at all costs... Dodgy
 
Via Daily O:
Quote:

Stop judging: Pilot of Jet Airways Goa runway crash writes a strong letter

'If he's alive nail him, if he's dead blame him.'  28-12-2016

Aviation is a strange profession. I love it to death, but the strange part is that if I meet my end in my line of work, it's most likely that I'll be blamed.

I'll be blamed long before any proof is brought forward. I'll be blamed by the media, by the people. I'll be blamed by the passengers if they survive. In a week the data recorders will be analysed and then maybe they'll find that it's not my fault. That I fought for hope amidst hopelessness till my dying breath.

Sadly that won't make as good a headline as much as "pilot error", or "pilot veers off runway when aligning for takeoff".

In fact, it was nothing to do with aligning that brought this ill-fated crew to a halt just short the peripheral wall at Dabolim yesterday (December 27).

How I wish I could explain concepts of asymmetric thrust to the number of people passing silent judgment and being armchair jurors. How do I tell someone about how much thrust 27,000 odd pounds is? How do I reiterate what a reverser unlock is? How do I tell the person that the same 27,000 pounds is now in an opposite direction?

Most of the crowd probably doesn't even know what a moment arm or a couple is. They dropped physics in 8th grade as it was too complex. That said, they blame the human machine who earns his bread and butter, putting into practice what they felt was too complicated.

[Image: planebd_122816104921.jpg]
Jet Airways Goa-Mumbai flight, which skid off the runway on December 27.

To be honest it's disgusting - flying this kind of passenger and taking responsibility for his life for however long it may be.

How do I explain not being able to see three taxiway lights in front of me to a crowd that says, "anyway you autoland in fog"? How?

It's at the brink of frustration that I'm writing this. Back in the day, an old grey instructor told me, "Son, in this world of civil aviation, its best to be a nameless faceless pilot who does his job and goes home!"

I probably didn't understand it then but now, more than ever, I totally understand. The sad part is it doesn't matter if it is a Cactus 1511 with Sully or the 9W aircraft.
Sadly, with technology improving in the home and workplace, the human has become the weak link. Sometimes one must note that the human is the strongest link. Without them shutting down the malfunctioning engine, the plane might have gone into the terminal, increasing the statistics of loss of life

As an appeal to the non-aviation public, believe that we as pilots love what we do and would never put anyone's life in jeopardy. We are sons, daughters, wives, husbands, parents, just like you. We haven't fallen from the realm of Asgard into the helm of these metal ships. It takes years of hard work to achieve it.

Media folk, this is an appeal to you: It's you who have sensationalised our profession with scandals, malpractices, and so on. Paint the right picture of pilots worldwide. Tell people that we are there to save lives, not take them. Make an honest effort to redeem your name when you're standing at heaven's gates, or you'll probably have the boatman remove you from the boat.

Educate the masses - who you manipulate to get more views - to the actual facts of thrust, lift, weight and drag. Tell them, from start to finish, what happens from takeoff to touchdown.

Do tell them that when they see the wind looping out of the window and the tip moving, there is a hand guiding this giant metal bird through the skies.


The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DailyO in or the India Today Group. The writers are solely responsible for any claims arising out of the contents of this article.

Writer
[Image: dailybite_121015084907.jpg] DailyBite
It will be a sad day indeed if, like the PelAir cover-up, government and/or it's agencies are implicated as compromising effective Annex 13 AAI through manipulating media with a confirmation bias line, i.e. that the pilot is to blame... Dodgy   
Here is a reminder of how John McCormick, with Beaker as his accomplice, tried to stitch up the pilot:
Quote:Video: Interview with John McCormick, Director Aviation Safety, CASA (Four Corners)

Video: Interview with Martin Dolan, Chief Commissioner, ATSB (Four Corners)

Quote:MICK QUINN: There were a lot of things that lined up here in various organisations on the day and unfortunately he just happened to be the person who was sitting there. This could happen again to someone else.

GEOFF THOMPSON: Almost three years after the ditching the Australian Transport Safety Bureau finally released its report last week.

The ATSB prides itself on being a 'no blame' investigator.

But its findings make it very clear that responsibility for the ditching rests primarily with the flight crew.

But there's a document which the Australian public was never meant to see.

It's CASA's special audit of Pel-Air, completed just after the ditching in 2009.

It identifies significant deficiencies within the company's Westwind operations in Pel-Air.

What it describes sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

It lists numerous breaches of aviation regulations and legislation covering fuel policy, flight planning and pilot training.

JOHN MCCORMICK: None of those, 31 I think it is, requests for corrective action that we found when we did the in-depth audit of Pel-Air would've affected that accident or prevented that accident.

GEOFF THOMPSON: But given that the operator was failing in areas of fuel planning, fatigue, check and training, lack of support for pilots, and these were regulatory breaches, isn't that something the Australian public has the right to know about, given that that's what the operator was doing when this ditching occurred?

JOHN MCCORMICK: Well as I say, none of those particular incidents or events that we looked at within that audit would've prevented that accident. The accident was caused by poor fuel planning, poor decision making.


GEOFF THOMSON: CASA's special audit found that Pel-Air failed to comply with approved fatigue management systems. It concludes that:


(Reads audit report): "Pel-Air have not managed fatigue risk to a standard considered appropriate, particularly for an operator conducting ad hoc 24 hour medivac operations"

MARTIN DOLAN: There was an indication there fatigue may have had a role to play. But the evidence available to us wasn't such that we'd come to the definitive view that there was a major fatigue related element.

JOHN MCCORMICK: In the end it's only the pilot who can decide whether he is fatigued or he or she is fatigued and unable to conduct a flight.
  
MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
#16

Mainstream media armchair critics - f#cktards in disguise

A well written letter by the GOA pilot.
It is a pilots lament to be blamed first and then hopefully cleared later (although mud does stick). The principles of standing down a crew after an incident or accident that they survive is solid. It dovetails in with 'just culture', if the proper rules of engagement are followed. Pilots understand and accept this methodology when it is applied fairly, correctly and by the book.

However, sadly nobody else is bound by the 'just culture' ethos. Arseclowns like Big 'R' McCormick, the airline executives and assorted Government spin doctors aren't capable of 'fairness'. Whether that is because of their lack of moral compass or simply having a shortage of chromosomes we will probably never know.
Armchair critics such as the conceited Sandilands and so-called aviation expert Geoffrey Thomas who have no experience flying a wide body aircraft suffering mechanical failure or landing in a typhoon when the airport is about to be closed are also equally culpable and complicit for creating the "blame the pilots and let's sensationalise the news article" environment we now live and work in.

Mainstream media is a parasite from which many writers grow rich and fat from after sucking on its teat for decades. Shame on all of you, you unconscionable pricks.
Reply
#17

(12-29-2016, 10:10 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  Jet Airways 9W2374 Pilot: 'If he's alive nail him, if he's dead blame him.' 

The above statement absolutely nails the very real dilemma that lies in ambush in equal parts for the normalised deficient pilot as much as the diligently, SOP proficient, professional pilot.

History will show that in aviation accident/incident MSM reporting and within government aviation safety agencies (think PelAir), that there is always a tendency to blame the pilot long before any real factual evidence and/or causal chains are presented or even considered.

Very much on the same theme, over on the Accidents OS thread in comment to this AP article - Colombia probe finds human error, lack of fuel in air crash - "K" said:
(12-28-2016, 04:36 AM)kharon Wrote:  It is absolutely disgraceful

That the law swings into action - after the fact. Prevention is always better than cure.

Where was the media and governmental hysteria before the accident occurred?

This was not a one off aberration – but a total; failure of ‘system’, before the fact.

This is what happens when the ‘regulator’ is reactive rather than pro-active; relying on the ‘law’ to escape the very real responsibilities to prevent, not prosecute.

Toot – toot.

Perhaps this heightened 'blame the pilot syndrome' in recent times is reflective of a 24/7 news cycle struggling to survive in a social media 'clickbait' world. However this does not excuse media outlets for dumping responsible, proper investigative journalism in favour of getting the 'scoop' at all costs... Dodgy
 
Via Daily O:
Quote:

Stop judging: Pilot of Jet Airways Goa runway crash writes a strong letter

'If he's alive nail him, if he's dead blame him.'  28-12-2016

Aviation is a strange profession. I love it to death, but the strange part is that if I meet my end in my line of work, it's most likely that I'll be blamed.

I'll be blamed long before any proof is brought forward. I'll be blamed by the media, by the people. I'll be blamed by the passengers if they survive. In a week the data recorders will be analysed and then maybe they'll find that it's not my fault. That I fought for hope amidst hopelessness till my dying breath.

Sadly that won't make as good a headline as much as "pilot error", or "pilot veers off runway when aligning for takeoff".

In fact, it was nothing to do with aligning that brought this ill-fated crew to a halt just short the peripheral wall at Dabolim yesterday (December 27).

How I wish I could explain concepts of asymmetric thrust to the number of people passing silent judgment and being armchair jurors. How do I tell someone about how much thrust 27,000 odd pounds is? How do I reiterate what a reverser unlock is? How do I tell the person that the same 27,000 pounds is now in an opposite direction?

Most of the crowd probably doesn't even know what a moment arm or a couple is. They dropped physics in 8th grade as it was too complex. That said, they blame the human machine who earns his bread and butter, putting into practice what they felt was too complicated.

[Image: planebd_122816104921.jpg]
Jet Airways Goa-Mumbai flight, which skid off the runway on December 27.

To be honest it's disgusting - flying this kind of passenger and taking responsibility for his life for however long it may be.

How do I explain not being able to see three taxiway lights in front of me to a crowd that says, "anyway you autoland in fog"? How?

It's at the brink of frustration that I'm writing this. Back in the day, an old grey instructor told me, "Son, in this world of civil aviation, its best to be a nameless faceless pilot who does his job and goes home!"

I probably didn't understand it then but now, more than ever, I totally understand. The sad part is it doesn't matter if it is a Cactus 1511 with Sully or the 9W aircraft.
Sadly, with technology improving in the home and workplace, the human has become the weak link. Sometimes one must note that the human is the strongest link. Without them shutting down the malfunctioning engine, the plane might have gone into the terminal, increasing the statistics of loss of life

As an appeal to the non-aviation public, believe that we as pilots love what we do and would never put anyone's life in jeopardy. We are sons, daughters, wives, husbands, parents, just like you. We haven't fallen from the realm of Asgard into the helm of these metal ships. It takes years of hard work to achieve it.

Media folk, this is an appeal to you: It's you who have sensationalised our profession with scandals, malpractices, and so on. Paint the right picture of pilots worldwide. Tell people that we are there to save lives, not take them. Make an honest effort to redeem your name when you're standing at heaven's gates, or you'll probably have the boatman remove you from the boat.

Educate the masses - who you manipulate to get more views - to the actual facts of thrust, lift, weight and drag. Tell them, from start to finish, what happens from takeoff to touchdown.

Do tell them that when they see the wind looping out of the window and the tip moving, there is a hand guiding this giant metal bird through the skies.


The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DailyO in or the India Today Group. The writers are solely responsible for any claims arising out of the contents of this article.

Writer
[Image: dailybite_121015084907.jpg] DailyBite
It will be a sad day indeed if, like the PelAir cover-up, government and/or it's agencies are implicated as compromising effective Annex 13 AAI through manipulating media with a confirmation bias line, i.e. that the pilot is to blame... Dodgy   
Here is a reminder of how John McCormick, with Beaker as his accomplice, tried to stitch up the pilot:
Quote:Video: Interview with John McCormick, Director Aviation Safety, CASA (Four Corners)

Video: Interview with Martin Dolan, Chief Commissioner, ATSB (Four Corners)

Quote:MICK QUINN: There were a lot of things that lined up here in various organisations on the day and unfortunately he just happened to be the person who was sitting there. This could happen again to someone else.

GEOFF THOMPSON: Almost three years after the ditching the Australian Transport Safety Bureau finally released its report last week.

The ATSB prides itself on being a 'no blame' investigator.

But its findings make it very clear that responsibility for the ditching rests primarily with the flight crew.

But there's a document which the Australian public was never meant to see.

It's CASA's special audit of Pel-Air, completed just after the ditching in 2009.

It identifies significant deficiencies within the company's Westwind operations in Pel-Air.

What it describes sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

It lists numerous breaches of aviation regulations and legislation covering fuel policy, flight planning and pilot training.

JOHN MCCORMICK: None of those, 31 I think it is, requests for corrective action that we found when we did the in-depth audit of Pel-Air would've affected that accident or prevented that accident.

GEOFF THOMPSON: But given that the operator was failing in areas of fuel planning, fatigue, check and training, lack of support for pilots, and these were regulatory breaches, isn't that something the Australian public has the right to know about, given that that's what the operator was doing when this ditching occurred?

JOHN MCCORMICK: Well as I say, none of those particular incidents or events that we looked at within that audit would've prevented that accident. The accident was caused by poor fuel planning, poor decision making.


GEOFF THOMSON: CASA's special audit found that Pel-Air failed to comply with approved fatigue management systems. It concludes that:


(Reads audit report): "Pel-Air have not managed fatigue risk to a standard considered appropriate, particularly for an operator conducting ad hoc 24 hour medivac operations"

MARTIN DOLAN: There was an indication there fatigue may have had a role to play. But the evidence available to us wasn't such that we'd come to the definitive view that there was a major fatigue related element.

JOHN MCCORMICK: In the end it's only the pilot who can decide whether he is fatigued or he or she is fatigued and unable to conduct a flight.
  

(12-29-2016, 10:50 AM)Gobbledock Wrote:  Mainstream media armchair critics - f#cktards in disguise

A well written letter by the GOA pilot.
It is a pilots lament to be blamed first and then hopefully cleared later (although mud does stick). The principles of standing down a crew after an incident or accident that they survive is solid. It dovetails in with 'just culture', if the proper rules of engagement are followed. Pilots understand and accept this methodology when it is applied fairly, correctly and by the book.

However, sadly nobody else is bound by the 'just culture' ethos. Arseclowns like Big 'R' McCormick, the airline executives and assorted Government spin doctors aren't capable of 'fairness'. Whether that is because of their lack of moral compass or simply having a shortage of chromosomes we will probably never know.
Armchair critics such as the conceited Sandilands and so-called aviation expert Geoffrey Thomas who have no experience flying a wide body aircraft suffering mechanical failure or landing in a typhoon when the airport is about to be closed are also equally culpable and complicit for creating the "blame the pilots and let's sensationalise the news article" environment we now live and work in.

Mainstream media is a parasite from which many writers grow rich and fat from after sucking on its teat for decades. Shame on all of you, you unconscionable pricks.
Reply
#18

A new champion arises.

The ATSB report shows that problems occurring with air traffic control are not necessarily the result of workload, despite recent reports on ABC TV that cuts to 700 back-office jobs at Airservices Australia were endangering air safety. Airservices staff have expanded by about 50 per cent to 4500 over the past decade.

Airservices Australia chief Jason Harfield described the ¬reports as “reprehensible and ¬irresponsible”

No wonder the public are confused; for a supposed ‘crack writer’ Cleary clearly has NFI.  He cites ‘reports’ – plural as being reprehensible and irresponsible. Both of ‘em, really? I can’t imagine Halfwit calling the soft, airbrushed report from the ATSB as such, not in a million. You’d reckon a ‘journo’ could parse (resolve) his statements better than that.

Halfwit and Hi-Viz would be kicking Badgers over the ABC’s well researched, accurate reporting of the dreadful state our ‘safety-net’ agencies are in. Yet Cleary seems to be assuming the role of that well known ‘official’ mouthpiece for ‘official rubbish’ of the unlamented Steve Creedy, long may he rot. 

I do not like thee, Doctor Fell,
The reason why I cannot tell;
But this I know, and know full well,
I do not like thee, Doctor Fell.

Published and flicked. Endit.
Reply
#19

{Quiet chuckle): I read the “K” twiddle above this morning, then the article, then I wondered how long it would take P2 to spot the slow ball, a little wide of leg stump and take a mighty swing at it. Not too long was the resounding answer - HERE.

I reckon Tick & Flick is too good a place for Cleary; Hall of Shame has my vote for a despicable, clumsy, low punch so typical of the ‘official’ line at the ASA.  Only natural I suppose that a Halfwit would team up with Half-truth.

The piece written by Cleary is, disgusting and that’s not only IMO. Good job P2., nicely delivered slow ball "K".
Reply
#20

"..Barkeep a GT with a twist of lemon.." Rolleyes

Via the UP... Confused :

Quote:Geoff Thomas strikes again!

From News Limited:

What caused the Swan River seaplane crash on Australia Day | Perth Now

"When the plane crashed it was travelling north-east so the 20km/hr south-west wind would have worsened the situation by affectively reducing his over-the-wing-speed by 20km/hr."

Hmmm...

Noticed GT's thread on the UP got closed down, curious I trolled the last post and I struck GOLD... Big Grin

Quote:Another Number:

Media Boss to GT: Geoff, maaate, everyone keeps telling me you're a bloody drongo! I'm beginning to think that you're a little under-qualified - a little bag-chucking doesn't actually make you "the world's greatest aviation expert" - even if you've been (self-)awarded more than anyone else on the planet!

GT: Maaaate! If you're going to accuse me of just stealing it all off PPRuNe again...

Media boss: Well, we know how you love to cut-n-paste...

GT:Yeah, but,

Media Boss: ...and I could probably get a real pilot for a tenth of what we pay you!

GT: Yeah, but ... just look at PPRuNe - they'll hijack threads over petty semantics, get caught up in endless "mine's-bigger-than-yours" arguments...

Media Boss: Sure, it seems like that, but...

GT: And no-one, but no-one can compete with my formula:
20% reality
20% off-the-planet "how much is GT putting up his nose these days" unfathomable BS
20% cut-n-paste from PPRuNe
40% churnalism, press-release-spewing, freebies, junkets...

Boss: Okay, okay ... have another glass of champers. I was going to give you the fright of your life...

GT: Allowing me back on the controls of my unique, mighty 777 sim?

Boss: Sending you economy class...
Choc frog for Another Number Wink

MTF...P2 Cool

Ps Old GT is getting a bit precious isn't he... Dodgy
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